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A "feminist perspective" in fisheries builds on the fact that women of fishing communities take on multidimensional roles that straddle both production and reproduction...

Yemaya

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Issue No:47
  • :0973-1156
  • :December
  • :2014
  • :English

 

The current year marked an important milestone for women in fisheries through the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication—the SSF Guidelines. These provide an important opportunity for women to be able to come together, fight for their human rights and strengthen their access to decent livelihood and equal benefits in the sector. However, the formation and strengthening of effective organisations of women is critical for this process.

This issue of Yemaya brings out the complexities of the economic and social environment in which women continue to struggle in the fishing sector. We see from the examples of Kerala and Gujarat in India, and of Portugal, how globalisation and the economic crisis, as well as governmental interventions in the name of modernisation, are all impacting fishing in local areas. Women are left grappling with the ill-effects of these changes as their customary rights to fresh fish sources and to a safe and secure market place for their activities are increasingly eroded. Women in the sector are also faced with new internal challenges, whether in terms of being forced to leave traditional livelihoods in search of waged work, or of increasing numbers joining fish trade for lack of other livelihood opportunities. This forms the context in which women in the small-scale fisheries have to take up the struggle for both maintaining their existing rights, and for gaining new rights in the fresh occupations they seek.

 

From the Editor

The current year marked an important milestone for women in fisheries through the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication—the SSF Guidelines. These provide an important opportunity for women to be able to come together, fight for their human rights and strengthen their access to decent livelihood and equal benefits in the sector. However, the formation and strengthening of effective organisations of women is critical for this process.

This issue of Yemaya brings out the complexities of the economic and social environment in which women continue to struggle in the fishing sector. We see from the examples of Kerala and Gujarat in India, and of Portugal, how globalisation and the economic crisis, as well as governmental interventions in the name of modernisation, are all impacting fishing in local areas. Women are left grappling with the ill-effects of these changes as their customary rights to fresh fish sources and to a safe and secure market place for their activities are increasingly eroded. Women in the sector are also faced with new internal challenges, whether in terms of being forced to leave traditional livelihoods in search of waged