Sno Title Type URL Theme Country Abstract Regions Keywords Rank Comments Available in DC
1
Heads Up!
newsletters
http://www.heads-up.net/
N/a
A collaborative on-line newsletter on Oregon coastal issues by Oregon Sea Grant and the Women's Coalition for Pacific Fisheries. The mission of Heads Up! is to strengthen the connection between fishermen, fishing families, industry, communities, agencies, and other groups through the exchange of timely, important information that will support the industry's transition to the future.
1
No
2
Fishers of Dar: A film of fisheries in Tanzania
multimedia
N/a
1
No
3
AKTEA Newsletter of fishwomen.org in English
newsletters
http://www.fishwomen.org/article.php3?id_article=17
N/a
1
No
4
Nandlal S. 2005. Driti Women’s Tilapia Project. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 15, April 2005, New Caledonia. 23p
newsletters
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/news/WIF/WIF15/WIF15.pdf
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
This article documents the success story of a women’s group in Driti, a small village in Bua Province, Vanua Levu, Fiji in the development of aquaculture in the region through Tilapia culture. The group showed great initiative carrying out the project even when it was discontinued by the men's group in the village.
Oceania
Women,Tilapia,Projects,Fisheries Development,Fiji,Aquaculture
4
No
5
Guste Ma. J and Rosario-Malonzo, J del. 2004. Women in Philippine Aquaculture. Asia Pacific Research Network. Journals: Volume 11, December 2004.
newsletters
http://www.aprnet.org/index.php?a=show&t=journals&c=Volume%2011%20December%202004&i=21
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
According to the Department of Agriculture, aquaculture would account for half of the country’s fish requirements by 2008. As of 2002, 40 per cent of total fisheries production already comes from aquaculture. Although there is no available sex disaggregated data on employment in the aquaculture sector, women are very much part of this production, from pre-harvest, harvest, to post-harvest stages. IBON’s field research in areas where aquaculture is practiced confirms this assertion. What is the extent of women’s participation in aquaculture? More importantly, has aquaculture helped empower women economically and socially? Or has it only worsened the Filipina fish farmer’s plight?
Asia
Women,Role,PHF,Informal Sector,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,Fish Harvesting,Employment,Economy,Database,Consumers,Aquaculture
4
No
6
Felsing M, Brugere C, Kusakabe K and Kelkar G. 2000. Women for Aquaculture or Aquaculture for Women? INFOFISH International, Vol. 3. 34-40pp.
newsletters
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
The article analyzes the role of women in the aquaculture sector in Southeast Asia. Aquaculture is becoming very important in the region but the role of women has often been adversely affected. The article tries to identify some ways to alleviate the problem.
Asia
Women,South East Asia,Labour,Aquaculture
5
No
7
Flores P E. 1996. Women in Ecuador’s Fishing Families. Intercoast Network, Issue 28. 7-8pp.
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
A recent study by members of Ecuador’s coastal management project, Programa de Manejo Recursos de Costeros (PMRC), has examined the role women play in the post-larval fishery, not just in the capture and cleaning of post-larvae, but in the context of everyday community life. The post-larvae fishery not only serves to provide the basic resource for development of the shrimp industry, but also represents an alternative source of work and income.
Seafood Processing,Seafood Industry,Larvae,Income,Employment,Ecuador,Economy,Coastal Management,Coastal Fisheries,Aquaculture
3
No
8
Gopalakrishnan A. 1996. Role of Women in Indian Shrimp Farming. Naga, Vol. 19, Issue 4, Manila. 16-18pp.
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
Women in India are involved in various facets of shrimp farming, including pond construction, seed collection, collection of feed materials and preparation of feeds, pond maintenance and post-harvest handling.
Asia
Women,Shrimp,Seeds,Pond Fish Culture,PHF,India,Gender,Fish Feed,Culture,Construction
2
No
9
Minh L T, Huong D T and Tuan N A. 1996. Women in Cantho City are Profitably Involved in Fish Nursing Activities. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 1, Issue 2. 40-41pp.
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
The findings are presented of a study conducted regarding the participation of women in fish nursing in the main fish fingerling production area, Cantho City, of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. It was observed that all 33 families who were nursing fish in 1995 hired women and that women contributed about 38 per cent to total labour use. None of the women had vocational training in aquaculture but more than half had finished high school.
Asia
Women,Vietnam,Training Education,Labour,Income,Fishing Industry,Fingerlings,Employment,Economy
2
No
10
Nam S, Vibol O, Viseth H. and Nandeesha M C. 1998. Women in Small-scale Aquaculture Development in Cambodia. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 3, Issue 1. 20-22pp.
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
The findings are presented of a survey conducted among 215 families involved in fish culture in Prey Veng and Svey Rieng Provinces in Cambodia, in order to determine the involvement of women in the small-scale aquaculture sector. The survey identified constraints to, and opportunities for, the participation of women in the sector, and also examined the access to, and control of, resources in regard to fish culture at the family level, verifying the position of women in regard to these issues owing to the introduction of a new activity.
Asia
Women,Surveys,Small Scale Fisheries,Participatory Management,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Resources,Cambodia,Aquaculture,Access Rights
3
No
11
Siar S V, Samonte G P B and Espada A T. 1995. Participation of Women in Oyster and Mussel Farming in Western Visayas, Philippines. Aquaculture Research, Vol. 26, Issue 7. 459-467pp.
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
This paper provides baseline information on the involvement of women in small-scale coastal aquaculture such as the farming of slipper oyster.
Asia
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Oyster,Labour,Income,Farms,Coastal Aquaculture
2
No
12
Parlikar K. 1993. National Workshop on Women in Fisheries (Some Methodological issues) held from 28-30 August 1993 at Baroda. Women, Household Development Studies Information Centre, M.S.University of Baroda. 66p
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
This document is a compilation of papers presented at the National Workshop on Women in Fisheries. It provides an overview on the role of women in fisheries in the coastal states of India: Maharashtra and Kerala. It also discusses the role of women in aquaculture and shrimp culture and the need for training fisherwomen.
Asia
Women,Training,Shrimp,Role,Maharashtra,Labour,Kerala,India,Gender,Coastal Areas,Aquaculture
2
No
13
Gerrard S C. 1991. Clans, Gender and Kilns - Examples from a fisheries development project in Sota Village, Tanzania. In Kristiane Stølen and Mariken Vaa: Gender and Development, Oslo Universitetsforlaget. 33p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
From pre-colonial times the people of Sota, a village on the shores of Lake Victoria in Mara region of Tanzania, have subsisted on agriculture, animal husbandry and fishing. This article documents co-operative ventures between women fish traders, local government representatives, the external fisheries bureaucracy and the training institutions between 1987 and late 1989. Some examples of such ventures are improvements to the smoking technology by building kilns and training for enhancing women’s small-scale fish trade.
Africa
Women,Training,Trade,Technology,Tanzania,Subsistence Fisheries,Lake Victoria,Fishworker Cooperatives,Fish Processing,Africa
3
No
14
Madhu S R. 1998. Post-harvest Fisheries: A Manual of Information and Guidelines for NGOs and Development Agencies Working with Artisanal Fishing Communities. Department of International Development Post-harvest Fisheries Project. 149p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
This is a book of guidelines for NGOs and development agencies that work with artisanal fishing communities, particularly in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. It provides descriptive overviews of post-harvest fisheries and about community institution-building, human resource development, and gender development in small-scale fisheries. It explains issues with illustrations related to technical and marketing issues, credit and finance, monitoring and evaluation. It draws attention to the interlinked and inter-related nature of problems facing fishing communities.
Asia
Technology,Sri Lanka,PHF,Monitoring,Markets,India,Human Resources Development,Gender,Fishing Communities,Credit,Bangladesh,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
15
Veitayaki J, Tawake A, Fong S and Meo S. 2007. Assisting Coastal Communities in the Pacific Islands with Alternative Sources of Livelihood and Income. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 16, March 2007, New Caledonia. 10-11pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF16/WIF16.pdf
Development Initiatives N/a
This article outlines the initiatives of the International Ocean Institute‘s Pacific Islands Operational Centre (IOIPI) and the Marine Studies Programme (MSP) to assist women and youth in coastal communities to generate alternative sources of livelihood in the Pacific Islands. The potential of women and youth to contribute to the upgradation of community conditions have been specifically recognized in these efforts. The activities supported include organization of gender workshops in the Coral Coast area of Fiji and in Upolu, Samoa; supporting a women’s souvenir shop in Rennell and Bellona, Solomon Islands and a mat-buying venture in Vanuaso, Gau, Fiji.
Women,Solomon Is,Samoa,Pacific Islands,Organisations,Livelihood,Labour,Income,Gender,Fiji,Exclusion,Employment,Coastal Communities
3
No
16
Lowrey P. 2003. Women Diversify Their Livelihoods. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 13, December 2003, New Caledonia. 15-16pp
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF13/WIF13.pdf
Development Initiatives N/a
This article is about a success story of a fishing community in Moree, Ghana. The community, particularly the women, not only solved the problem they faced—processing fish—using lateral thinking, but also in the process acquired, and worked with local and national allies, setting in motion the momentum for success.
Africa
Women,Reproductive Labour,Ghana,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fish Processing,Exclusion
3
No
17
Aswani S and Weiant P. 2003. Shellfish Monitoring and Women’s Participatory Management in Roviana, Solomon Islands. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 12, May 2003, New Caledonia. 3-11pp
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF12/WIF12.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Development Initiatives N/a
In 1999, the women of Baraulu and Bulelavata villages in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands, created a community-based marine protected area to sustain marine resources valuable for nutrition and income-generation. This has resulted in sustaining invertebrate biological resources and in promoting strong community support. The paper outlines the details of the project, its biological results, the processes involved ensuring community participation and lessons learnt. A high level of community involvement is achieved when positive scientific results generated by the monitoring protocol, are returned to the community. This educational process cross-fertilized indigenous and Western knowledge and increased women’s interest in the project and their direct participation in monitoring and enforcement. The project’s success has encouraged several nearby villages to launch conservation initiatives.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Knowledge,Sustainable Fisheries,Solomon Is,Resources Management,Nutrition,MPA,Monitoring,Marine Resources,Income,Food Security,Empowerment,Ecology,Conservation,Community Based Management
4
No
18
Villareal L V and Upare M A. 2003. Report of the National Workshop on Best Practices in Microfinance Programmes for Women in Coastal Fishing Communities in India, Goa, India, 1-4 July 2003. FAO Fisheries Report No. 724. FAO, Rome. 50p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
In most societies, as in India, small-scale fishing and fish farming households are considered to be one of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups. Microfinance programmes are seen as a means for these households to gain access to much-needed credit services that are appropriate for their needs. Moreover, because women comprise a significant proportion of such households, microfinance should also serve as an effective tool to assist and empower women in fishing communities. It is in this context that the national workshop was organized. The main workshop objective was to analyze and document recent experiences with microfinance programmes in support of women and poverty alleviation in coastal fishing communities in India and to draw conclusions with regard to best practices in this field. The workshop also aimed to provide guidance to financial institutions, governmental and non-governmental institutions involved in fisheries development, fishermen's and women's associations, donors and other stakeholders for the future development of microfinance programmes and other necessary support services. The workshop was organized by FAO, in cooperation with the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) as the host organization. It was a follow-up to the recommendations of the recently concluded Regional Workshop on Microfinance Programmes in Support of Responsible Aquaculture and Marine Capture Fisheries in Asia, held in Chiang Mai, Thailand, in December 2002. The workshop, while highlighting best practices in financial support for women in fishing communities, had a broader and multidimensional perspective. As such, the presentations, discussions and recommendations were not only limited to financial support but also covered the following important thematic areas: government policies and initiatives, research, technology development, appropriate support services and other financial support and interventions for the sector.
Asia
Women,Technology,Small Scale Fisheries,Reproductive Labour,Poverty,Organisations,NGO,NABARD,Microfinance,India,Food Security,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Development,FAO,Credit,Coastal Areas
3
No
19
Tietze U and Villareal L V. 2003. Microfinance in Fisheries and Aquaculture: Guidelines and Case Studies. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 440. FAO, Rome. 103p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
These guidelines provide general principles and basic considerations for those involved in providing microfinance services to fisheries and aquaculture and for those who intend to include fishing and fish farming communities as part of the client base of their operation. The guidelines further elaborate on lending models, methodologies and policies that have applicability to fisheries and address concerns that are particular to the sector, while adhering to best practices in the microfinance field. The publication also contains a summary of the proceedings and recommendations of the Report of the Regional Workshop on Microfinance Programmes in Support of Responsible Aquaculture and Marine Capture Fisheries in Asia. The workshop was held in Chiang Mai, Thailand from 16 to 20 December 2002. An overview of recent experiences with microfinance programmes in fisheries and aquaculture in Asia is given and conclusions are drawn regarding future directions and initiatives in this field. The workshop was attended by 31 participants from eight South and Southeast Asian countries: Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam. It brought together experts representing fisheries government institutions, financial institutions, academic and research institutions, NGOs, co-operatives, women‘s unions, fishermen’s associations and technical staff of foreign-assisted projects in aquaculture in the region. The publication concludes with two examples of successful FAO-executed projects that incorporated microfinance programmes in fishing community development in the Philippines and in small-scale aquaculture development in Viet Nam, with a special focus on gender and poverty alleviation. The case studies provide practical examples of how microcredit can contribute to the empowerment of women in fishing and fish farming communities, help alleviate poverty and contribute to the socio-economic wellbeing and food security of fishers and fish farmers.
Asia
Women,Vietnam,South East Asia,South Asia,Socio-economic Aspects,Poverty,Policy,Philippines,Microfinance,Methodology,Gender,Food Security,Fisheries,Finance,Farms,Empowerment,Credit,Aquaculture
4
No
20
Chaturvedi G. 2004. Women in Fisheries on the East Coast of India: A Review. BOBP/ REP No. 97. 84p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
The women in fisheries programme was designed to assess the needs and status of women in fishing communities with regard to their livelihood security, food and nutrition, and community development. This field study evaluates the impacts of the past interventions made by the Bay of Bengal Programme and other agencies and also determines the level of empowerment at the grassroots. Over 30 villages were visited across Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry, Andhra Pradesh, Orrisa, and West Bengal. Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) were conducted with women in the fisheries sector. Alternative livelihood strategies were explored and recorded to pave the way for meaningful future interventions by BOBP-IGO. Self-Help Groups (SHGs) were found to be catalysts in transforming the lives of fisheries through viable micro-enterprise development.
Asia
Women,Tamil Nadu,SHG,Reproductive Labour,PRA,Pondicherry,Nutrition,Livelihood,Labour,Informal Sector,India,Impact,Gender,Food Security,Fishing Communities,Empowerment,Credit,Community Development,BOBP,Andhra Pradesh
4
No
21
Fairbairn-Dunlop P. 1995. Teach a Woman to Process Fish and…Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 63-70pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
Expands on a project, entitled The Women in Fisheries Support Project (WIFSP) in Papua New Guinea, a project targeting women and representing the incorporation of food security and income generating activities within a national project.
Oceania
Women,Projects,PNG,Income,Food Security
2
No
22
Women and Fisheries Network. 1995. Not Just Talk: The Discussions that Spawned the Women and Fisheries Network. Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network. Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 171-177pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
This article explains the reasons that led to the creation of the Women and Fisheries Network, namely the need to pay more attention to women’s fisheries activities in Pacific islands, the need to support the subsistence sector, to recognize women’s economic contributions in semi-subsistence communities, for more research into the nature and significance of women’s fisheries, and to assist women’s involvement in commercial activities. This article also highlights the Women and Fisheries Network project.
Oceania
Women,Subsistence Fisheries,Reproductive Labour,Politics,Participatory Management,Pacific Islands,Fishworkers Organisation,Fishing Communities,Commercial Fishing
3
No
23
Alvares M L M and Maneschy M C. 1997. From Invisible Work to Collective Action: Research and Participation with Women from the Fishing Communities of the Amazonian Coast. Pla Notes, International Institute for Environment and Development, Issue 30. 62-65pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
An account of a project aimed at enhancing recognition of the roles of women in the fishing productive system and fishing communities on the coast of the State of Para, Brazil. Activities were planned to build or strengthen channels for political participation by women in fisher communities, and women’s associations were formed.
Latin America
Women,Politics,Participatory Management,Gender,Fishworkers Organisation,Fishing Communities,Coastal Fisheries,Brazil
4
No
24
Bravo M. 1996. Market Economy Poses Problems for Concheras. Intercoast Network, Issue 28, Coastal Resources Center, Narragansett, Rhode Island. 4p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
The cockle-gathering done in the village of Bunche, Muisne Canton, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador is all done by women known as concheras. The Association of the Bunche Concheras has attempted to increase the income they received from selling their cockles. The pilot sales were facilitated by personnel of the Coastal Resources Management Program (PMRC) and the Artisanal Fisheries Assessment Programme (PRAPESCA).
Oceania
Women,Income,Gender,Fishworker Cooperatives,Employment,Ecuador,Economy,Cockles
3
No
25
Gomathi B. 1998. A Tale of Two Tricycles. Phf News, Issue 13. 5-7pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
A brief account is given of the experiences of two communities in Tamil Nadu, India, regarding the use of tricycles by women fish vendors to assist them in reaching fish markets quickly. Numerous management problems were encountered by women in Periakuppam, near Mahabalipuram—it was difficult to find a reliable driver, the village men were hostile, and the sangam women often quarreled with each other regarding costs and rights to use the vehicle. This resulted in the fact that much of the time the tricycle remains unused. However, when tricycles were made available to women fish vendors in Nagapattinam, the results were much more successful.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Transportation,Tamil Nadu,India,Fishing Communities,Fish Marketing,Development
4
No
26
Kamila A. 1995. Fish Marketing Containers for Women Vendors. Phf News, Issue 1. 6-7pp.
0
http://www.onefish.org/cds_upload/1050598346760_phf1995_01.pdf
Development Initiatives N/a
The findings are presented of a study commissioned by the ODA Post-Harvest Fisheries Project conducted in South India with the aim of producing a suitable container for the transportation of fish by women. Various designs were developed, based mainly on suggestions made by women themselves.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Transportation,PHF,India,Containers
3
No
27
Kibria MdG, Edwards P, Kelkar G and Demaine H. 1999. Women in Pond Aquaculture in the Oxbow Lakes of Bangladesh. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 4, Issue 4. 7-14pp.
0
Development Initiatives,Women and Resources Management N/a
Fish and fisheries play an integral part of the culture and tradition in the life of the people of Bangladesh. The country has some 600 oxbow lakes created from dead river-bends scattered over the southwestern region of the country. The introduction of community management in 23 of the common property oxbow lakes has involved active participation of women. Women are successfully included in the management of oxbow lake fisheries under the Oxbow Lake Small-Scale Fishermen Project II. An assessment is made of the technological and socio-economic effects of Fish Farming Group pond aquaculture, with emphasis on the involvement of women. Some recommendations are made based on social, technological and gender aspects for the future sustainability of Fish Farming Groups.
Asia
Women,Technology,Socio-economic Aspects,Reproductive Labour,Pond Fish Culture,Participatory Management,Lakes,Gender,Community Management,Bangladesh,Aquaculture
3
No
28
Madhu S R. 1991. After Victoria Falls: Women in Fisheries and Aquaculture. ALCOM News, Issue 4. 10-15pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
A brief account is given of topics discussed at a seminar held at Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe entitled “Gender issues in fisheries and aquaculture.” Various FAO projects were referred to: ASEAN Project for Women; Women’s fish processing, Sierra Leone; Fish market for fisherwomen, Besant Nagar, Madras, India; Fisheries development in Lake Kivu, Rwanda; and Smoking kilns in Malawi. FAO policies on women’s issues were examined and strategies for future projects summarized.
Women,Smoking,Sierra Leone,Rwanda,Reproductive Labour,Policy,Malawi,India,Gender,Fishworkers Organisation,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,FAO,ASEAN,Aquaculture
3
No
29
Mili S N. 1997. Marketing of Handloom Products Made by Rakhain Women, Cox’s Bazar. Phf News, Issue 12. 25-26pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
Details are given of a pilot venture conducted in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, in order to train the Rakhain fisherwomen in weaving and marketing handloom products as an alternative income source.
Asia
Women,Training,Socio-economic Aspects,Income,Fishing Communities,Employment,Bangladesh
2
No
30
Mohapatra, B. 1998. Empowering Women: A Success Story from Orissa. Phf News, Vol. 13. 12p.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
A brief account is given of the success story of women fish vendors in Orissa, India regarding the use of ice boxes to maintain the quality of the fish during transportation from the landing centre to the market. A women’s group was formed, following assistance by the Post-Harvest Fisheries Project in 1995, to manage four ice boxes. Women entered into an agreement with the traders who brought ice into the village, brought fish and carried catches back: the traders would give women ice free of cost and women would ensure supply of fish in good condition.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Transportation,Storage,PHF,Orissa,Organisations,Labour,India,Ice,Fish Quality,Fish Marketing,Containers
3
No
31
Neis B. et al. 2005. Changing Tides: Gender, Fisheries and Globalization. Fernwood Publishing, Halifax. 205p.
0
Globalization N/a
This book talks about the way women’s lives and gender relations within the world’s fisheries are being shaped by globalization. It is divided into six sections and brings together contributions from researchers and community workers from 13 countries of the world, juxtaposing case studies with accounts from activists and fisheries workers. This book points to the ways in which globalization and associated resource degradation, privatization and the concentration of ownership and control of fisheries are jeopardizing the lives and livelihoods of women fishworkers and their families. The short articles give voice to the concerns of fisheries workers while the regional and national case studies scrutinize the links between changes in fisheries associated with globalization and the experiences of women who depend upon the fisheries sector. The contributions also reflect a range of theoretical perspectives, including insights from feminist political economy—ideology, discourse, social construction and ecofeminism.
World
Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Privatization,Privatisation,Politics,Livelihood,Globalization,Globalisation,Gender,Fishing Industry,Feminism,Exclusion,Economy,Culture
5
Jackie Sunde, a researcher with the Masifundise Development Trust (MDT), Cape Town, South Africa reviewed the book in the article titled "Changing Tides: Gender, Fisheries and Globalization" that appeared in the December 2005 Issue of Yemaya, the Gender and Fisheries Newsletter of ICSF. The perspective of the book is clearly stated—it adopts “a feminist approach that seeks to be global, critical, holistic and integrative”. The editors must be highly commended for bringing together a very vast sea of literature on each of the aspects—gender, globalization and fisheries—and for challenging the boundaries of conventional methodologies by documenting and collating such diverse contributions in a most useful and creative way, says Jackie. For full text of the review see URL http://www.icsf.net/SU/Yem/EN/20/art05.pdf
No
32
Nayak N. 2002. Pitching Women Against Each Other: Women Network to Counter Globalization in Fisheries. Presented at the International Sociology Congress, Brisbane, Australia, 2002. 13p.
0
Globalization N/a
While a minority of people in the world today enjoys the fruits of advanced technology and the globalization phenomenon, the majority find themselves up against a wall. This is particularly evident among the coastal communities all over the world, who have for generations lived off the ocean resources. The author explains how globalization furthers the ongoing exploitation of resources and women. And she points out that networking among coastal community organizations reveals more blatantly the tentacles of the global market.
World
Women,Technology,Resources Management,Organisations,Markets,Globalization,Coastal Communities,Globalisation
3
No
33
MacDonald M. 2002. Gender, Globalization and Fisheries Workers and Communities. International Workshop on Globalization, Gender and the Fisheries, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, 5-12 May 2000. 16p.
0
Globalization N/a
This paper discusses the impact of globalization and the expansion of world wide markets on fisheries. Technological change and the international search for new markets has paved the way to cheap labour. In this context, it examines the gender dimensions of globalization and how it affects the communities dependent on fisheries. It also puts forth some of the general challenges faced by fisherpeople because of this and strategies for future action.
World
Technology,Patriarchy,Markets,Labour,Impact,Globalization,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries,Exclusion,Employment Discrimination,Globalisation
4
No
34
Medard M. 2003. Partners in mutual trust: Globalization. SAMUDRA Report Issue 34, March 2003, India. 20-28pp
http://www.icsf.net/images/samudra/pdf/english/issue_34/650_art04.pdf
Globalization N/a
This article explores the changing roles of women and the deterioration of their livelihoods caused by globalization, especially in the export-oriented Nile Perch fisheries of Lak Victoria, Tanzania. There might be significant reduction of women working in this sector caused by the entry of wholesale merchants with the technological and capital capability of delivering the processing standards required for international trade against whom women entrepreneurs have to compete. While women are employed in the processing sector, they tend to be absorbed in low status and poorly paid work, often related to reproductive labour, such as laundry, sweeping and cleaning. In contrast, men occupy highly paid jobs involving procurement, quality control, engineering, supervision and so on. Often women’s work is informal with long and irregular working hours that preclude family commitments.
Africa
Women,Wages,Technology,Tanzania,Nile Perch,Markets,Livelihood,Lake Victoria,Lake Fisheries,Labour Standards,Globalization,Globalisation,Fish Processing,Exports,Employment Discrimination,Employment,Conditions of Work,Capital,Africa
3
No
35
Sharma C. 2003. The Impact of Fisheries Development and Globalization Processes on Women of Fishing Communities in the Asian Region. Paper Presented in Research Conference on the Impact of Globalization on Women Labour, 18th June 2003.
0
http://www.aprnet.org/index.php?a=show&t=researches&c=Research%20Conference%20on%20the%20Impact%20of%20Globalization%20on%20Women%20Labor&i=6
Globalization N/a
Millions of people depend on fisheries for a living in the Asian region, a sector that undoubtedly is a major source of employment, income and food security. This paper looks at the impact of fisheries development and globalization processes on women of fishing communities in the Asian region and their responses to these changes. It also includes initiatives taken by them to deal with the situation in positive ways. The paper notes an absence of information or statistics and proposes areas for future research. It includes the following sections: (1) Fisheries in Asia (2) The role of women in fisheries in Asia, (3) Impact of fisheries development and globalization processes on women of fishing communities, (4) Women’s participation in organizations, (5) A feminist perspective on fisheries: a need for clarity, and (6) Important research issues.
Asia
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Research and Development,Reproductive Labour,Organisations,Livelihood,Impact,Globalization,Globalisation,Food Security,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Development,Fisheries,Feminism,Employment,Asia
4
No
36
Cahill M and Martland S. 1993. Women in the Newfoundland Fishery. Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Ottawa, Canada. 28p.
0
Globalization N/a
In Newfoundland the fishery was the only occupational option for most women in fishing communities and they have had little if any experience in career planning. Women knew what they were going to do, and there was no need to look at alternatives. Since the cod fishing moratorium they have had to consider the alternatives and the prospect can be both frightening and challenging as women have a perceived responsibility to hold the family together and to regulate the balance between tradition and change in the communities. Until the psychological impacts of the moratorium are addressed many women may be unable to concentrate on their career options.
N. America
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Social Change,Role,Newfoundland,Income,Impact,Globalization,Fishing Communities,Employment,Culture,Cod,Canada,Globalisation
3
No
37
Slatter C. 1995. For Food or Foreign Exchange? Subsistence Fisheries and the Commercial Harvesting of Marine Resources in the Pacific. Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 137-147pp.
0
Globalization N/a
The author argues that placing emphasis on export-oriented fisheries production at the expense of subsistence fisheries, could have drastic effects on future food security, health and welfare of Pacific island people. Also argues that the subsistence fishery, in which common women predominate, is too often neglected and this reflects both a gender bias and a bias in the market.
Oceania
Women,Subsistence Fisheries,Role,Pacific Islands,Labour,Health,Gender,Food Security,Fisheries,Exports
3
No
38
Binkley M. 2000. Getting By’ in Tough Times - Coping with the Fisheries Crisis. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 323-332pp.
0
Globalization N/a
In response to the current fisheries crisis, Nova Scotian coastal fishing dependent households are scrambling to get by. In the past, these households relied on long-term financial planning strategies, but in these tough times those strategies are breaking down, and are being replaced by short-term coping mechanisms. These attempts to get by include changing household livelihood strategies such as spending and saving practices, and changing work patterns inside and outside the home, as well as within the household fishing enterprise. By restructuring their work fishing-dependent households hope that they can get by until the fishery bounces back.
N. America
Livelihood,Income,Fishing Communities,Employment,Coastal Fisheries,Canada
4
No
39
Davis D and Gerrard S. 2000. Gender and Resource Crisis in the North Atlantic Fisheries. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 279-286pp.
0
Globalization N/a
The article calls for more awareness on the impact of the North Atlantic fisheries crisis on women. It points to the need to develop, expand and refine a critical and feminist perspective.
Oceania
Women,Impact,Gender,Fisheries,Feminism,Development,Atlantic
3
No
40
Pettersen L T 1996. Crisis Management and Household Strategies in Lofoten: A Question of Sustainable Development. Sociol. Rural., Vol. 36, Issue 2. 236-248pp.
0
Globalization N/a
The paper examines the ways in which fishing families in Lofoten, Norway, responded to the cod crisis occurring at the end of the 1980s and to the changes in the regime of fisheries management. It asks whether the fishing population has experienced sustainable development. The vantage point is the study of household strategies in response to hostile changes in their environment, focusing on women’s roles within the fishing households.
Europe
Women,Sustainable Development,Social Change,Role,Resources Management,Population,Norway,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Resources,Fisheries Management,Fisheries Development,Economy,Cod
3
No
41
Skaptadóttir U D. 2000. Women Coping with Change in Icelandic Fishing Community. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 311-321pp.
0
Globalization N/a
In Iceland we find great commitment to market solutions in the fishery as exemplified by the individually transferable quota system (ITQ). This management system, along with the state’s diminishing commitment to regional planning, have had marked impact on the people who live in fishing communities. In this article, the author explores some of the consequences of these changes on women’s lives within a particular fishing village. The inhabitants of the village have not been able to take advantage of the new system in which fewer and larger companies are taking over. The coping mechanisms adopted by women stress community and working together whereas men respond more on an individual level. The already existing gender divisions within fishing communities underpin the different responses and coping strategies.
Europe
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Role,Quota,Policy,Markets,ITQ,Impact,Iceland,Gender,Fishing Companies,Fishing Communities
4
No
42
Overa R. 1998. Partners and Competitors: Gendered Entrepreneurship in Ghanaian Canoe Fisheries. Dissertation for the Dr. Polit. Degree, Department of Geography, University of Bergen. 362p.
0
Globalization N/a
The study analyzes the cultural, economic and social processes behind the apparently, unusually strong economic position of "fish mammies"—women fish traders in Ghana. These women invest in fishing equipment and become managers of fishing companies, crossing the gender-defined division of labour between fishing and marketing. One reason for this is changes in technology. The study discusses the struggles that these women face to acquire power in the predominantly patriarchal fishing sector. It points to the necessity of understanding men’s position in fisheries, in marriage, and in other fields of life while discussing women's change in position. The first four chapters of the book give an historical overview and define entrepreneurship as the crossing of gendered boundaries. The last chapter illustrates how women utilize resources outside the local context—foreign fish supply—in order to expand their fish-based enterprises and enhance their personal prestige.
Africa
Women,Technology,Socio-economic Aspects,Social Change,Role,Markets,Labour,Ghana,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fishing Companies,Development,Culture,Labor
5
No
43
ICSF. 1997. Globalization, Gender and Fisheries: Report of the Senegal Workshop on Gender Perspectives in Fisheries, ICSF, India. 54p.
0
Struggles and Movements,Globalization N/a
This dossier presents the report of the concluding workshop of the first phase of the Women in Fisheries programme of ICSF held in Rufisque, Senegal, in June1996. This workshop analyzed globally, the impact of the fisheries crises on gender relations in coastal communities, and the need for a feminist perspective for the evolution of sustainable fisheries policies. Women are central to the resilience, viability and sustainability of artisanal fishing communities. However, they continue to be largely marginalized from decision-making positions within fishworker organizations. The issues that they face as workers and as members of communities and societies are rarely addressed. The dossier has three sections. The first section includes presentations on national issues confronting fisherwomen and their organizing in twelve countries namely France, Spain, Ghana, Norway, Fiji, Brazil, Canada, Thailand, Philippines, India and Senegal. The second part of the workshop focuses on specific issues affecting women: global fisheries development, globalization and gender relations, strategies for struggle and patriarchy and development. The last part focuses on directions for the future. This dossier aims to create wider debate on this issue.
World
Women,Thailand,Subsistence Fisheries,Spain,Senegal,Reproductive Labour,Philippines,Norway,India,Impact,Globalization,Ghana,Gender,France,Fishworkers Organisation,Fisheries Resources,Fisheries Development,Fiji,Feminism,Employment Discrimination,Decision Making,Coastal Communities,Canada,Brazil,Artisanal Fisheries,Globalisation
4
No
44
Overa R. 1995. Entrepreneurial Women in Ghanian Canoe Fisheries: The Case of Fante Fishing Town Moree. Center for Development Studies, Norway.
0
Status of Women N/a
The book describes the vital inputs that an extended social and economic network gives in fishing, for women and men. Even though women increasingly own canoes, where previously only men used to do so, they do not compete for positions in the male power hierarchy. They "cross over" economically, but not socially, and do not challenge the social construction of gender in Fante culture. The book reflects on the two major cultural values that a full, worthy woman in Moree must have. One is to be economically independent, and the other is to give birth to children, reflecting her critical role in production and reproduction. The ways gender and kinship relations change according to the different stages of a woman's economic career, provides important insights into the internal dynamics in the canoe fisheries. They also provide insights in the construction, reproduction and manipulation of gender that are influenced by and influence economic and political change.
Africa
Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Social Change,Role,Politics,Labour,Income,Gender,Employment,Economy,Canoe,Labor
5
No
45
Morris L. 1979. Women Without Men: Domestic Organization and the Welfare State as seen in a Coastal Community of Puerto Rico. British Journal of Sociology, Volume 30, Issue No. 3. 322-340pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
The study revolves round El Bajo, the main settlement of a poor barrio, part of an economically depressed region, extending along the southeast section of the coast of Puerto Rico, where half the male household heads and 21 of 27 female-headed households are dependent on aid. Comparisons within El Bajo show that that there is an increase in unstable marriages associated with the introduction of assistance to single mothers, and decreased household instability with regular employment for men. This difference between 'good' and 'bad' marriages is polarized by the expansion of 'middle class' occupations, and the consequent emphasis on social mobility. A review of matrifocality in women-headed households indicates a variety of households masked by the term, now mostly associated with class and low status.
Latin America
Women,Social Issues,Role,Puerto Rico,Gender,Exclusion,Employment,Coastal Areas
2
No
46
Participation of women on the socio-economic development of fisheries sector. Research and communication Unit, National Fisheries Solidarity. Sri Lanka. 37p
0
Status of Women N/a
This research aims to measure the contribution of Sri Lankan fisher women in the fishery sector, as well as socially and economically. It outlines the various activities that constitute their role within fishing, family progress and relations, management of the house, social contact and community participation, family spirituality and decision-making, and the time taken for each. Though Sri Lankan fisherwomen have considerable control in decision-making, they also tend to work for more than 18 hours every day to fulfill their responsibilities, bearing an inordinate proportion of the work related to child-bearing and rearing.
Asia
Women,Sri Lanka,Socio-economic Aspects,Social Security,Social Development,Labour,Income,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Decision Making
3
No
47
Lambeth L. 2002. The life of a commercial fisherwoman. SPC Women In fisheries Information Bulletin 11, November 2002, New Caledonia. 36-37pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/News/WIF/WIF11/WIF11.pdf
Status of Women N/a
The author writes about the experiences of commercial fisherwomen. She returns to the sea from an office environment, thereby taking a working holiday, leaving behind computers and deadlines. She exercises her arm muscles by pulling in some of the big, fighting fish, the Spanish mackerel.
World
Women,Social Change,Fishing Industry,Employment,Commercial Fishing
3
No
48
Medard M. 2001. Women and Gender Participation in the Fisheries Sector in Lake Victoria: Global Symposium on Women in Fisheries. Sixth Asian fisheries forum, 29 November 2001, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. 155-169pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
The paper starts with an analysis of the gender roles of women in the fisheries sector. These roles are recognized in three stages of production: fishing, processing and marketing. Further, the paper looks at the impacts of gender roles in promoting or hindering the involvement of women in fisheries research, development, and management. Lastly, the paper develops recommendations that will ensure the effective participation of women in the management of Lake Victoria fisheries resources.
Africa
Women,Research and Development,Lake Victoria,Impact,Gender,Fisheries Resources,Fisheries Management,Fisheries,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Africa
4
No
49
Gerrard S, Balsvik R R. 1999. Global Coasts: Life Changes, Gender Challenges. Kvinnforsk University of Tromso Norway. 186p.
0
Status of Women N/a
The theme of this book is life and work along the coast of Norway and other coasts. Our focus shifts from the furthest frontier posts on the Barents Sea and the Arctic Ocean to the fjords of Finnmark and Nordland, then on to fishing villages and communities in Normandy and Newfoundland. We move from studies of women’s identity management, to women’s and men’s striving for the “good life” in a situation where work and community life are forever encountering new challenges. Through empirical descriptions and perspectives rooted for the most part in gender and women’s studies, the authors show just how diverse ways of life, identities and cultural processes past and present can be. These writers are also searching for interpretations, models and concepts that will give us a better grasp of life on the coast through the ages. We not only shift dramatically from coast to coast, but also between different views of women’s and men’s lives, and different research topics: from the local to the global, between tradition and modernity, between nature and culture, between academic models and interpretations based on experience, between interdisciplinary women’s studies and specialized disciplines. 
Europe
Social Change,Reproductive Labour,Norway,Labour,History,Gender,Fishing Village,Fishing Communities,Education,Culture,Coastal Fisheries
3
No
50
Cole S C. 1991. Women of the Praia: Work and Lives in a Portuguese Coastal Community. Princeton University Press, New Jersey, USA. 210pp.
0
Role of Women,Status of Women N/a
In this richly detailed, sensitive ethnographic work, Sally Cole takes as her starting point the firsthand accounts of five differently situated Portuguese women, who describe their lives in a rural fishing community on the north coast of Portugal. Skillfully combining these life stories with cultural and economic analysis, Cole radically departs from the picture of women as sexual beings that prevails in the anthropological literature of Europe and the Mediterranean. Her very different strategy—a focus on women as workers—reflects the Portuguese women's own definition of themselves and allows them the strong, resonant voice that is the goal of both the new ethnography and the feminist scholarship. From this new perspective, Cole proposes an important critique of the dominant paradigm of southern European gender relations as being embedded in the code of honour and shame. Covering the Salazar years, as well as the period since the 1974 Revolution, Cole shows that fisherwomen of the past enjoyed greater autonomy in work and social relations than do their daughters and granddaughters, who live in a context of increasing commoditization and industrialization. Central to this account is an examination of the changing structure and role of the household as economic production moved to the factory.
Europe
Women,Portugal,Gender,Fishing Communities,Feminism,Culture
4
No
51
Lefebure N. 1995. Femmes Océanes - Les Grandes Pionnières Maritimes. Glénat. 332pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
This article expands through the history on the increasing role of women as pioneers of the sea.
World
Women,Role,History,Fisheries
2
No
52
Lopez L, Lovesio B, Murguialday C and Varela C. 1992. Un Mar de Mujeres - Trabajadoras en la Industria de la Pesca. Grecmu, Ediciones Trilce. 141pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
This is a description of the fisheries sector in Uruguay and the progressive occult “feminization” of the sector. The strong demand for women is a consequence of shortage of capital and the necessity of manual work.
Europe
Women,Uruguay,Labour,Fisheries,Feminism,Empowerment,Capital
3
No
53
Davis D L and Nadel-Klein J. 1992. Gender, Culture, and the Sea: Contemporary Theoretical Approaches. Society and Natural Resources, Vol. 5, Issue 2. 135-147pp.
0
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
Social science studies of fishing communities have tended to be highly focused on male activities and to regard women’s work as domestic or as merely supplemental to that of men. This review article is intended to update the material presented in an earlier, more comprehensive essay on gender in the maritime literature. It examines some contemporary exceptions to this androcentric tendency, suggesting that understanding of local fisheries can be greatly enhanced by re-examining the role of gender in fishing communities and in fisheries production.
World
Women,Labour,Informal Sector,Gender,Fishing Communities,Empowerment,Labor
5
No
54
Keefe M-L and Young-Dubovsky C. 1996. Promoting Diversity in the Fisheries. Fisheries, Vol. 21, Issue 1. 14-15pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
The American workplace is changing. The 1950s image of the white male leaving the wife and family every morning to work his 9-to-5 job has been replaced by dual career families, non-traditional working hours, day care, single parents, and a more diverse workforce. Females and minorities are no longer limited to traditional jobs and professions. However, the fisheries profession, as part of the larger environmental science and resource management field, still fits the 1950s image well.
N. America
Women,USA,Social Issues,Role,Resources Management,Labour,Gender,Empowerment,Employment,Labor
2
No
55
Rettberg S, Alamu S O and Mdaihli M. 1995. Fisherwomen of Kainji Lake. Annual Report National Institute Freshwater Fisheries Resources, Vol. 1994, New Bussa, Nigeria. 190-194pp.
0
Role of Women,Status of Women N/a
The findings are presented of a survey conducted regarding the fisherwomen around Kainji Lake, Nigeria, in order to obtain data about the extent and structure of fishing activities of women. The information obtained indicates that women participate to a considerable extent in actual fishing activities. The number of women owning and operating fishing equipment is equal to that of men; the fishing intensity as well as the diversification of fishing gear is rather low. Women fish inshore more than offshore. The collection of data for catch statistics concentrates at present entirely on male fisherfolk; access to fisherwomen for data collection purposes is presently impossible because of the tradition that strangers are not allowed to talk to Muslim women. In order not to underestimate the catches, extrapolation from catches of male fisherfolk has to be done.
Africa
Women,Traditional Knowledge,Surveys,Participatory Management,Nigeria,Lakes,Lake Fisheries,Inshore Fisheries,Gender,Database
3
No
56
Shon T. 1998. Role of Women in Samoan Society: The Sacred Convenant. Extracted from: ‘Women and Rural Fisheries Development: A Case Study of Auala-Savaii’. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin, Issue 2, March 1998. 7-12pp.
0
http://home.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WiF2.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Status of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
This research discusses the role of women in traditional Samoan society. It also outlines a prawn project in Auala, a Samoan village, as a case study that demonstrates the value of women’s labour in sustaining Samoa’s marine environment as well as in contributing to the local economy and well-being. Finally, it draws attention to the complete exclusion of women in Samoa from the decision-making processes in the rural Fisheries Management Plan, and to the necessity of integrating their roles on the ground with the Plan.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Samoa,Role,Reproductive Labour,Policy,Marine Environment,Labour,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Management,Employment Discrimination,Economy,Ecology,Decision Making,Aquaculture,Reproductive Labor,Labor
2
No
57
Klein J N. 2000. Granny Baited the Lines - Perpetual Crisis and the Changing Role of Women in Scottish Fishing Communities. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 363-372pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
The extended North Atlantic fisheries crisis has greatly transformed the sexual division of labour along the coast of Scotland. Only a handful of places remain where virtually every household relies on fishing, and the Scottish fishery no longer depends heavily upon women’s work. However, even where fishing has ceased to be a primary resource base, the idea of fishing “heritage” remains a potential source of income. A number of the smaller east coast communities now depend upon tourism and touristic representations of the fisher past as much as, if not more so, than they do upon the fishery itself. Depictions of women feature prominently in fisher museums and heritage displays. This article explores the significance of gender representations for local identity management in the context of “perpetual crisis.”
Europe
Women,Tourism,Scotland,North Atlantic,Livelihood,Labour,Income,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fisheries,Empowerment,Employment
4
No
58
Miki N. 1999. A Study on the Working Status of Fisherwomen. Memoirs of the Faculty of Fisheries, Hokkaido University, Vol. 46, Issue 1. 101p.
0
Status of Women N/a
In recent years, the shortage of fishery male workers has become extremely serious in Japan. The objective of this study is to clarify how such a situation has affected the work of the wife of the fishing operator’s household.
Asia
Women,Labour,Japan,Fishworkers,Fishing Industry
3
No
59
Munk-Madsen E. 2000. Wife the Deckhand, Husband the Skipper - Authority and Dignity Among Fishing Couples. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 333-342pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
One response of small-scale fishing entrepreneurs in north Norway to the resource crisis of the 1990s has been the pooling of family labour to keep all potential profits from reduced quotas within the household and family unit. In their everyday practices of living and working together, these couples struggle to maintain economically viable lives through ecologically and socially sound fishing schemes. This article examines what happens in the power relationship between skipper and crew when women board a fishing vessel. Drawing on data from two case studies of wife/crew and husband/skipper relations, the author focuses on how the issue of skipper’s authority is dealt within the context of gender equality characteristic of Norwegian society and demonstrates how men’s authority is actively created by their wives as they fish together.
Europe
Socio-economic Aspects,Small Scale Fisheries,Resources Management,Quota,Norway,Labour,Gender,Fishing Vessels,Fishing Effort,Fisheries Resources,Ecology,Catch
3
No
60
Norr J L and Norr K F. 1992. Women’s Status in Peasant-level Fishing. Society and Natural Resources, Vol. 5, Issue 2. 149-163pp.
0
Status of Women N/a
The women of Minakuppam, a small hamlet of ocean-going fishermen located just outside the city of Madras in Tamil Nadu, India, are more active and less limited in their daily social activities and have more power than women in most Indian farming villages. This contrast is extended with evidence on women’s status in fishing and agricultural communities in other predominantly agrarian societies. Several crucial features of the political economy account for women’s status in these communities.
Asia
Women,Tamil Nadu,Social Development,Social Change,Role,Politics,India,Gender,Fishing Village,Fishing Communities,Economy
4
No
61
Choo P S, Hall S J and Williams M J (eds). 2006. Global Symposium on Gender and Fisheries: Seventh Asian Fisheries Forum 1-2 December 2004, Penang, Malaysia. 174p.
0
http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/Gender and Fisheries Dec 2004.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This is a collection of eighteen papers presented during the Global Symposium on Gender and Fisheries, Seventh Asian Fisheries Forum, 1-2 December 2004, in Penang Malaysia. Drawing on work undertaken around the globe, the papers in this volume represent a substantive contribution to the literature on the topic of gender and fisheries, expanding existing knowledge and highlighting gaps for future research. It is only through a more thorough understanding of gender-specific interactions that better interventions can be designed to ensure a sustainable and equitable distribution of the benefits that fisheries can provide. The papers are from the following countries: Vietnam, Bangladesh, Thailand, Lelepa Island, Philippines, India, Taiwan, Cambodia, Sri Lanka and Kiribati. The other articles include documenting women’s fisheries in Pacific Islands and valuing local knowledge in the Canadian Arctic.
World
Women,Vietnam,Traditional Knowledge,Traditional Fisheries,Thailand,Taiwan,Sri Lanka,Social Change,Philippines,Pacific Islands,Kiribati,India,Fisheries,Exclusion,Documentation,Canada,Cambodia,Bangladesh
4
No
62
Kusakabe K. 2003. Gender Issues in Small Scale Inland Fisheries in Asia: Women as an Important Source of Information. RAP Publication, Bangkok. 145p
0
http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/ad070e/ad070e08.htm#bm08
Role of Women,Status of Women N/a
Fishing has long been considered a male occupation and women were thought to be involved only in post-harvest activities. However, there is a growing recognition of women's contribution in capture fisheries in all activity spheres. This paper provides an overview of current studies that focus on women in fisheries and discusses the challenges faced in bringing gender perspectives into fisheries. It successfully attempts to address information on gender issues and statistics. The final section of this paper offers recommendations to better understanding of gender relations and the mechanisms of women’s' subordination.
Asia
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Statistics,Role,PHF,Gender,Fishing Industry,Empowerment,Capture Fisheries
4
No
63
Ram K. 1991. Mukkuvar Women. Gender, Hegemony and Capitalist Transformation in a South India Fishing Community. Allen and Unwin, Sydney, Australia. 266pp.
0
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This book explores the ambiguities and complexities of caste, religion, class and gender in the Catholic fishing community of the Mukkuvars, at the southernmost tip of the Indian subcontinent. These coastal villages have been shaped by distinctive elements: a history of colonization by Portugese Jesuits, the work of fishing, and an unusual sexual division of labour. In addition, the micro-politics of power within the villages is being redefined by the new place of the fishing industry within the world economic order. Against this background, the author traces the participation of Mukkuvar men and women in the construction of a culture that cannot be easily classified as Catholic or Hindu, peasant or proletarian. The broad scope of Mukkhuvar Women covers questions of gender and migration, capitalist development, goddess worship, healing, and the consciousness of minorities. These issues are discussed through a variety of critical approaches. In her analysis the author draws on Marxist, feminist and anthropological methodologies, while evaluating blind spots in each canon.
Asia
Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Politics,Labour,India,Globalization,Globalisation,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Culture,Labor,Coastal Villages
4
No
64
Bringmann N. 1996. Ideals and Reality: Women Fish Vendors in a South Indian Village. Occasional Paper no. 62, Nijmegen: Third World Centre/Development Studies, Catholic University of Nijmegen.
0
Status of Women N/a
The paper is based on conversations with female fish vendors in a fishing village in the Southern Indian State of Kerala. It discusses the social position and identity of these women within their caste.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Kerala,India,Income,Employment
3
No
65
Rubinoff J A. 2000. Fishing for Status - Impact of Development on Goa's Fisherwomen. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 22, Issue 6. 631-644pp.
0
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
An ignored but significant group in the local economy, female vendors of the traditional Kharvi fishing community in Goa, India have, in many ways, benefited from recent fisheries development. Rather than being “victims” of technological development that has focused on fishermen, many Goan Catholic fisherwomen, in contrast to their Hindu counterparts, have made an economically successful transition from “barefoot, headload peddlers” in the villages to market entrepreneurs, working in small co-operative groups.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Technology,Social Development,Social Change,Role,India,Goa,Fishworker Cooperatives,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Development,Fish Marketing,Economy
5
No
66
Ifeka C. Women in Fisheries - Why Women Count: Prospects for Self-reliant Fisheries Development in the South Pacific Compared to the Indian Ocean. 89-111pp.
0
http://books.google.com/books?id=chc-AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA89&lpg=PA89&dq=women+in+fisheries+why+women+count+prospects+for+%22self+reliant%22+fisheries+development+in+the+south+pacific+compared+to+the+indian+
Role of Women N/a
This essay is based on the field enquires of the author in Kiribati, Maldives and Southwest India. The author points out that the greater role that Kiribati fisherwomen have in fishing and fish processing creates greater potential for self-reliant development in artisanal fisheries when compared with the women in the other two communities, whose roles in the sector and community are more circumscribed. She looks at the overall contribution that Kiribati fisherwomen make to the fisheries sector as well as within the household, in the context of changing markets from subsistence to cash economies. She also outlines the traditional fishing and fish processing techniques that they use.
Asia
Women,Technology,Reproductive Labour,Markets,Maldives,Kiribati,India,Fishing Communities,Fish Processing,Fish Harvesting,Exclusion,Empowerment,Economy,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
67
Allut A G. 2000. Gender and Artisanal Fisheries in Galicia. International Workshop on Globalization, Gender and the Fisheries, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, 5-12 May 2000. 14p.
0
Role of Women N/a
This paper was presented at the International Workshop on Globalization, Gender and the Fisheries, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, in May 2000. It is based on research carried out by the author in the coastal context of Galicia. He outlines the social and economic characteristics of fishing, artisanal fishing practices and the role of women in fisheries.
Europe
Women,Spain,Socio-economic Aspects,Role,Exclusion,Coastal Areas,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
68
Kinch J. 2003. Marine Mollusc Use Among the Women of Brooker Island, Louisiade Archipelago, Papua New Guinea. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 13, December 2003, New Caledonia. 5-14pp.
0
http://home.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF13/WIF13.pdf
Role of Women N/a
Brooker Islanders use approximately 5000 sq km of sea territory—an extensive and diverse marine environment. Their livelihoods, identity and culture is dependent on this environment. This paper outlines the ecological relationship and understanding that Brooker women have about marine life, particularly molluscs.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Territorial Sea,Role,Marine Environment,Livelihood,Islands,Gender,Fishing Communities,Exclusion,Ecology,Culture
2
No
69
Novaczek I. 2003. Socioeconomic Status of Fishing Communities - Seaweed: A Promising Option for Women's Small Business Development in the Pacific Region. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 13, December 2003, New Caledonia. 17-18pp.
0
http://home.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF13/WIF13.pdf
Role of Women N/a
In Fiji, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea, women convert marine plants [sea weed], an underutilized but locally abundant resource, into saleable market products. The author of this article emphasizes the importance of seaweed as both supplementary food as well as medicine, and the potential that this use has for womens' small-scale business development in the Pacific region.
Latin America
Women,Vanuatu,Small Scale Fisheries,Seaweed,PNG,Pacific,Nutrition,Medicine,Markets,Food Products,Fiji,Exclusion,Development
3
No
70
Kronen M. 2002. The Lakemba Art of Vono. SPC Women In fisheries Information Bulletin 11, November 2002, New Caledonia. 33-36pp.
0
http://home.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF11/WIF11.pdf
Role of Women N/a
On Lakemba, a small island in the southern Lau Group of Fiji Islands, women from the villages of Nasaqalau and Waitabu traditionally catch fish using a method called vono. Although this method is considered an easy way to catch fish, it requires a substantial amount of effort and patience. This article describes the fishing process.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Role,Islands,Fishing Village,Fishing Methods,Fishing Effort,Fiji
3
No
71
Antoine C. 2001. Crabs are Women’s Business. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 8, March 2001, New Caledonia. 14-16pp.
0
http://home.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF8/WIF8-color.pdf
Role of Women N/a
In New Caledonia, the largest mangrove swamps are located on the west coast and in the northern part of the main island. Mud crabs live in shallow (0–10 m) soft mud or sand and mud sea bottoms associated with mangroves. It is the women who usually go crab hunting. This article explains the routines of women who go crab hunting, the seasons when it is possible, the size of the crabs caught (soft shelled, with eggs) etc. The article also lists a few interesting recipes.
Europe
Women,Traditional Fisheries,New Caledonia,Mangroves,Food Products,Crab,Catch
2
No
72
The Fisher Woman of Futuna. 1999. Extracted from SPC Community Fisheries Section Travel Report for Wallis and Futuna, (unpublish.). SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 5, September 1999. 20-22pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF_5.pdf
Role of Women N/a
The territory of Wallis and Fatuna lies 600 km northeast of Fiji and 300 km west of Samoa. In Futuna, women are involved in fishing as well as reef gleaning, while the men are predominantly involved with gardens in the surrounding higher regions. This article focuses on women's fishing practice and marketing.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Pacific,Food Security,Fish Marketing
2
No
73
Begossi A. 2002. Women in Brazilian Fisheries - Considering Livelihood and Resilience. Paper presented at a meeting on Gender in fisheries and aquaculture, Brussels, 9-10 December 2002, European Commission. 24p.
0
ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/inco/docs/07alpina_format.pdf
Role of Women N/a
Women activities from 9 Atlantic Forest communities and 7 Amazonian river stretches are analyzed. Areas studied include the coast of Rio de Janeiro State and Sao Paulo State , which have been visited in different years, since 1986. Amazonian areas include communities from the Aaguaia Tocantins Basin and from the Upper Jurua Extractive Reserve. Fieldwork was conducted at these areas between 1987-1997, where data were collected through interviews. The economic activities of women include slash and burn agriculture, household/child care, manioc processing, handicraft, plant collecting fishing and tourist house keeping, among others. At some sites, such as at Buzios Island (AF coast), young women avoid agricultural activities and concentrate on house and childcare. At other sites such as Jaguanum Island and at Picinguaba (AF coast), tourism has pushed women to work as housekeepers. Amazonian sites show similar trends, but some women also fish for subsistence. Propositions for local management seldom include women activities, but women may play an important role in traditional medicine, culture diffusion, food processing and trade. An approach based on multiple resource use, and taking resilience as an analytical tool, among other ecological concepts, is proposed.
Latin America
Women,Traditional Medicine,Tourism,Latin America,Labour,Income,Food Processing,Economy,Ecology,Culture,Amazon
3
No
74
South G R. 1995. Edible Seaweeds: An Important Source of Food and Income to Indigenous Fijians. In Fishing for Answers - Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 43-47pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
Describes each of the seven species of edible seaweed available in Fiji. The description includes: name, method of harvest, location, price and method of preparation for eating. Mentions that Fijian women and girls are the key people involved in collection, marketing and preparation of these seaweeds.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Seaweed,Markets,Food Products,Fiji
3
No
75
Taniera T and Mitchell J. 1995. Notes from Kiribati (August 1992). Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 28-32pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
This is a collection of information on women’s fishing in Kiribati. Women have a central socio-economic and cultural role in fishing in both the subsistence and cash sectors. Through the seemingly marginal activity of gleaning, women contribute significantly to meeting nutritional needs of their families. There is a need for specificity in defining women’s work in fishing for there are key differences in activities that occur on reef and lagoon islands.
Oceania
Working Conditions,Women,Traditional Fisheries,Subsistence Fisheries,Socio-economic Aspects,Reproductive Labour,Reef Fisheries,Nutrition,Lagoon,Labour,Kiribati,Culture,Reproductive Labor,Labor
2
No
76
Tiraa-Passfield A. 1995. Fishing Activities of Women of the Suva Pony Club Squatter Settlement, Fiji. Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Iedited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 33-41pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
Study on subsistence fishing carried out by women in a squatter settlement in the urban environment of Suva. Squatters settlements for people coming from the rural areas rely heavily on the surrounding environment for resources, such as seafood that can be gleaned from the mudflats and other marine resources. Sometimes these resources are overexploited and the marine environment may be contaminated.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Subsistence Fisheries,Seafood,Overcapacity,Marine Environment,Fisheries Resources,Ecology,Contamination
2
No
77
Ahmed K K, Rahman S and Chowdhury M A K. 1999. Role of Tribal women in Reservoir Fisheries of Bangladesh. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 4, Issue 1. 12-15pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
A discussion is presented on the emerging role played particularly by the tribal women in activities related to reservoir fisheries in Bangladesh. It is based on a primary survey that identified women’s roles in fishing, marketing and post-harvest activities of reservoir fisheries. The study was in two stages: the first covered 493 fishers in four major fishing grounds of Kaptai reservoir, and the second covered 100 fish retailers in the major markets.
Asia
Women,Social Change,Role,Reservoir Fisheries,PHF,Markets,Labour,Fishing Grounds,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Bangladesh,Labor
2
No
78
Alamu S O and Mdaihli M. 1995. Socio-economic Survey of Women in Artisanal Fisheries in Kainji Lake Area: A Case Study of Wawu. Annual Report National Institute Freshwater Fisheries Resources, Vol. 1994, New Bussa, Nigeria. 195-203pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
The findings are presented of a survey conducted in the village of Wawu, Nigeria, to document the role of women in the various activities they conduct in the artisanal fisheries of Kainji Lake. The participation of women in social and economic activities are strictly moderated by religious injunctions. It is recommended that definite extension messages that focus attention on the activities in which women are engaged inside their fenced compounds should be formulated and passed on to the women by female extension workers.
Africa
Socio-economic Aspects,Policy,Nigeria,Lakes,Lake Fisheries,Labour,Empowerment,Economy,Culture,Artisanal Fisheries,Labor
2
No
79
Bhaumik U, Pandit P K and Chatterjee J G. 1993. Involvement of Women in the Development of Inland Fisheries. Environment and Ecology, Vol. 11, Issue 3. 641-644pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
An investigation was carried out in five districts of West Bengal to involvement of women in inland fisheries development. A total of 201 women was interviewed at random with a schedule. Participation of women in net weaving was found to be the most preferred job and majority of them earned between Rs100 and 200 per month, which supplemented family income for better living.
Asia
Women,West Bengal,Participatory Management,Nets,Net Making,Living Conditions,Inland Fisheries,India,Income,Empowerment,Employment
2
No
80
Pisua L and Leonardo A. 1998. Peruvian Fisheries: Women Can Fish Too. SAMUDRA Report Issue 21, December 1998, India. 33-35pp
http://www.icsf.net/images/samudra/pdf/english/issue_21/80_art09.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
A description is given of some of the findings of a study carried out in southern Peru to investigate the role of women in the artisanal fishery sector. The work of women in the processing and marketing segments is widely recognized, however as far as fishing is concerned, women are still highly restricted, equally by the machismo which exists amongst their fellow fishers as by the maritime authorities who will not provide them with licenses to fish.
Oceania
Women,Policy,Peru,Licence,Labour,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Employment Discrimination,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
81
Radhakrishnan N. 1994. The Role of Fisherwomen in the Bêche-de-mer Industry. Proceedings of the National Workshop on Bêche-de-mer, CMFRI Bulletin 46, Cochin, India. 99-100pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
The bêche-de-mer industry is essentially a cottage industry. Men are engaged in going out into sea and diving for the material. At some places women and children are engaged in collecting holothurians during low tide from muddy flats. After men return from sea the work can be taken over by women in degutting and boiling holothurians. The active participation of fisherwomen in this foreign exchange earning industry will certainly improve both the industry and the financial conditions of the fisherwomen.
World
Women,PHF,Markets,Labour,Income,Fishing Industry,Fisheries Trade,Fish Processing,Exports,Conditions of Life,Children,Beche de Mer,Artisanal Fisheries,Labor
2
No
82
Thomas M, Balasubramaniam S and Kandoran M K. 1996. Role Performance of Fisherwomen and the Associated Variables. Fish. Technol. Soc. Fish. Technol., Vol. 33, Issue 1, India. 51-57pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
The major roles performed by fisherwomen and the average time spent on these roles are analyzed. While pre-processing and fresh fish marketing are major roles performed by fisherwomen in Kerala, fresh fish marketing and fishing net fabrication are major roles for fisherwomen from Tamil Nadu villages.
Asia
Women,Tamil Nadu,Role,Net Making,Labour,Kerala,India,Gender,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Labor
2
No
83
Kailola P J. 2006. Vanuatu - Technical Report: An Assessment of the Role of Women in Fisheries in Vanuatu. FAO Technical Report 2, FAO, Bangkok, Thailand.
0
Role of Women N/a
In Vanuatu, fishing is a secondary activity. This is, however, changing with the transformation of the subsistence economy to cash economy, where fish is now beginning to be viewed as a source of cash. In coastal areas of Vanuatu, women fish near the shore: reef or mud flat gleaning, and fishing lines. The status of women in Vanuatu is often secondary to that of men, decision-making at home and in the community is often by men and their working hours far exceed those of their male counterparts, while their subsistence work is invisibilized. The author gives a detailed account on the status of women fishers, fishing practices and their role in the fisheries sector, as well as the government and non-governmental programmes and organizations that support them. She also outlines recommendations so as to accommodate the needs of women and communities in developing national fisheries plans and policies.
Asia
Women,Vanuatu,Subsistence Fisheries,Role,Reproductive Labour,Policy,Labour,Government,Food Security,Fishing Communities,Employment Discrimination,Economy,Decision Making,Conditions of Work,Coastal Areas,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
84
Tungpalan M T V, Mangahas M F and Palis M P E. Women in Fishing Villages: Role and Potential for Coastal Resource Management. Proceedings of the ASEAN/US technical workshop on integrated coastal zone management, 28-31 October 1988, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ICLARM, Manila Philippines. 237-243pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
This research study on Filipino fisherwomen focuses on the major contributions of women in sustaining fishing households and in economic-political activities in fishing communities. The study elaborates how women cope with the double pressure caused by their traditional gender roles and their increasing economic activities.
Asia
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Sustainable Fisheries,Socio-economic Aspects,Role,Politics,Philippines,Patriarchy,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries,Economy,Artisanal Fisheries
4
No
85
Kronen M. 2003. Gender in Fisheries and Aquaculture: Social Capital and Knowledge for the Transition Towards Sustainable Use of Aquatic Ecosystems - Case Studies from Tonga and Fiji - South Pacific. 13p.
0
Role of Women N/a
This research examines the changing roles of women and men in the fishing sector in reef and lagoon fisheries. This sector has gained importance for food security in a context where cash incomes are increasingly important. The article gives gender-wise data on fishing practices in the Tonga and Fiji, and draws attention to the roles that women play in maintaining household cash and food requirements.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Sustainable Fisheries,Socio-economic Aspects,Role,Reef Fisheries,Politics,Philippines,Lagoon,Labour,Income,Gender,Food Security,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Empowerment,Employment,Economy
3
No
86
Vunisea A. 2007. Women’s Changing Participation in the Fisheries Sector in Pacific Island Countries. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 16, March 2007, New Caledonia. 24-27pp.
0
http://home.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF16/WIF16.pdf
Role of Women N/a
Women fisherfolk in Pacific Island countries continue to live within traditionally defined community norms and carry out their traditional and social roles. In addition, now they undertake work in the changing market economy. In the fisheries sector, women undertake many kinds of activities: fishing, preparation of fishing activities, processing and distribution. Often their involvement, particularly in inland fishing, is under-reported because it is seen as an extension of their traditional subsistence food foraging role. This activity has also come under threat because of development activities that cut off resource access. Men tend to own assets [boats and nets] even if it is the women who undertake the fishing activity. Some change is now noticed in a few communities, with traditional institutions that have begun to recognize women’s leadership roles because of changes in education, economic standing or employment status.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Communities,Subsistence Fisheries,Socio-economic Aspects,Role,PHF,Pacific Islands,Inland Fisheries,Informal Sector,Food Security,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Employment Discrimination,Education,Economy
4
No
87
Vunisea A. 1997. Women’s Fishing Participation in Fiji (with emphasis on women’s fisheries knowledge and skills). SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 1, October 1997, New Caledonia. 10-13pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WiF1.pdf
Role of Women N/a
As in other Pacific Islands, women in Verata dominate in the subsistence fishing sector, with increasing involvement in the local commercial fishery. In addition to significant contributions to the nutrition requirements of their homes, women fishers actively participate in the market economy with the commercialization of previously subsistence target species. Women face two disadvantages. In the traditional context, they were predominantly disadvantaged by conventional restrictions or taboos with their subsistence fishing activities invisibilized under household work, and in the changing economical condition, where fishing is shifting from subsistence to serving markets, women’s labour has increased without a corresponding increase in acknowledgement and status. Official documentation, for instance, still does not account for their participation in markets and overlooks it. Further, their traditional sustainable fishing practices that acted as a safeguard against misuse or over-exploitation of resources, are now being bypassed. The article documents the traditional practices that women employ and concludes by stating the need to understand and promote fishing methods that women use; include them in decision-making processes; and support the increase of their capacities.
Oceania
Women,Target Species,Subsistence Fisheries,Pacific Islands,Overcapacity,Nutrition,Markets,Labour,Food Security,Fishing Methods,Employment Discrimination,Economy,Documentation,Decision Making,Commercial Fishing
4
No
88
Fay-Sauni L, Vuki V C and Sauni S. 1998. A Review of Women in Fisheries: with specific reference to Kiribati and Fiji. Research Paper for the Marine Studies Programme, University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji.
0
Role of Women N/a
In the history of fisheries in the Pacific region, women’s activities are either overlooked as domestic work or strictly confined to those requiring low-technology such as basic gleaning on reef or coastal shallow habitats. Over time, with the influence of western traditions including the drive towards monetization and the declining trend in coastal and marine resources, more women now actively participate in fishing activities on a part-time or full-time basis. As a consequence, traditional barriers between the genders continually erode among most societies in the region. This review highlights some aspects of this shift from subsistence to artisanal commercial fishing among women in the Pacific region and its consequences with specific references to Kiribati and Fiji.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Technology,Subsistence Fisheries,Pacific Islands,Marine Resources,Labour,Kiribati,Gender,Fiji,Empowerment,Ecology,Coastal Resources,Artisanal Fisheries,Labor
2
No
89
Alamu S O. 1993. The Role of Women Fish Mongers on Commercial Fish Handling and Marketing in Jebba Lake Basin. Annual Report, National Institute for Freshwater Fisheries Resources, Vol. 1992, New Bussa, Nigeria. 152-162pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
This survey, covering the role of women in fish handling and marketing in Jebba Lake basin, Nigeria, indicates that although women are mostly involved in these activities, the economic returns from their efforts are marginal due to poor handling and distribution of fish. Women should, therefore, be encouraged and enlightened in improved methods of fish handling and distribution. All this can be achieved through effective fisheries extension education, establishment of pilot projects and encouraging them to form co-operative societies.
Africa
Women,Training,Socio-economic Aspects,Nigeria,Lakes,Lake Fisheries,Fishworker Cooperatives,Fish Marketing,Education
2
No
90
Yahaya J. 1988. The Role, Status and Income-earning Activities of Women in Small-scale Fisheries, Peninsular Malaysia. FAO/UNDP Project on Assistance to the Malaysian Fisheries Development Authority. MAL/86/005 Technical Report 6, FAO and UNDP, Rome. 62p
0
Role of Women N/a
This study examines the role and status of women in the rural sector in Malaysia, their economic contribution and participation. Given the recent concern to fully utilize women’s economic potential, and integrate their role in development, this study also explores the main avenues of gainful employment for rural women. It focuses on women in the fisheries sector, especially those in small-scale fishing communities.
Asia
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Role,Malaysia,Income,Employment,Economy,Development
4
No
91
Lambeth L et al. 2001. An Overview of the involvement of women in fisheries activities in Oceania. Global Symposium on Women in Fisheries. Sixth Asian fisheries forum, 29th November 2001. Kaohsiung, Taiwan. 127-142pp
0
Role of Women N/a
In the Pacific Islands, an estimated 70 to 80 per cent of the catch from inshore fisheries is used for subsistence purposes. It is uncertain what percentage of that is taken by women, although a recent study in Samoa found that 18 per cent of all village fishers are female, who harvest around 23 per cent of the total weight of seafood. Aside from traditional activities such as inshore harvesting and seafood processing for the family, women are becoming increasingly active in small businesses involving marine resources. Australia and New Zealand possess established commercial fishing industry sectors, and women's involvement in fisheries in those two countries tends to be different from the largely subsistence and artisanal involvement of women in the majority of Pacific Island countries and territories. Countries with large-scale, on-shore processing facilities show a relatively large percentage of women employed in the commercial fishing industry–in New Zealand about 34 per cent of the fishing industry workforce is women. This paper brings together information from the vast region of Oceania, including Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, Australia and New Zealand. It also examines research and development needs; government policies with regard to women's role in fisheries; and constraints that affect women's involvement in fisheries management and development in Oceania.
Oceania
Women,Subsistence Fisheries,Seafood Processing,Research and Development,Policy,PHF,Pacific Islands,New Zealand,Micronesia,Marine Resources,Labour,Inshore Fisheries,Government,Gender,Food Security,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,Fish Harvesting,Commercial Fishing,Australia,Artisanal Fisheries
4
No
92
Schoeffel P. 1995. Women in Fisheries in the Pacific Islands: A Retrospective Analysis. Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 7-28pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
Women’s fishing is associated with subsistence, domestic production, and small-scale produce marketing. Overview of the obstacles and the role of women in commercial fishery, aquaculture and conservation, and recommendations on how to help women.
Oceania
Women,Subsistence Fisheries,Small Scale Fisheries,Reproductive Labour,Food Security,Fish Marketing,Ecology,Conservation,Commercial Fishing,Aquaculture
2
No
93
Bhaumik U, Pandit P K and Chatterjee J G. 1990. Participation of Fisherwomen in Inland Fisheries Activities - Perceived Problems and Measures. Environment and Ecology, Vol. 8, Issue 2. 713-716pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
The study was undertaken in five districts of West Bengal to identify socio-economic problems as perceived by rural women-folk which impeded their participation in various inland fisheries activities. To mitigate the problems they suggested some measures to overcome them.
Asia
Women,West Bengal,Socio-economic Aspects,Participatory Management,Inland Fisheries,India,Gender
2
No
94
Tana T S. 1998. Women in Aquaculture Research and Development in Three Asian Countries. Cambodia: Women in Fisheries Education, Research and Development. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 3, Issue 4. 16p.
0
Role of Women N/a
Women have been deprived of good education, improved status, and active participation in development due to the cultural barrier that existed in traditional Cambodian society. However, the situation is rapidly changing, and in recent years emphasis has been laid on providing opportunities for women’s participation in all sectors of fisheries.
Asia
Women,Social Change,Participatory Management,Labour,Education,Development,Culture,Cambodia,Labor
2
No
95
Yahaya J. 1994. Determinants of Women’s Economic Participation in the Small-scale Fisheries Sector, Peninsular Malaysia. Naga, Vol. 17, Issue 1, Manila. 46-48pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
This paper specifically examines the main determinants of women’s participation in income-earning activities in Peninsular Malaysian small-scale fisheries.
Asia
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Participatory Management,Malaysia,Income
3
No
96
Brown J. 2007. Fishing for Tourists: Women Play Leadership Roles in Lagoon Management. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 16, March 2007, New Caledonia. 27pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF16/WIF16.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This article gives a brief account of Cooks Island fisheries. The small-scale sector has limited opportunities for participation by both men and women, though the sector is dominated by men. Women have now begun to take a more prominent role in protecting coastal fisheries.
Oceania
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Resources Management,Ecology,Cooks Is,Conservation,Coastal Fisheries
3
No
97
Malm T. 2007. Bendable Facts: A Note on the Division of Labour in Tonga. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 16, March 2007, New Caledonia. 3-9pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF16/WIF16.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
Gender entails the socio-cultural construction and interpretation of masculinity and femininity. It defines fundamental relations of power in forming individual and collective identity, and its meaning and value in the fabric of society. This article describes gender role patterns in a Tongan island. A remarkable aspect of labour division here is that men’s work includes agriculture: a typically feminine task in this region. The article explores the historical evolution of this gender role stereotyping. Pre-contact skeletal research indicates that women worked in the gardens and men went fishing in the sea. According to one hypothesis, this shifted when the Tongan islands became centralized and tightly organized under the high chiefs so that inter-tribal strife could be more easily managed. Another argument is that this pattern did not emerge until during the 19th century, under missionary influence, and during the civil war when it would have been dangerous for women to work outside the home.
Oceania
Women,Tonga,Social Issues,Labour,Labor,History,Gender,Culture
2
No
98
Lambeth L. 2002. The Life of a Commercial Fisherwoman. SPC Women In fisheries Information Bulletin 11, November 2002, New Caledonia. 34-36pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF11/WIF11.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
The author writes about the experiences of commercial fisherwomen. She returns to the sea from an office environment, thereby taking a working holiday, leaving behind computers and deadlines. She exercises her arm muscles by pulling in some of the big, fighting fish, the Spanish mackerel.
Women,Social Change,Reproductive Labour,Fishing Industry,Employment,Commercial Fishing
3
No
99
Nayak N. 1992. A Struggle Within the Struggle: An Experience of a Group of Women. PCO, Trivandrum. 78p.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
The 1980s in India saw the rise and growth of the fishworkers movement demanding the right to their survival and questioning the fisheries policy of the State. Within this context, the struggle of women also gained relevance. What role have they played in the sector and community and how do they see the future? The book gives a snapshot of struggles of village women in a fishing village in South India torn between the demands of traditional female roles and their desire to be free human beings; and adverse reactions from men to this desire. It documents the process of development of a feminist consciousness of a group of activists on the one hand, and of the women of the community on the other.
Asia
Women,Social Issues,India,Human Rights,Fishworker Movements,Fishing Village,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Policy,Feminism,Development,Conflicts
4
No
100
Sen S et al. 1991. Gender issues in fisheries and aquaculture including proceedings of the workshop on enhanced women's participation in fisheries development. Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, 4-7 December, 1990. 132p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
The report describes critical issues vis a vis integrating gender concerns in development activities in the fisheries sector. One central focus of the workshop was to identify strategies to enhance the role of women in fisheries and aquaculture development, keeping in mind the fact that women are socio-economically differentiated and face constraints while accessing and controlling resources. The proceedings contain case studies from Ivory Coast, Zambia, Kenya, Nigeria, Lake Tanganyika, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Malawi and Lake Kivu.
Africa
Zimbabwe,Zambia,Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Malawi,Lakes,Lake Fisheries,Labour,Kenya,Ivory Coast,Employment Discrimination,Development,Aquaculture,Africa
3
No
101
Nayak N. 1986. Impact of the Changing Pattern of Fish Vending by Women in the Fishing Community. Emerging Trends in Small-scale Fisheries Series. Indian Council of Social Science Research, New Delhi. 41p.
0
Role of Women N/a
The study looks into the pattern of fish marketing in which women traditionally engage through two decades (1960-1980) and their struggle for survival. This study has been conducted in four villages in the district of Trivandrum. Trivandrum is the capital city of Kerala, a South Indian State. In 1984 Trivandrum accounted for 15 per cent of the total fish catch of Kerala. 64 per cent of this catch was auctioned. Women fish sellers sold 69 per cent of this catch by carrying it on their heads and hawking it. This labour is informal.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Traditional Fisheries,Survival,Labour,Kerala,Informal Sector,India,Fish Marketing,Catch,Auction
4
No
102
Mbenga A. 1996. Marketing and Distribution of Artisanal Fisheries in the Gambia: "Women as fish protein suppliers in the Gambia". Thesis submitted for Master degree in Fishery Science, Norwegian College of Fisheries Science, University Tromso, Norway. 103p.
0
Role of Women N/a
This thesis, based on the artisanal fisheries sector of The Gambia, focuses on the role of men and women in the marketing and distribution of fish and fish products. It discusses the possibilities for increasing domestic fish supply, various types of processing technologies like smoking and drying, and the role of of banabanas—-the intermediaries or the middlemen. In particular, the author focuses on the role of women in the artisanal fisheries sector, its socio-cultural dimensions and the barriers they face in fish marketing.
Africa
Women,Vendors,Technology,Socio-economic Aspects,Labour,Gender,Gambia,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Drying,Culture,Artisanal Fisheries
4
No
103
Gadagkar R S. 1992. Women in Indian Fisheries. Proceedings of the Workshop on Women in Indian Fisheries, 27 May 1990. Special publication NO-8, Asian Fisheries Society, Indian Branch, Mangalore, India. 51pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
The thirteen papers in this publication mainly deal with the problems faced by women in their traditional roles of fish marketing and processing in the south and west coast of India. Fisherwomen experience gender discrimination at work and at home. They encounter problems due to the growing mechanization in fishing and in net manufacturing.
Asia
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Net Making,Mechanisation,Labour Standards,Labour,India,Gender,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Employment Discrimination,Displacement
3
No
104
Josupeit H. Women in the Fisheries Sector of Argentina, Uruguay and Southern Brazil. FAO Fisheries Circular, No. 992. Rome, FAO. 2004. 38p.
0
Role of Women N/a
In response to the recommendation of the first focal point meeting of the Latin American Network of Women in Fisheries (LANWF), FAO commissioned three studies on the role of women in fisheries in the southeastern part of the American continent, in Argentina (Patagonia and Mar del Plata), Uruguay and Brazil (Rio Grande do Sul). This work resulted in three major studies available in Spanish only on the webpage of INFOPESCA www.infopesca.org. This FAO Fisheries Circular summarizes the main findings of the three studies, to make the outcomes of the studies available on a broader basis. In the processing industry studied, the number of women exceeds the number of male staff. The number of women increases with the degree of complexity of the processing job. Women are considered by plant owners as more capable of carrying out precise tasks. It was generally noted that a high share of women’s salary is used for the purchase of food. Therefore, the creation of jobs in the processing industry will improve food security in the local countries.
Latin America
Women,Uruguay,Reproductive Labour,Livelihood,Latin America,Labour,Income,Food Security,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,FAO,Brazil,Argentina
4
No
105
IFAD. 1999. Sao Tome and Principe: Women Fish Traders. Democratic Republic of Sao Tome and Principe: Participatory Smallholder Agriculture and Artisanal Fisheries Development Programme, Inception Paper, Appendix I, Participatory Socio-Economic Analysis. Rome.
0
Role of Women N/a
It is estimated that about 23,000 people, or about 17 per cent of the population in Sao Tome and Principe are involved in the fisheries sector. Women play an important role in this work: buying fish directly from fishermen when they land, processing [drying, salting] the fish, transporting it and selling it. They are called palayes. They are often the wives of the fishermen. In addition to this, women may also raise and barter / sell surplus meat, chicken and eggs as well as grow vegetables and fruits. They are often powerful within the community and might even act as informal moneylenders to the fishermen. In addition, they might form associations to reduce operating costs through shared use of fish drying and bulk purchase of salt. Four main palayes associations are members of the national association of fishermen.
Africa
Women,Vendors,Socio-economic Aspects,Social Change,Sao Tome et Principe,PHF,Labour,Income,Fish Marketing,Community Development
3
No
106
Martin A-D. 1994. Les Ouvrières de la Mer. Histoire des Sardinières du Littoral Breton. Collection Chemin de la Mémoire, L’Harmattan, Paris. 75pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
The author deals with the sardine canners of Douarnenez (Britanny, France), and explains the importance of the work of these women. She tells us of their relations with the factory, religion, men and money.
Europe
Women,Sardine,PHF,Labour,Income,France,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,Empowerment,Culture,Canning
3
No
107
Alamu S O. 1991. Assessment of Women Contribution to Fishing Industry and Fish Marketing in Kainji Lake Basin. Annual Report National Institute for Freshwater Fisheries Research, Vol. 1990, New Bussa, Nigeria. 184-190pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
This survey shows that there are many post-harvest activities in the fishing industry of the Kainji Lake basin in Nigeria in which women are expected to contribute substantially in order to raise the living standard of the family. Efforts should be geared towards assisting women in participating in post-harvest activities which can raise their living standard.
Africa
Women,Surveys,PHF,Nigeria,Living Conditions,Income,Fishing Industry,Employment
2
No
108
Das S K. 1997. The Khasi Women and Their Role in Fish Marketing. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 2, Issue 4. 39-40pp.
0
Role of Women N/a
A brief discussion is presented on the role that the Khasi women of Meghalaya, India, play in the marketing of fresh fish, considering also the various problems they face, such as lack of cold storage facilities and appropriate fish preservation technologies, escalating cost of fish transportation and frequent strikes.
Asia
Women,Transportation,Technology,Reproductive Labour,Preservation,Meghalaya,Informal Sector,India,Fishing Communities,Fish Marketing,Cold Storage
2
No
109
APRN. 2005. Statement from Asian Women's Consultation on Post-tsunami Challenges, Aceh, July 25-27, 2005.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
This statement by 60 women survivors of the tsunami and activists from India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Malaysia, brings to attention the fact that marginalization, discrimination and exclusion of women in rebuilding families, communities and the nation has increased post the disaster. The human rights of women to safe and adequate shelter, livelihood and food have been violated; domestic violence has increased; women’s right to access lands has been denied; caste and ethnic discrimination and exclusion has increased; and armed conflict has endangered women’s lives further. The statement expresses concern about the lack of consultation with the affected people in the relief and reconstruction process, and recommends that there be: transparency about donor aid; recognition of the rights of women and children through legal and financial assistance; collection of gender disaggregated data; attention to specific issues concerning women; prevention of armed conflict in the regions; and recognition of rights to sea and coastal land.
Asia
Women,Tsunami,Thailand,Survival,Sri Lanka,Social Issues,Reproductive Labour,Rehabilitation,Reconstruction,Natural Disasters,Malaysia,Livelihood,Land,Indonesia,India,Human Rights,Gender,Food Security,Conflicts,Access Rights
4
No
110
ICSF. 2007. Gender Focus: Women in Fisheries: A Collection of Articles from Yemaya 2007, ICSF, India.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
This web dossier compiles selected articles from Yemaya, the gender and fisheries newsletter from ICSF initiated in 1999. These articles are organized by region—Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe, Pacific Islands and North America—and they provide a broad overview of the key issues women are facing in the fisheries sector in each region. Women of fishing communities across the world play vital roles in fisheries and in sustaining their households, communities, social networks and cultures, roles that often remain unacknowledged and undervalued. The most recurrent issue underlying the articles is the struggle for recognition of fisherwomen’s work. Other issues covered include access to essential livelihood and fishing resources; displacement due to developmental processes; labour issues such as poor conditions of work in fish processing plants; job insecurity and layoff; lack of social security coverage and gender-based disparity in wages; degradation of coastal, natural resources and impact on health. Finally, a significant number of articles are about women organizing and establishing solidarity networks to defend their own and community interests at national and regional levels.
World
Women,Wages,Unemployment,Technology,Socio-economic Aspects,Social Security,Organisations,Natural Resources,Livelihood,Labour,Impact,Health,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Resources,Fisheries Development,Fisheries,Fish Processing,Exclusion,Ecology,Displacement,Culture,Conditions of Work,Labor
5
No
111
ICSF. 1997. Public Hearing on the Struggles of Women Workers in the Fish Processing Industry in India. Women in Fisheries Dossier Series No. 1, ICSF, India. 50pp.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
This dossier puts together documents related to a unique public hearing held at Cochin, India in June 1995, on the problems faced by women workers in India's fish processing industry. The processing sector in fisheries is very labour intensive and utilises migrant female labour. These migrant girls and women, often unmarried, are very vulnerable, living in extremely poor working and housing conditions. Also, they do not get the benefits that they are entitled to by law. In 1993, this issue was investigated by the women’s wing of the National Fishworker’s Forum (NFF)—an independent union of artisanal fishworker organizations aided by ICSF’s women members in Kerala. This public hearing in which around 250 people from eight states of India took part, was organised to mobilise women fishprocessors and to bring to the forefront an issue. Apart from a comprehensive report on the sector, this Dossier includes transcripts of oral testimonies of some of the women workers and the judgement of the jury.
Asia
Women,NFF,Migrants,Living Conditions,Labour,Kerala,India,Housing,Fishworkers Organisation,Fishing Industry,Fisheries Legislation,Fish Processing,Employment Discrimination,Documentation,Conditions of Work,Artisanal Fisheries
4
No
112
Oamjie J. Fisher Women in Kerala Fight Back. Theeradesa Mahila Vedi (Women’s Wing of KSMTF), KSMTF, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala. 31p.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
Within India, Kerala, with a total terrestrial area of 38,000 sq km and a coastal line of 590 km, is a major exporter of fish and fish products. More than a million people from fishing communities live in 222 fishing villages in the State. This paper documents the activities and protests of Theeradesa Mahila Vedi, the women’s wing of Kerala Swathanthra Matsya Thozhilali Federation (fishworker’s union in the southern part of the state) since its inception. This organization has actively taken up issues that confront fisherwomen including labour discrimination between men and women, marginalization caused by changes in technology and competition in markets caused by globalization. The paper gives a historical narrative of the fisherwomen’s movement as it struggled with issues like denial of public and private rights; atrocities in the market created by local thugs, middlemen and moneylenders; constraints in mobility, health and family relations; anti-fishworker and anti-gender government policies, and violence and sexual harassment of fisherwomen and their girl children.
Asia
Women,Violence,Trawling,Technology,Social Issues,Social Action,Policy,Markets,Labour,Kerala,India,Human Rights,History,Health,Globalization,Gender,Fishworkers Organisation,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Trade,Exports,Employment Discrimination,Children,Globalisation
4
No
113
Burnad F. 2006. Tsunami Aftermath: Violations of Human Rights of Dalit Women, Tamil Nadu, India. APWLD, Thailand. 42p.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
This report presents the findings and the recommendations of the Survey of Dalit Women’s Human Rights Violations post the Indian Ocean tsunami in Tamil Nadu, India. The Survey was conducted in November, 2005, through interviews of 400 people and visits to temporary shelters and affected villages in five districts of Tamil Nadu State. The survey exposes the discrimination and exclusion of Dalit communities from the post-tsunami relief and reconstruction process by the government and non-government agencies, and documents ‘new’ forms of violence against women such as forced recanalization and tsunami marriages.
Asia
Women,Violence,Tsunami,Tamil Nadu,Shelters,Relief,Reconstruction,NGO,Natural Disasters,India,Human Rights
2
No
114
ICSF. 1997. Women First: Report of the Women in Fisheries Programme of the ICSF in India, Volume 1. Women in Fisheries Dossier Series No. 2, ICSF, India. 120p.
0
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
This Dossier is devoted to women in fisheries in India and is an acknowledgement of the role women have played in sustaining coastal communities and the effort they have taken to make their work and problems more visible. It comprises two parts. The first contains factual information on women’s involvement in fisheries in each of the nine maritime States of India, namely Gujarat, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal. The second part is a series of articles related to women in fisheries which give a more analytical understanding of the problems of women and their efforts to organize. Some of the issues covered include health and reproductive rights of women in fishing communities of Kerala, the campaign against shrimp industries, and gender awareness in fishworker organizations. Most of the material for this Dossier was gathered between 1993 and 1995 as part of ICSF’s International Women in Fisheries programme.
Asia
Women,West Bengal,Tamil Nadu,Social Issues,Shrimp,Seafood Industry,Policy,Maharashtra,Labour,Kerala,Karnataka,India,ICSF,Health,Gujarat,Goa,Gender,Fishworkers Organisation,Fishing Communities,Exclusion,Aquaculture,Andhra Pradesh
4
No
115
Neis B. 2000. In the Eye of the Storm–Research, Activism and Teaching within the Newfoudland Fishery Crisis. Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 278-298pp.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
This paper examines the 1990s fisheries crisis in Newfoundland and Labrador from the point of view of a feminist researcher, activist and teacher involved in that crisis. The formation and work of the Newfoundland and Labrador Women’s FishNet, a voluntary group of feminists of which the author was a founding member, provided her with the sisterhood and organizational and strategic resources she needed to move beyond this impasse. FishNet activities provide the focus for the second section of the paper. The author emphasizes the ways FishNet helped to empower its members and women from fishery communities but closes with a discussion of some of the factors that contributed to its collapse. In the final section, the author examines some of the lessons she has learned from her experience as a researcher, teacher and activist working on feminist fisheries issues within Newfoundland and Labrador during the fisheries crisis.
N. America
Women,Social Issues,Social Change,Social Action,Organisations,Newfoundland,Fishing Communities,Feminism,Canada
4
No
116
Quist C. 2004. The Changing Role of Women in Fishing Communities: An Experience from the Netherlands. Presented at the North Sea Conference, 22-23 June 2004, Peterhead, Scotland.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
The author strongly feels that the “invisibility” of women’s role in fisheries, particularly of the wives and daughters of fishermen, has resulted in the exclusion of fisherwomen’s issues. One consequence of this is the failure to seriously investigate social and management problems that women fishers face today. The author talks about the formation of VinVis, an autonomous and open network for women in Dutch fisheries, concerned about their future. She strongly advocates for the recognition and validation of women's roles in fisheries.
Europe
Women,Social Issues,Denmark
4
No
117
Ennis G and Woodrow H (eds). 1996. Strong as the Ocean: Women's Work in the Newfoundland and Labrador Fisheries. Harrish Press, New Foundland. 86p.
0
Struggles and Movements N/a
This book is about a special project of the Newfoundland and Labrador Women’s Fishnet, formed in 1994, to make visible the concerns of women in the fisheries sector to decision-makers and the public. Each story uniquely brings out experiences that every fisherwoman faces while fishing, in processing, in formation of unions, and in management and administration.
N. America
Projects,Policy,Organisations,Newfoundland,Gender,Fishworker Union,Fish Processing,Decision Making,Canada
3
No
118
Moisan L. 2001. Of Fish and Women: The Transition to Responsible Fisheries, Women's Interests and Role. Sisterhood is global institute (SIGI). 37p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
In the first part of this three-part paper, the author discusses the importance of fisheries as a source of employment, food and income, particularly in developing countries. In the second part, she describes the various competing interests in fisheries, and the challenges faced by the governments in balancing these interests. She looks at the institutional responses to fisheries issues since the 1970s, and the main instruments created for fisheries management and sustainable development at the regional and international levels. In part three she discusses the crucial roles women play in fisheries and fishing communities, their invisibility and the need to include them as actors and stakeholders in policy, management and operational decision-making. She stresses that the SIGI initiative will enhance women’s visibility in fisheries, broaden their understanding about the origins and causes of the global fisheries crisis, and enhance their credibility as informed stakeholders who can lead and politically influence decision-making fora.
World
Sustainable Development,Socio-economic Aspects,Policy,Organisations,Governance,Gender,Food Security,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Management,Exclusion,Employment,Developing Countries,Decision Making
3
No
119
Jentoft S. 1999. Why is Gender a Non-issue in Fisheries Management? Paper presented at Women's Worlds Conference, Tromso, June 24, 1999. 8p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
For current fisheries management systems and practices, women’s concerns, interests and contributions are typically considered unimportant. It is not simply a matter of neglect, but rather an issue of perceived irrelevance. This perception is shared by fisheries scientists in Norway and elsewhere. “Why are women’s issues, interests and knowledge disregarded when governments design fisheries management systems?" This is the question addressed in the paper.
Europe
Women,Social Issues,Governance,Gender,Fisheries Management
5
No
120
Williams M J et al. (Eds.) 1998. International Symposium on Women in Asian Fisheries. Fifth Asian Fisheries Forum 13 November 1998, Chiang Mai, Thailand. 181p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
This publication presents a record of the 1998 International Symposium on Women in Asian Fisheries. The fisheries sector has unique problems related to women, which have to be addressed not only from a technical standpoint but also from a social one. The symposium aimed at stimulating discussion and promoting well-planned research and development activities in this area. Thirteen presentations, resulting from scientific research and documented field experiences, describe regional experiences. Case studies from Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and the countries of Indo-China largely re-emphasize the various aspects of gender inequity resulting from social traditions, cultural orientation, and family and work place values, exacerbated by poverty and state indifference. The impact on women is well-documented: unrecognized and unvalued work at home, lack of or poor access to productive resources, lack of opportunities for self- or paid-employment, displacement by new technology or production arrangements, lower chances for advancement, low wages, exploitation by employers, poor health and poor productivity. Amongst other impacts on families, food insecurity remains a constant threat.
Asia
Women,Wages,Thailand,Technology,Taiwan,South East Asia,Social Issues,Poverty,Philippines,Malaysia,Labour,Informal Sector,India,Income,Impact,Health,Gender,Food Security,Employment Discrimination,Education,Economy,Displacement,Development,Culture,Bangladesh
4
No
121
ICSF. 2004. Gender Agenda Women in Fisheries: A Collection of Articles from SAMUDRA Report. ICSF, India. 100pp
http://www.icsf.net/images/dossiers/pdf/english/issue_58/58_all.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
Throughout the world, women of fishing communities play a central role in the fisheries and in maintaining the social fabric. However, they remain largely invisible, and their roles largely undocumented. Policy interventions meant to support them have been few and far between, contributing to their systematic marginalization within the fisheries sector. Where women have claimed spaces in organizations and processes, they have brought in a perspective that prioritizes improving the quality of life and fisheries-based livelihoods. For these women, life is the goal, not fishing, as this dossier of articles from India, Fiji, Peru, Bangladesh, Chile and Fogo Islands reveals.
World
Women,Social Development,Policy,Peru,Organisations,Livelihood,India,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Development,Fiji,Conditions of Life,Chile,Bangladesh
5
No
122
Slatter C. 1992. Women in Fisheries in the Pacific: Reappraising the Problem and Exploring Prospects for a Future NGO Initiative: A Discussion paper for the CUSO Meeting August 27-28 1992, Suva, Fiji.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
The findings and recommendations of research carried out on women’s fisheries development in Pacific island countries in the last decade have not resulted in greater support. The paper aims to analyze and find out the underlying constraints influencing national and regional policies on development strategies for women in fisheries.
Oceania
Women,Research and Development,Policy,Pacific Islands,Fisheries Development
3
No
123
International Conference on Women in Fisheries, Mumbai 11-12 December 2001. Indian Society of Fisheries Professionals. 23p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
This issue of Indian Society of Fisheries Professionals is a collection of six articles on women in fisheries presented at an international conference on the same subject, in Mumbai in December 2001.The articles include an overview on the contribution of women in Asian fisheries; the need for visibility for the fisherwomen in India; a note on the organizing of fisherwomen in Chellanam in Cochin; a perspective on gender in fisheries; the role of women and work activities, strategic interventions for increasing their participation and income; and finally an article looking to the future, outlining the change in women's status over time, as well as the institutional support that currently exists.
Asia
Women,Social Security,Labour,India,Income,Gender,Food Security,Fishworkers Organisation
3
No
124
Gender Study for Tuna Management and Development in Fiji Islands. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 10, April 2002, New Caledonia. 3-4pp.
0
https://www.spc.int/coastfish/news/WIF/WIF10/WIF_10-A4.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
This report on gender issues in Solomon Islands, Palau and Vanuatu in the tuna industry aimed to assist the Fiji Islands government in the preparation of a national tuna development and management plan and proposed strategies to address negative gender impacts. It was to ensure that the benefits of any new industrial initiatives are distributed as evenly as possible to all Fiji Islands citizens: men and women of different ages and cultures, living in different geographic areas. Although women make up only three per cent of the people employed in the harvesting sector of the commercial tuna industry, they make up at least 64 per cent of those employed in the processing sector. As a group, women often receive the least number of benefits and bear the brunt of the most adverse effects.
Oceania
Women,Vanuatu,Tuna,Solomon Is,Palau,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,Fish Harvesting,Fiji,Empowerment,Employment Discrimination,Employment
4
No
125
Suntornratana U and Visser T. 2003. Women as Source of Information on Inland Fisheries. New Approaches for the Improvement of Inland Capture Fishery Statistics in the Mekong River, Ad-hoc Expert Consultation. RAP Publication, Bangkok. 44-48pp.
0
http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/ad070e/ad070e07.htm
Recognition and Policy N/a
Women are rarely consulted when the state collects information on the fishing sector. This is despite the fact that women are significantly involved in inland fishing, particularly for subsistence, in addition to their work within the household—domestic labour. They have as much experience and local knowledge as the men, although of a different and complementary nature, since they are not involved in industrial fishing and fishing that extends over long periods. In some sectors (subsistence/family fishing, marketing/processing and nutrition/consumption) women often have more knowledge and information than men.
Asia
Women,Traditional Knowledge,Sustainable Fisheries,Nutrition,Labour,Inland Fisheries,Food Security,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Employment Discrimination,Consumers
3
No
126
Rana K and Choo P S. 2001. Women in Fisheries in the European Union. Presented at the Global Symposium on Women in Fisheries: Sixth Asian Fisheries Forum, 29th November, 2001, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. 197-201pp.
0
http://www.iclarm.net/Pubs/Wif/wifglobal/wifg_europe.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
Women in Europe have participated actively in the fishing sector since the 19th century. Statistics collected from the European Union showed that women participate actively in fish processing activities, followed by marine aquaculture, marine fishing and inland aquaculture. Even in the European Union, where women have greater basic human rights than their counterparts from developing countries, the former to a large extent still plays an invisible and subservient role and is largely excluded in fisheries management systems.
Europe
Women,Statistics,Marine Fisheries,Human Rights,Fisheries Management,Fish Processing,Europe,Developing Countries,Aquaculture
4
No
127
Aslin H J, Webb T and Fisher M. 2000. Fishing for Women: Understanding Women’s Roles in the Fishing Industry. Bureau of Rural Sciences, Canberra, Australia. 109pp.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
This study forms part of a larger research project initiated by the Women’s Industry Network (WIN), a South Australian-based non-government organization for women in the fishing industry, and the Social Sciences Centre of the Bureau of Rural Sciences (BRS). The research deals with women in the commercial fishing industry (sometimes termed the ‘seafood industry’), covering wild catch fisheries and aquaculture. Specifically, the research is based on the view that women’s roles in the Australian fishing industry are poorly reflected in industry statistics, and women’s contributions to industry output and productivity are poorly recognized.
Oceania
Women,Statistics,Seafood Industry,NGO,Labour Productivity,Informal Sector,Exclusion,Employment Discrimination,Commercial Fishing,Australia,Aquaculture
3
No
128
Matthews E. 1995. The Need for Invertebrate Conservation in the Pacific Islands Region. Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 123-136pp.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
In Pacific islands men are increasingly being drawn into commercial fishing activities while women collect invertebrates, an activity not seriously taken into consideration by many fisheries department, and thus women are isolated from mainstream fisheries programmes. The authors call for a new management strategy that would pay greater attention to women.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Pacific Islands,Labour,Informal Sector,Employment Discrimination,Labor
2
No
129
Ram-Bidesi V. 1995. Changes to Women’s Roles in Fisheries Development in Fiji. Fishing for Answers: Women and Fisheries in the Pacific Islands, edited by Elizabeth Matthews for the Women and Fisheries Network, Oceania Printers Ltd, Suva, Fiji. 71-90pp.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
Case-study of women involved in fisheries in Fiji, who are active productive agents and have an important role in the sustainability of the resources. The author encourages the implementation of the UN World Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) guidelines that call for strategies to enhance women’s fishing activities by incorporating them into mainstream fisheries development.
Oceania
Development,Fiji,Fisheries,Gender,Organisations,Sustainable Fisheries,UNCED,Women
2
No
130
Gammage S. 1996. El Salvador: Women in Fisheries. The Tattered Net of Statistics. SAMUDRA Report Issue 16, November 1996, India. 13-17pp
http://www.icsf.net/images/samudra/pdf/english/issue_16/2997_art04.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
A discussion is presented on the important role played by women in the fisheries of El Salvador. Official statistics for El Salvador reveal that very few women fish, approximately 6 per cent; however, observing the daily activities of fishers and the pattern of household involvement in fish production and processing in the country indicates this figure to be very different. Quantitative surveys conducted often fail to capture the gender diversity of the fishing economy. Reference is made to a survey conducted of mangrove households in 1993/94 in El Tamarindo to document the nature and extent of the relationship men and women had with the resource base.
Oceania
Women,Statistics,Mangroves,Gender,Fisheries Resources,Fisheries Economy,Fish Processing,Exclusion,El Salvador
4
No
131
Nandeesha M C. 1996. La Mujer en la Pesca de Los Países de Indochina - Les Femmes S’impliquent à la Pêche dans les Pays Indo-Chinois. INFOFISH International, Issue 6. 15-21pp.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
Women play an important role in fisheries in the Indo-Chinese peninsula, but their contributions have not been adequately recognized. PADEK, recognizing the most important role of women in fisheries, organized a national workshop in Cambodia in 1994, and a regional Seminar on Women in Fisheries in 1996. The objectives of the seminar were to assess the situation of women in various sectors of fisheries in the region, identify the problems encountered and develop programmes to overcome the problems experienced by them.
Asia
Women,South East Asia,Social Action,Organisations,Labour,Gender,Fisheries,Development
3
No
132
Sultan S. 1991. Role of Women in Fisheries. Fishing Chimes, Vol. 11, Issue 4. 43p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
A brief examination is made of the role played by women in fisheries in rural environments in India. Areas in which women may be encouraged to participate include: capture fisheries; transportation, processing and marketing; nets and gears; and, ornamental fisheries. It is concluded that there is a need for a plan for the induction of women in the fisheries sector under various appropriate schemes
Asia
Women,Transportation,Rural Development,PHF,Participatory Management,Ornamental Fish,Labour,India,Gender,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Employment,Capture Fisheries,Asia,Labor
2
No
133
Report on the Women in Fisheries (WIF) Conference in Mindanao January 27-29 2004, Bonbon, Cagayan de Oro City.
0
Recognition and Policy,Women and Resources Management N/a
This is a report on a three-day workshop where women leader representatives from Visayas and Mindanao met to develop a deeper understanding of women in fisheries so that women can become central to coastal zone management, and can enhance their active participation in implementing the Fisheries Code, and particularly in the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Councils [FARMC]. A unique feature of the workshop was its participative and process-oriented methodology wherein women moved on a reflective journey beginning from an untainted paradise of the bygone days to the prevailing realities, to arrive upon root causes of current issues.
Asia
Women,Reproductive Labour,Philippines,Labour,History,Gender,Coastal Zones,Coastal Management
3
No
134
Tanyang G. 2003. Fisheries and Gender: A Synthesis of Issues and Emerging Perspectives. Tambuyog Development Center, Quezon City. 23p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
This paper analyzes the existing understanding of the fishery industry in Philippines. It reviews women’s issues, involvement of women in commercial fishing, aquaculture, household production, food security, health services and education. It provides a comparative picture of the human development index, maternal mortality rate, infant mortality rate, and functional literacy rates in the selected regions of Philippines.
Asia
Women,Social Issues,Philippines,Mortality,Human Development,Health,Gender,Food Security,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Education,Death,Commercial Fishing,Children,Aquaculture
4
No
135
Siason I M et al. 2001. Women in Fisheries in Asia. Global Symposium on Women in Fisheries. Sixth Asian fisheries Forum, 29th November 2001, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. 1-30pp.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
This paper begins with a review of the cultural and political background of selected Asian countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, Kuwait, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, the Lao PDR, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam). The focus of the paper is on the importance of the fisheries industry in these economies and the involvement of women in the fisheries industry. Women in most of these countries do not enjoy the basic human rights that their male counterparts enjoy. Issues pertaining to gender inequality in the fisheries sector, and solutions to overcome some of these issues are also discussed.
World
Women,Vietnam,Thailand,Sri Lanka,Saudi Arabia,Politics,Philippines,Nepal,Malaysia,Laos,Kuwait,Japan,Iran,Indonesia,Human Rights,Employment Discrimination,Economy,Culture,Cambodia,Bangladesh,Asia
4
No
136
Kaplan I M. 1999. Suspicion, Growth and Co-management in the Commercial Fishing Industry: The Financial Settlers of New Bedford. Marine Policy, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 227-241pp.
0
Recognition and Policy,Status of Women N/a
Origins and organization of New Bedford financial settlement houses are examined. Settlement houses are an important part of the extensive fishing community and have made significant historic contributions. Most contemporary and many of the earliest settlers are female and women’s contributions to the fishing industry are discussed. Emphasis is also placed on the fisher-based solution that settlement houses represent; implications for use in co-management strategies and the need to reduce the adversarial atmosphere in fisheries governance are discussed.
N. America
Women,Housing,History,Governance,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Management,Co-management
2
No
137
Williams S B, Hochet-Kibongui A-M and Nauen C E. 2005. Gender, Fisheries, and Aquaculture: Social Capital and Knowledge for the Transition Towards Sustainable Use of Aquatic Ecosystems. ACP-EU Fisheries Research Report Number 16, Brussels. 32p.
0
Role of Women in Aquaculture,Women and Resources Management N/a
Fishing communities are faced with massive aquatic ecosystem degradation caused largely by unsustainable fishing, and associated socio-economic challenges. In this context, aquaculture has given mixed signals with high economic growth rates but some unsustainable consequences. This raises the question about women's contribution in fisheries and aquaculture towards sustainability and restoration of lost productivity. Empirical evidence of women’s roles in all continents shows patterns of unrecognized, unpaid labour that clouds the economic signals of increasing resource rarefaction. Historically, women have been associated with resource conservation embedded in traditional belief systems, which have been progressively eroded. Where social recognition is achieved through e.g. enforcement of modern equal opportunity legislation—especially when combined with access to formal education and training—women regain capabilities for enhanced social organization and leadership. This can lead to significant contributions to restoration of natural resources. The paper proposes a participatory method to render women's role visible and enable development of socio-economic organization supportive of social justice and sustainable resource use. The case studies are from Canary Islands in Spain, Brittany region of France, Southern Nigeria, Amazonian and South Eastern Brazil, Mexico, Newfoundland and Labrador, Pacific Islands, coastal Asia and the Mekong Region.
World
Women,Training,Traditional Fisheries,Sustainable Use,Spain,Socio-economic Aspects,Resources Management,Pacific Islands,Overcapacity,Organisations,Nigeria,Newfoundland,Mexico,Mekong Delta,Marine Fisheries,Labour,History,France,Fishing Communities,Empowerment,Education,Economy,Conservation,Canada,Brazil,Asia,Aquaculture,Amazon
4
No
138
Dias J C and Joseph C. 1992. Women in Fisheries: An Indian Perspective. The Fisherfolk of Asia: Justice Denied - Report and Statement of the Fifth Asian Fisherfolk Consultation, January 26-31 1992. Asian Cultural Forum on Development, Songkla, Thailand. 140-149pp.
0
Development Initiatives N/a
This document expands on the role of women in India where their potential has often been overlooked and analyses the Bay of Bengal Project (BOBP) experience and the positive results it obtained. It calls for a greater involvement of NGOs to stimulate and catalyze women’ s activities.
Asia
Women,Reproductive Labour,NGO,India,Development,BOBP
3
No
139
Power N G. 2005. What Do They Call a Fisherman?: Men, Gender, and Restructuring in the Newfoundland Fishery. St. John's, ISER Press.
0
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
The author examines through a feminist lens how the tension between two views—a way of life and a way to make a living—is played out and how these changes affect men (and women) in the Bonavista and Trinity Bays inshore fishery. Has a 'crisis of fish' and the loss or diminution of livelihood led to a 'crisis of masculinity'? Through extensive interviews with fishers and fish-plant workers, the author discovers that men respond to restructuring in complex ways mediated, enabled, and constrained by their class and gender positions and by maritime cultural values.
N. America
Women,Value,Livelihood,Inshore Fisheries,Gender,Feminism,Culture
3
No
140
SPC Publication. Setting up a small-scale Business: A guide for women in Fisheries, in SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 3, December 1998, New Caledonia. 28p.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/news/WIF/WIF3.pdf
Development Initiatives N/a
Primarily written for women who are interested in setting up small-scale fisheries businesses, this manual covers topics ranging from undertaking free feasibility research, producing business plans as well as setting up monitoring and evaluation systems for the businesses. Written as a training manual, the booklet can be used in a workshop setting. It also includes group exercises and appendices for overhead transparencies and handouts.
Oceania
Women,Training,Small Scale Fisheries,Research and Development,Monitoring
3
No
141
Skeleton P and South G R. 1998. Women, Marine Awareness and Marine Conservation in Samoa: Technical report, in SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 3, December 1998, New Caledonia. 27p.
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/news/WIF/WIF3.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Development Initiatives N/a
This technical report examines the current involvement of women in marine awareness and conservation issues in Samoa. It defines the importance of the role of women in sustainable development strategies and look at options for strengthening this role.
Oceania
Women,Sustainable Development,Samoa,Reproductive Labour,Marine Resources,Gender,Empowerment,Conservation
4
No
142
Satia B P and Wétohossou C Z (eds). 1996. Report of the Working Group on Women's Key Role and Issues Related to Gender in Fishing Communities. Programme for the Integrated Development of Artisanal Fisheries in West Africa (IDAF) Cotonou, Benin, 34p.
0
http://www.fao.org/docrep/x0229e/x0229e00.htm#TopOfPage
Role of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
Women involved in artisanal fishing are considered as key actors in the socio-economic development of West African countries. Yet, the importance of their contribution is not well known. Thus, in 1995, IDAF Programme set up a Working Group to look at their role and issues related to gender in fishing communities. This group, composed of eleven women, all distinguished scientists and rural development experts in the sub-region, undertook ten case studies in fourteen (14) regions in eight countries in West Africa: M'Bour and Joal in Senegal, Kaback and Kamsar in Guinea, Koko in the Delta State in Nigeria, Limbe and Kribi in Cameroon, Brufut and Gunjur in the Gambia, Grand-Lahou and Adiake in Côte d'Ivoire, Aguégués and Ayiguinnou in Benin and finally Elmina in Ghana. The main activity of women is the processing and marketing of fishery products. Their expenses were on, first, food [50 per cent], then childcare and finally savings. There were some common problems that all the women faced: lack of credit, absence of storage infrastructure, dependence on men for fish supply, hygiene and sometimes health problems caused by smoking, and lack of training in accountancy and management. Some recommendations that the working group made were: strengthening women’s organizations in Ghana, the Gambia and Côte d'Ivoire, evaluating production costs and the incomes generated by women's activities in the fishing communities of Nigeria, Benin and Guinea, and assessing the nutrition, hygiene, and health aspects of women and children in the fishing communities of Cameroon and Senegal.
Africa
Women,Training,Storage,Socio-economic Aspects,Senegal,Reproductive Labour,Organisations,Nigeria,Labour,Informal Sector,Hygiene,Health,Guinea,Ghana,Gender,Gambia,Food Security,Fishing Communities,Fish Products,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing,Development,Credit,Cote d' Ivoire,Children,Cameroon,Benin,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
143
Chuenpagdee R, Liguori L, Palomares M L D and Pauly D. 2006. Bottom-up, Global Estimates of Small-Scale Marine Fisheries Catches. Fisheries Centre Research Reports Volume 14, No. 8. Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Canada. 105pp.
0
http://www.fisheries.ubc.ca/publications/reports/14_8.pdf
Role of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
This report points out that the socio-economic and cultural importance of small-scale fisheries is rarely recognized in national fisheries development policies, which tend to emphasize large-scale, industrial fisheries. Drawing from various sources it provides national–level estimates of small-scale fisheries (SSF) production, contribution of small-scale fisheries and related statistics for each maritime country, and then aggregates them at the global level. It also provides data on national definitions of small-scale fisheries, gears used, catch composition, number of fishers, number of boats and involvement of women and children. Significantly, in recognition of the important roles that women and children play in SSF, the report includes a discussion about gender issues.
World
Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Small Scale Fisheries,Reproductive Labour,Policy,Labour,Gender,Fishing Gear,Fishing Communities,Fishing Boats,Culture,Children,Catch
4
No
144
“What Role for Women in the Fisheries Sector?” Report. European Commission, 23-24 January 2003, Brussels. 10p.
0
http://ec.europa.eu/fisheries/press_corner/autres/rapport_en_230103.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
The European Commission organized a conference on the role of women in the fisheries sector in Brussels on 23 and 24 January 2003 attended by approximately 200 women from all Member States of the European Union. The conference aimed to give women involved in the industry an opportunity to learn about the experience of women who are their peers, to stimulate the creation of women's networks and to inform them about the financial support available under various EU programmes. The report is a summary of the main points raised during the conference.
Women,Labour,Gender,Fishing Industry,Finance,EU,Empowerment
4
No
145
Gender and Fisheries in APEC. 2004. Fisheries Working Group, Puerto Varas, Chile 6-7 May 2004. 16p.
0
Recognition and Policy N/a
This presentation gives information on APEC's commitment to engender fisheries, the conceptual frameworks the organisation uses for analysing gender, its efforts to internalise gender awareness and the resources it uses for working with gender mainstreaming.
World
Reproductive Labour,Organisations,Gender,Fishing Industry,Exclusion,APEC
3
No
146
Felsing M, Brugere C, Kusakabe K and Kelkar G. 2001. Women in Aquaculture. Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation, Project FWG 03/99. 60pp
0
http://www.dfid.stir.ac.uk/dfid/gender/winaqua.pdf
Role of Women in Aquaculture N/a
World
Aquaculture
1
No
147
Kittitornkool J. 1996. Women in Southern Thailand Small-scale Fishing Villages: Amidst Surging Waves. Workshop on Gender Relations in Fisheries. Senegal, June 10 -18, 1996. 23p.
0
Women and Resources Management,Role of Women N/a
Women in southern small-scale fishing villages in Thailand take care of the family, do all the household chores and also go fishing with men. This is particularly true in fishing villages where community organizations have worked to solve issues related to coastal resource degradation. Women in these villages play a significant role in initiating, mobilizing and implementing a variety of activities. Yet these roles played by women are not recognized in Thai society. This paper presents primary information on these roles.
Asia
Women,Thailand,Sustainable Fisheries,Small Scale Fisheries,Labour,Informal Sector,Income,Gender,Fishing Village,Ecology,Community Organisations,Coastal Resources,Labor
2
No
148
V Schaik Iiona. 2006. Women in a Weedy Business: A Study on the Socio-economic Effects of a Marine Biosphere Reserve on the Livelihoods of Women and their Households in a Tamil Nadu Fishing Village. MA Thesis Human Geography, Institute of Human Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam.
0
Status of Women N/a
This thesis presents the results of a study of the consequences of a Marine Biosphere Reserve in the Gulf of Mannar on the livelihoods of women and their households in the fishing village Chinnapalam. During a three-month period of fieldwork in Tamil Nadu's coastal district Ramanathapuram (Ramnad), the research focussed on the characteristics of women in a fishing village, the activities of women and their households, their interaction with the natural environment, the livelihood strategies they obtain, their attitude towards conservation and the effects of the Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve (GOMMBRE) on these. The study reveals that the traditional and historical activities of the population of Chinnapalam are threatened since the declaration of the GOMMBRE in 1989.
Asia
Women,Tamil Nadu,Socio-economic Aspects,Seaweed,India,Fishing Village
3
No
149
Rajagopalan R. 2007. Restricting Lives and Livelihoods. Yemaya: Gender and Fisheries Newsletter Issue No. 26, November 2007. 2-3pp.
newsletters
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_26/1316_art01.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
The recent enforcement of ‘no take’ regulations in the Gulf of Mannar National Park compromises the livelihood security of fisherwomen and local communities
Asia
Women,Sustainable Use,Stakeholders,Social Issues,Small Scale Fisheries,Resources Management,Protected Areas,Organizations,Organisations,No-take Zones,National Parks,MPA,Marine Resources Conservation,Marine Resources,Marine Reserves,Marine Parks,Local Communities,India,Gender,Fishworkers Organization,Fishworkers Organisation,Fishworkers,Fishing Zones,Fishing Rights,Fishing Regulations,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Resources,Displacement,Conservation,Conflicts,Community Organizations,Community Organisations,Coastal Villages,Coastal Resources,Coastal Fisheries,Coastal Environment,Biosphere Reserve,Artisanal Fisheries,Access Rights
4
No
150
Aswani S and Weiant P. 2003. Shellfish Monitoring and Women’s Participatory Management in Roviana, Solomon Islands. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 12, May 2003. 3-11pp
0
http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/WIF/WIF12/WIF12.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
In 1999, the women of Baraulu and Bulelavata villages in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands, created a community-based marine protected area to sustain marine resources valuable for nutrition and income-generation. This has resulted in sustaining invertebrate biological resources and in promoting strong community support. The paper outlines the details of the project, its biological results, the processes involved ensuring community participation and lessons learnt. A high level of community involvement is achieved when positive scientific results generated by the monitoring protocol, are returned to the community. This educational process cross-fertilized indigenous and Western knowledge and increased women’s interest in the project and their direct participation in monitoring and enforcement. The project’s success has encouraged several nearby villages to launch conservation initiatives.
Oceania
Income,Marine Resources,Sustainable Fisheries,Community Based Management,MPA,Women,Solomon Is,Traditional Knowledge,Resources Management,Nutrition,Monitoring,Food Security,Empowerment,Ecology,Conservation
4
No
151
WilliamsS B, Hochet-Kibongui A-M and Nauen C E. 2005. Gender, Fisheries, and Aquaculture: Social Capital and Knowledge for the Transition Towards Sustainable Use of Aquatic Ecosystems. ACP-EU Fisheries Research Report Number 16, Brussels. 32p.
0
Women and Resources Management N/a
Fishing communities are faced with massive aquatic ecosystem degradation caused largely by unsustainable fishing, and associated socio-economic challenges. In this context, aquaculture has given mixed signals with high economic growth rates but some unsustainable consequences. This raises the question about women's contribution in fisheries and aquaculture towards sustainability and restoration of lost productivity. Empirical evidence of women’s roles in all continents shows patterns of unrecognized, unpaid labour that clouds the economic signals of increasing resource rarefaction. Historically, women have been associated with resource conservation embedded in traditional belief systems, which have been progressively eroded. Where social recognition is achieved through e.g. enforcement of modern equal opportunity legislation—especially when combined with access to formal education and training—women regain capabilities for enhanced social organization and leadership. This can lead to significant contributions to restoration of natural resources. The paper proposes a participatory method to render women's role visible and enable development of socio-economic organization supportive of social justice and sustainable resource use. The case studies are from Canary Islands in Spain, Brittany region of France, Southern Nigeria, Amazonian and South Eastern Brazil, Mexico, Newfoundland and Labrador, Pacific Islands, coastal Asia and the Mekong Region.
World
Spain,Socio-economic Aspects,Role,Resources Management,Pacific Islands,Overcapacity,Organizations,Organisations,Nigeria,Newfoundland,Mexico,Mekong Delta,Marine Fisheries,Labour,Labor,History,France,Fishing Communities,Empowerment,Education,Economy,Conservation,Canada,Brazil,Asia,Aquaculture,Amazon,Women,Training,Traditional Fisheries,Sustainable Use
4
No
152
Skeleton P and South G R. 1998. Women, Marine Awareness and Marine Conservation in Samoa: Technical report, in SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 3, December 1998. 27p
0
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/News/WIF/WiF2.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
This technical report examines the current involvement of women in marine awareness and conservation issues in Samoa. It defines the importance of the role of women in sustainable development strategies and look at options for strengthening this role.
Oceania
Women,Sustainable Development,Samoa,Reproductive Labour,Reproductive Labor,Marine Resources,Gender,Empowerment,Conservation
4
No
153
Kibria MdG, Edwards P, Kelkar G and Demaine H. 1999. Women in Pond Aquaculture in the Oxbow Lakes of Bangladesh. Aquaculture Asia, Vol. 4, Issue 4. 7-14pp.
0
Women and Resources Management N/a
Fish and fisheries play an integral part of the culture and tradition in the life of the people of Bangladesh. The country has some 600 oxbow lakes created from dead river-bends scattered over the southwestern region of the country. The introduction of community management in 23 of the common property oxbow lakes has involved active participation of women. Women are successfully included in the management of oxbow lake fisheries under the Oxbow Lake Small-Scale Fishermen Project II. An assessment is made of the technological and socio-economic effects of Fish Farming Group pond aquaculture, with emphasis on the involvement of women. Some recommendations are made based on social, technological and gender aspects for the future sustainability of Fish Farming Groups.
Asia
Women,Technology,Socio-economic Aspects,Reproductive Labour,Reproductive Labor,Pond Fish Culture,Participatory Management,Lakes,Gender,Community Management,Bangladesh,Aquaculture
3
No
154
Report on the Women in Fisheries (WIF) Conference in Mindanao January 27-29 2004, Bonbon, Cagayan de Oro City.
0
Women and Resources Management N/a
This is a report on a three-day workshop where women leader representatives from Visayas and Mindanao met to develop a deeper understanding of women in fisheries so that women can become central to coastal zone management, and can enhance their active participation in implementing the Fisheries Code, and particularly in the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Councils [FARMC]. A unique feature of the workshop was its participative and process-oriented methodology wherein women moved on a reflective journey beginning from an untainted paradise of the bygone days to the prevailing realities, to arrive upon root causes of current issues.
Asia
Women,Reproductive Labour,Reproductive Labor,Philippines,Labour,Labor,History,Gender,Coastal Zones,Coastal Management
3
No
155
Shon T. 1998. Role of Women in Samoan Society: The Sacred Convenant. Extracted from: ‘Women and Rural Fisheries Development: A Case Study of Auala-Savaii’. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin, Issue 2, March 1998. 7-12pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/News/WIF/WiF2.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
This research discusses the role of women in traditional Samoan society. It also outlines a prawn project in Auala, a Samoan village, as a case study that demonstrates the value of women’s labour in sustaining Samoa’s marine environment as well as in contributing to the local economy and well-being. Finally, it draws attention to the complete exclusion of women in Samoa from the decision-making processes in the rural Fisheries Management Plan, and to the necessity of integrating their roles on the ground with the Plan.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Samoa,Role,Reproductive Labour,Reproductive Labor,Policy,Marine Environment,Labour,Labor,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Management,Employment Discrimination,Economy,Ecology,Decision Making,Aquaculture
2
No
156
Kinch J. 2003. Marine Mollusc Use Among the Women of Brooker Island, Louisiade Archipelago, Papua New Guinea. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 13, December 2003, New Caledonia. 5-14pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/News/WIF/WIF13/WIF13.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
Brooker Islanders use approximately 5000 sq km of sea territory—an extensive and diverse marine environment. Their livelihoods, identity and culture is dependent on this environment. This paper outlines the ecological relationship and understanding that Brooker women have about marine life, particularly molluscs.
Oceania
Women,Traditional Fisheries,Territorial Sea,Role,Marine Environment,Livelihood,Islands,Gender,Fishing Communities,Exclusion,Ecology,Culture
2
No
157
Vunisea A. 1997. Women’s Fishing Participation in Fiji (with emphasis on women’s fisheries knowledge and skills). SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 1, October 1997, New Caledonia. 10-13pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/News/WIF/WiF1.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
As in other Pacific Islands, women in Verata dominate in the subsistence fishing sector, with increasing involvement in the local commercial fishery. In addition to significant contributions to the nutrition requirements of their homes, women fishers actively participate in the market economy with the commercialization of previously subsistence target species. Women face two disadvantages. In the traditional context, they were predominantly disadvantaged by conventional restrictions or taboos with their subsistence fishing activities invisibilized under household work, and in the changing economical condition, where fishing is shifting from subsistence to serving markets, women’s labour has increased without a corresponding increase in acknowledgement and status. Official documentation, for instance, still does not account for their participation in markets and overlooks it. Further, their traditional sustainable fishing practices that acted as a safeguard against misuse or over-exploitation of resources, are now being bypassed. The article documents the traditional practices that women employ and concludes by stating the need to understand and promote fishing methods that women use; include them in decision-making processes; and support the increase of their capacities.
Oceania
Women,Target Species,Subsistence Fisheries,Pacific Islands,Overcapacity,Nutrition,Markets,Labour,Labor,Food Security,Fishing Methods,Employment Discrimination,Economy,Documentation,Decision Making,Commercial Fishing
4
No
158
Brown J. 2007. Fishing for Tourists: Women Play Leadership Roles in Lagoon Management. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 16, March 2007, New Caledonia. 27pp.
0
http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/news/WIF/WIF16/WIF16_27_Brown.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
This article gives a brief account of Cooks Island fisheries. The small-scale sector has limited opportunities for participation by both men and women, though the sector is dominated by men. Women have now begun to take a more prominent role in protecting coastal fisheries.
Oceania
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Resources Management,Ecology,Cooks Is,Conservation,Coastal Fisheries
3
No
159
Kittitornkool J. 1996. Women in Southern Thailand Small-scale Fishing Villages: Amidst Surging Waves. Workshop on Gender Relations in Fisheries. Senegal, June 10 -18, 1996. 23p.
0
Women and Resources Management N/a
Women in southern small-scale fishing villages in Thailand take care of the family, do all the household chores and also go fishing with men. This is particularly true in fishing villages where community organizations have worked to solve issues related to coastal resource degradation. Women in these villages play a significant role in initiating, mobilizing and implementing a variety of activities. Yet these roles played by women are not recognized in Thai society. This paper presents primary information on these roles.
Asia
Coastal Resources,Community Organisations,Community Organizations,Ecology,Fishing Village,Gender,Income,Informal Sector,Labor,Labour,Small Scale Fisheries,Sustainable Fisheries,Thailand,Women
2
No
160
Bennett E. 2005. Gender, fisheries and development. Marine Policy, Vol. 29, Issue 5. 451-459pp
documents
Recognition and Policy N/a
Although West African fisheries have been the subject of considerable study, little attention has paid to the role of gender in the development process and, more specifically, the work done by women in the overall management of fisheries. Lack of attention to the gender dimension of fisheries management can result in policy interventions missing their target of creating sustainable livelihoods at the community level. There is little doubt that fishing-dependent communities have a vital role to play in the overall development process of many coastal West African States, but without a complete understanding of the complexity of gender roles, the goal of sustainable livelihoods is unlikely to be achieved. In a bid to improve knowledge about gender roles in fishing communities, and to provide policy makers with some guidance as to where interventions might be most useful, a workshop was held in Cotonou, Benin (West Africa) in December 2003. This paper provides a brief introduction to the theory on gender and fisheries development and then goes on to report the findings of the workshop. The most significant conclusion is that policy interventions which help strengthen institutional capacity in coastal artisanal communities would have the greatest over all impact. A move toward collecting gender and fisheries disaggregated data would also help expand existing knowledge about what are often marginal and isolated economic sectors.
Africa
Women,Livelihood,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Policy,Fisheries Management,Document,Artisanal Fisheries,Africa
4
No
161
Nayak N. 2007. Understanding the Impact of Fisheries Development on Gender Relations in Fisheries: The Importance of Reorienting the Focus of Fisheries Management Strategies Towards a More Life Centered and Gender Just Perspective. Protsahan, India. 22 p.
0
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
This paper, drawing on a larger study undertaken by the author, attempts to explore the impact of fisheries development on gender relations in fisheries. It is presented in a manner which could help both researchers and field workers see how data linkages can be made in order to go deeper into a feminist analysis of fisheries. It highlights the importance of fisheries management strategies that are oriented towards life and livelihoods, and that are gender-just. Discussion and comments are welcomed by the author for further collective thinking towards sustaining of coastal livelihoods.
Asia
Women,Tamil Nadu,Sustainable Fisheries,Rural Development,Reproductive Labour,Reproductive Labor,Patriarchy,Livelihood,Land,Infrastructure,India,Impact,Hygiene,Health,Gujarat,Gender,Fisheries Management,Education,Database,Coastal Fisheries,Coastal Communities,Co-management
4
No
162
Nikita G, Geethalakshmi V, Unnithan G R, Murthy L N and Jeyanthi P. 2007. Women in the Seafood Processing Sector in the Post Globalization Scenario - An Analysis. Paper presented at 2nd Global Symposium on Gender and Fisheries held during the 8th Asian Fisheries Forum, 21 November 2007, Kochi
documents
Globalization N/a
Women have always dominated the floor level in the seafood processing industry in India. With increasing consumer awareness on the quality of food, the demands of the importing countries for safe and good quality products also increased and this has led to considerable improvement in the overall working environment, especially in the EU approved processing units. However the trend of casualization of the workforce remains and more and more women workers come in the ‘contract’ or ‘temporary’ category. This deprives the women form many social security benefits and no job security. Despite advancement in the industry as a whole, women continue to remain in low end jobs, have only limited role in decision making process and have very little scope for career advancement. This paper presents the status of women in the sector as well as discusses issues like casualization and migrating.
Asia
Working Conditions,Women,Social Security,Seafood Processing,Seafood,Migrants,India,Gujarat
4
No
163
Maneschy M C. 1999. Growing recognition. Yemaya, Issue 2, November 1999
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_2/16_art02.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Status of Women N/a
At a meeting, "Fishermen and Fisherwomen Looking for Citizenship in the New Times" held from 24 to 26 Septermber 1999, in the province of Para, Brazil, the author observes the growing recognition of women within the fisheries and within the fishworker movement.
Latin America
Women,Livelihood,Latin America,Income,Gender,Empowerment,Brazil,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
164
Sharma C. 1999. Count us in too. Yemaya, Issue 2, November 1999
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_2/17_art03.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Status of Women N/a
This article stems from a meeting with Lourdinha Rodrigues, secretary of the colônia of Ponte de Pedras Goianahas, Brazil, who has worked to give women fishworkers a new self-identity.
Latin America
Women,Social Security,Reproductive Labour,Livelihood,Latin America,Fishing Communities,Empowerment,Employment,Education,East Africa,Brazil,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
165
Andrade E D. 2000. Uniting for health and safety. Yemaya, Issue 3, March 2000
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_3/34_art07.pdf
Role of Women,Globalization N/a
In this article, the author stresses on how unions in fish processing plants in Chile need to take up issues of health and safety as a priority.
Latin America
Women,Training,South America,Safety at Work,Reproductive Labour,Processing Units,Markets,Health,Gender,Fish Processing,Exports,Conditions of Life,Chile
3
No
166
Indu M G. 2000. Proud to be a fishworker. Yemaya, Issue 4, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_4/39_art01.pdf
Struggles and Movements N/a
Excerpts from an interview with Joana Rodrigues Mousinho, President of the fishermen’s colonia of Itapissuma in Pernambuco, Brazil.
Women,Tourism,Reproductive Labour,Mangroves,Livelihood,Licence,Latin America,Income,Gender,Fishworkers,Fishing Methods,Environmental Pollution,Employment,DFT,Brazil,Aquaculture
3
No
167
Sharma C. 2000. Gender Focus. Yemaya, Issue 4, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_4/40_art02.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
This article is on a workshop held in Brazil in June 2000, where participants discussed the need to valorize the work of women within the fisheries sector.
Latin America
Peru,NGO,MONAPE,Mexico,Latin America,Gender,Fishworkers Organization,Fishing Communities,CONAPACH,Coastal Fisheries,Chile,Brazil,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
168
Vidal L. 2001. Migrating to survive. Yemaya, Issue 6, April 2001.
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_6/77_art09.pdf
Globalization N/a
Women crabmeat processors from the Mexican state of Tabasco opt to migrate to the US despite the difficulties they face. This article is excerpted from a case study prepared by Laura Vidal, Co-ordinator of the St. Thomas Ecological Association of Women, Mexico, for the ‘Workshop on Gender and Coastal Fishing Communities in Latin America’ organized in June 2000 in Brazil.
Latin America
USA,Processing Units,Migration,Mexico,Living Conditions,Latin America,Labour,Income,Health,Conditions of Work
3
No
169
Maneschy M C. 2001. Who is a fishworker? Yemaya, Issue 6, April 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_6/74_art04.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
A discussion group on gender and fisheries at a seminar in Brazil from 17 to 19 November 2000, debated the situation of women of fishing communities.
Latin America
Women,Reproductive Labour,Latin America,Income,Gender,Fishworkers,Fishing Communities,Employment,Brazil
1
No
170
Alvarez J A. 2001. Women Weaving Networks. Yemaya, Issue 7, August 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_7/83_art05.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
This article is on a meeting held in Chile from 27 to 29 June 2001, where women fishworkers came together to discuss issues of common concern.
Latin America
Women,Visibility,South America,Gender,CONAPACH,Chile,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
171
Maneschy M C. 2001. Shared concerns. Yemaya, Issue 8, December 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_8/89_art05.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
This article contains notes from a trip to Chile in October 2001.
Latin America
Women,Sustainable Fisheries,South America,Small Scale Fisheries,Livelihood,Health,Fishworkers Organization,Employment,Education,CONAPACH,Chile
3
No
172
Mariana F. 2004. My life is the sea. Yemaya, Issue 16, August 2004.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_16/546_art02.pdf
Status of Women N/a
This brief profile of a fisherwoman from Chile is taken from the book ‘Mujeres de la Pesca Artesanal, relatos e imágenes de mujeres de la V región’ (Women and artisanal fishing: stories and pictures of women from Region V).
Women,South America,Safety at Sea,Occupational Hazards,Licence,Employment,Discrimination,Chile,Artisanal Fisheries,Alternative Employment
3
No
173
Cruz-Torres M L. 2004. Street of the Shrimp Ladies. Yemaya, Issue 17, December 2004.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_17/570_art01.pdf
Struggles and Movements N/a
Women shrimp traders in northwestern Mexico are an integral part of the local culture and make valuable contributions to the fishing sector and the local economy. However, they are nearly invisible to the local fishing authorities and the government. This article details how these women shrimp traders have organized to defend their interests, although problems persist.
Women,Vendors,Shrimp,Reproductive Labour,Mexico,Markets,Latin America,Labour,Income,Health Effects,Fishworkers Organization,Fisheries Trade,Employment,Contamination,Aquaculture
4
No
174
Araneda D, Salas J, Pinto A and Alvarez M. 2005. Questioning invisibility. Yemaya, Issue 19, August 2005.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_19/803_art03.pdf
Role of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
This article is on women workers in the fisheries sector in Chile, who are are often not formally recognized or covered by social security.
Latin America
Women,Visibility,South America,Social Security,Income,Chile,Aquaculture
3
No
175
Iacomini F. 2006. Unaccounted and undervalued. Yemaya, Issue 21, March 2006.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_21/927_art01.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
Even though women are highly involved as workers in artisanal fisheries and in their communities, their roles have been constantly undermined and undervalued. This article looks at the situation in Chile.
Latin America
Women,SERNAPESCA,Reproductive Labour,Health,Gender,Fishing Communities,Employment Discrimination,Employment,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
176
Boegeholz M T L. 2006. Long road ahead. Yemaya, Issue 21, March 2006.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_21/928_art02.pdf
Status of Women N/a
Seeking allotments of management and exploitation areas can be a major challenge for women engaged in artisanal fisheries in Chile today. This article outlines the efforts of these women who have overcome major hurdles to enhance their basic competence and capacity to use new technologies, and to administer and manage their scarce economic resources.
Latin America
Women,Technology,South America,Seaweed,Fishing Rights,Fisheries Resources,Credit,Conservation,Chile,Artisanal Fisheries
4
No
177
Schärer R. 2006. A historic victory. Yemaya, Issue 22, September 2006.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_22/1158_art01.pdf
Struggles and Movements N/a
In March 2006, the Superior Federal Court of Justice, Brazil, ruled in favour of the rights of the community of Prainha do Canto Verde over their land. This article outlines the community's struggle to achieve this historic victory.
Latin America
Livelihood,Land,Human Rights,Fishing Village,Fishing Communities,Coastal Areas,Brazil
3
No
178
Skewes J C and Guerra D. 2006. Whose gain? Yemaya, Issue 22, September 2006.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_22/1159_art02.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Globalization N/a
The community of Mehuín, on the southern coast of Chile, is fighting against the polluting operations of the cellulose company, CELCO, in order to preserve the source of their livelihoods.
Latin America
Water Pollution,Waste Management,South America,Livelihood,Industries,Industrial Pollution,Impact,Fishing Communities,Coastal Areas,Chile
3
No
179
O’ Riordan B. 2006. Supporting the struggle. Yemaya, Issue 22, September 2006.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_22/1160_art03.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Globalization N/a
Many groups are providing support to the struggle being waged by the community of Mehuín in southern Chile to halt the latest move by the cellulose company, CELCO. This article is based on information provided by ECOCEANOS, Chile.
Latin America
Waste Management,South America,Industries,Industrial Pollution,Chile
3
No
180
Josupeit H. 2006. Networking to support. Yemaya, Issue 23, November 2006.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_23/1209_art03.pdf
Role of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
This is a report of the Latin American Network of Women working in the fisheries sector (NETWIF), which has been active for five years.
Latin America
Women,Training,Research and Development,Quality Control,Processing Units,PHF,Pacific,Occupational Safety,Markets,Latin America,Health,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,FAO,Employment,Artisanal Fisheries,Aquaculture
3
No
181
Brian O’Riordan. 2006. Sea Martyrs of San Antonio. Yemaya, Issue 23, November 2006.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_23/1208_art02.pdf
Role of Women N/a
This article is a compilation from various sources on out-of-work women encarnadoras (hook baiters) in Chile take up acting and win wide acclaim.
Latin America
Women,Informal Sector,Gender,Fishing Rights,Employment Discrimination,Employment,Baits,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
182
Lewis D. 1999. Women in the shellfishery. Yemaya, Issue 1, April 1999
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_1/12_art10.pdf
Role of Women,Globalization N/a
This article is a first person account by a fisher/aquaculturist, of women in the shellfishery in Prince Edward Island, Canada.
N. America
Women,Shellfish,Seafood Processing,Seafood Industry,Licence,Canada,Aquaculture
3
No
183
Duffett B. 2000. Low value or high value? Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/48_art02.pdf
Role of Women N/a
The article describes how the changes in fishery and processing technology have affected the nature of the work available to processing workers in Catalina, Newfoundland.
N. America
Women,Technology,Survival,Newfoundland,Livelihood,Fishing Industry,Fish Processing,Employment,Canada,Alternative Employment
3
No
184
Skinner M. 2000. We, women, are out there, fishing...Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/49_art03.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This article is a first person account by an inshore fisher from Harbour Breton, Newfoundland. She is the representative for inshore fishers at the Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union (FFAW/CAW) in her region. She says more women are fishing, although the going is not always smooth.
N. America
Women,Visibility,Reproductive Labour,Patriarchy,New Zealand,Health Effects,Fishermen,Canada
3
No
185
Knee D. 2000. A crabby life. Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/50_art04.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This article focuses on the issues faced by workers in snow crab processing plants, who are are prone to accidents, repetitive strain injuries, and other work-related illnesses.
N. America
Processing Units,Occupational Hazards,Health Effects,Health,Fishing Industry,Crab,Conditions of Work
3
No
186
Penton C, Cobb-Penton C and McCay B. 2000. Women are human too. Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/51_art05.pdf
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
This article is on women workers in Fogo Island on the northeast coast of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, who are demanding to be judged and rewarded according to their commitment, experience and ability.
N. America
Women,Unemployment,Policy,Markets,Legal Issues,Income,Employment,Canada
4
No
187
Lewis D. 2000. Cleaned Out. Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/53_art07.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This article is by a shellfisher from Brooklyn, Prince Edward Island, Canada. Women traditionally working as cleaners on oyster boats have found themselves forced out of their jobs.
N. America
Women,Unemployment,Traditional Fisheries,Patriarchy,Oyster,Licence,Employment Discrimination,Crab
3
No
188
Cormier D. 2000. Closing the gap. Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/56_art10.pdf
Status of Women N/a
Women from New Brunswick are concerned about equity in terms of women receiving equal pay for work of equal value, and equity in terms of access to the fisheries resource.
N. America
Women,Income,Fisheries Resources,Employment Discrimination,Coastal Communities,Access Rights
4
No
189
Desroches M. 2000. Profits for a few. Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/57_art11.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
This article is a first person account by a woman belonging to a Nova Scotia fishing family in Canada, on how the common person can never afford to become a fish harvester again due to the various strains and threats the sector faces.
N. America
Women,Technology,Livelihood,ITQ,Fishing Industry,Fish Harvesting,Community Based Management,Canada
4
No
190
Munro I. 2000. The invisible ones. Yemaya, Special Issue, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_-1/58_art12.pdf
Role of Women N/a
Nova Scotia fishing families cope with the loss of their identity when they can no longer fish.
N. America
Women,Survival,Livelihood,Income,Fisheries,Canada
4
No
191
Sharma C. 2000. Skirting the ban. Yemaya, Issue 3, March 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_3/30_art03.pdf
Struggles and Movements N/a
This article outlines how illegal trawling has taken a heavy toll on fishing communities in North Sumatra.
Asia
Trawling,Livelihood,Indonesia,Illegal Fishing,Fishworker Union,Fishermen,Environmental Management,Conflicts,Coastal Environment,Coastal Communities,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
192
Quist C. 1999. Fisherwomen as researchers. Yemaya, Issue 2, November 1999.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_2/18_art04.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Role of Women N/a
A community-based coastal resource management program in Philippines spear headed by women proves to be a fascinating learning process.
Asia
Women,Surveys,Resources Management,Research and Development,Philippines,Fishing Communities,Database
3
No
193
Kumara H. 2000. Whose problem? Yemaya, Issue 4, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_4/42_art04.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Role of Women N/a
Families of fishermen in foreign jails have a difficult time surviving. This article talks about the issues that women of fishing families face, when their fishermen husbands find themselves in foreign jails.
Asia
Women,Survival,Sri Lanka,Reproductive Labour,Livelihood,India,Fishermen,Fisheries Policy,Employment,Custody,Arrests
3
No
194
Indu M G. Life and Debt. 2000. Yemaya, Issue 5, December 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_5/62_art02.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
A woman fish vendor from Kerala, India, describes her life and the problems she had to deal with.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Survival,Reproductive Labour,Markets,Kerala,India,Income
3
No
195
Nayak N. 2001. Public Hearing. Yemaya, Issue 8, December 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_8/90_art06.pdf
Role of Women,Globalization N/a
At the end of September 2001 the Self Employed Women’s Association (SEWA), Kerala organized a Public Hearing on “The Impact of Globalization on Women Workers in Kerala”. Here, women workers in Kerala highlight how globalization processes affect them.
Asia
Working Conditions,Women,SEZ,Policy,Livelihood,Legal Issues,Labor Standards,Kerala,India,Income,Fishworker Union,Fish Processing
3
No
196
Shah M A. 2002. A bleak future. Yemaya, Issue 9, April 2002.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_9/94_art01.pdf
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
This article outlines the important roles that women in fishing communities in Pakistan play and how modernization of the fisheries sector has led to their increasing marginalization.
Asia
Women,PHF,PFF,Patriarchy,Pakistan,Labour,Income,Globalization,Fishing Communities
1
No
197
Sharma C. 2002. Coming together. Yemaya, Issue 9, April 2002.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_9/95_art02.pdf
Globalization N/a
This is a report of a meeting held beteen 25 to 29 January 2002 at Thailand, for the Asian Fisherfolk Conference: Cut Away the Net of Globalization, that focused on Asian fisheries in the era of globalization.
Asia
Women,Vietnam,Technology,Sustainable Development,Small Scale Fisheries,Resources Management,Philippines,Participatory Management,Indonesia,India,Globalization,Fishing Gear,China,Bangladesh,Asia,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
198
Mohan T. 2003. Planning Them Out? Excerpts from an affidavit filed before the National Commission on Women, India. Yemaya, Issue 13, July 2003.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_13/527_art03.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
Fishing communities settled along the coast of Chennai, a metropolitan city on India’s south-eastern coast, are being threatened with relocation in the name of beach beautification. This article is based on an affidavit presented by T Mohan, a Chennai-based lawyer long involved with various civic environmental and community-based organisations, before the National Commission on Women, India.
Asia
Tamil Nadu,Legislation,India,Fishing Communities,Displacement,Development,CRZ,Coastal Development,Coastal Areas,Beach
3
No
199
Ismail S. 2003. “Pay for it”. Yemaya, Issue 14, December 2003.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_14/482_art03.pdf
Globalization N/a
People in Buyat Bay, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, have been affected by the mining operations of PT. Newmont Minahasa Raya, a subsidiary of Newmont Mining Corporation, based in Denver, Colorado, USA. This article talks about the struggle of particularly one woman to make Newmont Mining Corporation accountable.
Asia
Water Pollution,Toxins,Mining,Livelihood,Industries,Indonesia,Human Rights,Health Effects,Fishing Communities,Contamination
3
No
200
2004. A Feminist Perspective. Statement adopted at the Asian Regional Consultation on Women in Fisheries, Medan, Indonesia, 11 -14 August 2004. Yemaya, Issue 17, December 2004.
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_17/571_art02.pdf
Globalization N/a
This Statement was adopted at the Asian Regional Consultation on Women in Fisheries, held in Medan, Indonesia, from 11 to 14 August 2004.
Asia
Women,Trawling,Sustainable Management,Resources Management,Livelihood,India,Income,ICAM,Human Rights,Globalization,Fishing Communities,Environmental Management,DFT,Coastal Fisheries,Coastal Development,Asia,Aquaculture,Access Rights
3
No
201
Lewis D. 2001. And so we Meet Again. Yemaya, Issue 7, August 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_7/84_art07.pdf
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
This article is a report of a meeting to mark the first anniversary of the Workshop on Gender, Globalization and Fisheries held in May 2000.
Women,Shellfish,Occupational Hazards,Health,Globalization,Gender,Communication,Coastal Communities,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
202
Cordozo S. 2000. Not amusing. Yemaya, Issue 4, August 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_4/43_art05.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
Fishing communities of Gorai, Culvem and Manori in Mumbai, India, have been affected by the country's first and largest amusement park, Essel World. Not only have the livelihoods of these communities been affected, but also the ecology and rich ecosystem of the area. Women, particularily, have been at the forefront of the struggle against such development activities.
Asia
Tourism,NFF,Mangroves,Maharashtra,Livelihood,Legal Issues,Land,India,Fishing Communities,CRZ,Conservation,Coastal Development
3
No
203
Baldera C V and Diaz J C. 2001. We don’t wish to compete. Yemaya, Issue 7, August 2001.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_7/516_art06.pdf
N/a
The article marks the gradual but firm progress in Peru's artisanal fishing industry where women are now included in the social organizations of artisanal fishworkers.
Latin America
Women,South America,Reproductive Labour,Peru,Health,Gender,Fishing Communities,Education,Culture,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
204
NCLR. 2001. Harsh working conditions. Letter to to the Union Ministry of Labour, India. Yemaya, Issue 6, April 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_6/76_art06.pdf
Status of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
The National Campaign on Labour Rights (NCLR), India—a network of trade unions and other support groups—has initiated a campaign to highlight the exploitative conditions of work faced by women workers in fish processing plants in India. We carry the letter written by NCLR to the Union Ministry of Labour, India.
Asia
Women,Wages,Processing Units,Occupational Hazards,Migrants,Living Conditions,Labour Rights,Labour,India,Hygiene,Health,Fishing Industry,Disease
3
No
205
Ahmed T. 2004. Not a rosy picture. Yemaya, Issue 17, December 2004.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_17/572_art03.pdf
Status of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
Conditions of work of women workers in Pakistan's warrahs (sheds for processing fish), leave much to be desired, highlighting problems in the implementation of existing labour laws.
Asia
Women,Processing Units,Pakistan,Legislation,Labour,Informal Sector,Income,Health,Fish Processing,Empowerment,Conditions of Work
3
No
206
Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum (PFF). 2005. Ready for the struggle. Yemaya, Issue 20, December 2005.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_20/885_art03.pdf
Status of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
Pakistan’s first-ever fisherwomen’s convention took place in July 2005, as a large assembly of women from the fishing villages of Sindh. This articles details the issues that were brought to the fore and also includes the resolutions that were passed at the convention.
Asia
Women,Water Pollution,Reproductive Labour,Poverty,PFF,Pakistan,Livelihood,Human Rights,Health,Education,Contamination
4
No
207
Nayak N. 2006. Development for whom? Yemaya, Issue 22, September 2006.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_22/1162_art05.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This article is based on a study by the author and two other researchers, on the impact of development on coastal population dynamics and the environment in three locations on the west coast of India. Although incomes have increased as fishing becomes more technology- and capital-intensive, they often do not translate into a better quality of life for the fishing community, particularly for women.
Asia
Women,Wages,Trawling,Survival,Sanitation,Migrants,Livelihood,Labour,India,Impact,Conditions of Work,Coastal Development,Coastal Communities
3
No
208
Sall A. 1999. Women as leaders. Yemaya, Issue 1, April 1999.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_1/3_art01.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
Established in 1987, the CNPS (Collectif National des Pêcheurs Artisanaux du Sénégal) is a movement born out of the artisanal fishing communities in Sénégal. The article outlines how after an internal struggle in CNPS, women today occupy roles and responsibilities they did not have when the movement began.
Africa
Women,Tourism,Senegal,Patriarchy,Organizations,Informal Sector,Fisheries Agreements,EU,Empowerment,Coastal Development,Artisanal Fisheries,Africa,Access Agreements
3
No
209
Nakato M. 2000. Fishing pioneers. Yemaya, Issue 3, March 2000.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_3/28_art01.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Role of Women N/a
This article is about a dynamic group of women, the Katosi Women's Fishing Group, who are engaged in fishing in Lake Victoria, Africa.
Africa
Women,Uganda,Pollution,PHF,Patriarchy,Nile Perch,Lake Victoria,Income,Fish Processing,Fish Landing Centres,Credit,Alternative Employment,Africa
3
No
210
Nayak N. 2001. Proud of their achievements. Yemaya, Issue 6, April 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_6/72_art02.pdf
Role of Women N/a
An enterprising group of women from a remote island in Mozambique, got together to increase their income. This article details how they went about it and achieved their goal.
Africa
Women,Vendors,PHF,Markets,Fish Processing,Benin,Africa
3
No
211
Diakite I L. 2001. The tireless one. Yemaya, Issue 7, August 2001.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_7/82_art04.pdf
Role of Women N/a
This is a poem prepared for the West African fair for artisanally processed fish.
Africa
Women,West Africa,Vendors,Reproductive Labour,Livelihood,Artisanal Fisheries
3
No
212
Chando C. 2002. Women are capable. Yemaya, Issue 10, August 2002.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_10/104_art01.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Role of Women N/a
This article is based on the author's Master’s thesis titled 'Gender roles in fishery planning and projects: A case study of coastal region in Tanzania', completed in 2002. Active participation of women in the planning stages of fishery projects along the coastal Tanzania has led to the success of these projects.
Women,Tanzania,PHF,Participatory Management,MPA,Marine Parks,Livelihood,Gender,Fishing Industry,Empowerment,Dynamite Fishing,Co-management,Africa
3
No
213
Sunde J. 2002. On the brink. Yemaya, Issue 11, November 2002.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_11/112_art01.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
Traditional fishing communities in South Africa are struggling to find a secure future in the sector. This article outlines their struggles and the various issues they face.
Africa
Women,Traditional Fisheries,South Africa,Quota,ITQ,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Economy,Fish Processing
3
No
214
Medard M. 2003. What next? Yemaya, Issue 12, April 2003.
documents
http://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_12/122_art05.pdf
Status of Women,Globalization N/a
Women are constantly struggling to retain a role in the export-oriented fisheries of Lake Victoria. This article, which is based on the author's research, talks about the important roles that women play in fisheries in Lake Victoria and how these roles have been challenged by globalization.
Africa
Women,Transportation,PHF,Nile Perch,Lake Victoria,Informal Sector,Income,Food Security,Fisheries Economy,Fish Processing,Exports,Employment Discrimination,Employment,Africa
4
No
215
Johnstone R. 2003. A more central role. Yemaya, Issue 14, December 2003.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_14/480_art05.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
This article is about the women in the Bay of Maputo in Mozambique, Africa, who are at the heart of the local fisheries economy. Despite their vital economic role, they have not yet been given their rightful place in local fisheries management.
Africa
Women,Mozambique,Labour,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Management,Fisheries Economy,Artisanal Fisheries,Africa
3
No
216
Sunde J. 2004. “Small fry” Yemaya, Issue 15, March 2004.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_15/131_art01.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Recognition and Policy N/a
This is a report of the fisher people’s human rights hearings in Western Cape, South Africa held in August 2003.
Africa
WSSD,Traditional Fisheries,TAC,South Africa,Socio-economic Aspects,Small Scale Fisheries,Quota,NGO,Livelihood,Legal Issues,ITQ,Impact,Human Rights,Gender,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Policy,Artisanal Fisheries,Access Rights
4
No
217
Bennett E. 2004. Room to Manoeuvre. Yemaya, Issue 15, March 2004.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_15/132_art02.pdf
Status of Women,Role of Women N/a
A workshop titled 'Room to Manoeuvre: Gender and Coping Strategies in the Fisheries Sector' held in Cotonou, Benin in West Africa in December 2003, explored the coping strategies being adopted by women of fisheries-dependent households.
Africa
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Reproductive Labour,Informal Sector,Impact,Fishing Communities,Benin,Africa
3
No
218
le Sann A. 2005. Hopes amidst the nightmare. Yemaya, Issue 20, December 2005.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_20/883_art01.pdf
Globalization N/a
During a recent tour of France, Margaret Nakato, leader of the Katosi Women Fishing and Development Association (KWFDA) in Uganda, met consumers, Breton fishermen, and NGOs as well as Herbert Sauper, who wrote and directed Darwin’s Nightmare, the vivid and controversial documentary film on the Nile Perch fisheries in Kenya. In this interview from 18 October 2005, Margaret discusses the film and the importance of networking among the fishworkers’ organizations of the South.
Africa
Women,WFF,Uganda,Standards,Pollution,Nile Perch,Lake Victoria,GDP,Fishworkers Organization,Fisheries Economy,EU,Africa
3
No
219
Lambeth L. 1999. What’s ‘fishing’? Yemaya, Issue 2, November 1999.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_2/21_art07.pdf
Status of Women N/a
This article elaborates on the lack of recognition and support of women's roles in fisheries in the Pacific Islands.
Oceania
Women,Training,SPC,Small Scale Fisheries,Pacific Islands,Fisheries Development,Education
3
No
220
Novaczek I. 2004. A sea of options. Yemaya, Issue 15, March 2004.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_15/133_art03.pdf
N/a
This article is on sea plants and how they offer a promising option for women in coastal communities to develop small businesses
Oceania
Women,Trade,Seaweeds,Pacific Islands,Markets,Livelihood,Income,Exports,Employment,Coastal Communities
3
No
221
Quist C. 2000. A village built with fish… Yemaya, Issue 5, December 2000.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_5/67_art07.pdf
Role of Women N/a
In Urk, the well-known fishing village of the Netherlands, a woman talks of her twenty-six years as a worker in the fish processing industry.
Europe
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Netherlands,Labour,Informal Sector,Health,Europe,Employment,Conditions of Work
3
No
222
O’Riordan B. 2001. Information is Strength. Yemaya, Issue 8, December 2001.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_8/86_art01.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
Women from fishing communities and women supporters from Spain, France, Holland, and Norway met in Brussels from 19 to 22 November 2001 to exchange experiences and to discuss the review process of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). This is a report of the meeting.
Europe
Working Conditions,Women,Spain,Reproductive Labour,Norway,Labour,Holland,Health,France,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Management,Fisheries Information,Europe,Coastal Fisheries
3
No
223
Quist C. 2001. Our First Steps. Yemaya, Issue 8, December 2001.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_8/88_art04.pdf
Role of Women N/a
The Women in Fisheries Network of the Netherlands, VinVis, has now been in existence for one year. This article describes its journey, its highlights, and limitations.
Europe
Women,Netherlands,Fishworkers Organization,Fishing Industry,Fisheries Trade,Europe,Empowerment,Auction
3
No
224
Quist C. 2002. Challenging stereotypes. Yemaya, Issue 11, November 2002.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_11/115_art05.pdf
Recognition and Policy N/a
This article reports on VinVis, the Women in Fisheries Network of the Netherlands, two years after it was started.
Europe
Women,Visibility,Netherlands,Fishing Communities,Europe,Empowerment
3
No
225
Quist C. 2003. A new world? Yemaya, Issue 12, April 2003.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_12/524_art01.pdf
Role of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
This articles talks about how women’s roles in European fisheries have finally been given due attention, but there is still a long way to go before women get the real recognition they deserve
Europe
Women,Wages,Meetings,Informal Sector,Fishing Industry,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Policy,Fisheries Development,Fish Processing,Europe,Employment Discrimination,CFP
3
No
226
Groen M. 2003. Penalized for what? Yemaya, Issue 13, July 2003.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_13/129_art05.pdf
Status of Women N/a
This article is on the shrimp fisher community from Netherlands, which faces problems due to the initiatives they undertook aspiring for a better life and environmentally sound fisheries
Europe
Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Seafood Industry,Netherlands,Livelihood,Fish Harvesting,EU,Employment,Aquaculture
3
No
227
Soler C S. 2003. Shaking up traditions. Yemaya, Issue 14, December 2003.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_14/484_art01.pdf
Struggles and Movements N/a
This article is about a women’s association from El Pamar, Valencia, Spain, which challenges the age-old patrilineal system in which only the male offspring of fisherfolk inherit the rights to fish
Europe
Women,Spain,Livelihood,Legal Issues,Fishworkers Organization,Fishing Rights,EU,Employment,Culture
3
No
228
Cougot R. 2004. A winner of battles and hearts. Yemaya, Issue 16, August 2004.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_16/549_art05.pdf
Struggles and Movements,Status of Women N/a
This article is a portrait of Jeannette, a fishworker from France whose life is characterized by buoyancy.
Europe
Women,Social Issues,Social Development,Safety at Work,Labour Rights,Human Rights,France,Fishing Harbour,Europe,Employment,Conditions of Work
3
No
229
Koster W. 2004. Bouncing back. Yemaya, Issue 17, December 2004.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_17/573_art04.pdf
Role of Women,Development Initiatives N/a
This article is about women in the fishing community of Wieringen, who have revived the local economy by creating a local fresh fish market.
Europe
Women,Vendors,NGO,Netherlands,Markets,Fishing Communities,Fisheries Economy,EU
3
No
230
Gerrard S. 2006. Women, men and fishing quotas. Yemaya, Issue 22, September 2006.
documents
http://icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_22/1163_art06.pdf
Status of Women N/a
This article details how the professionalization of the coastal fishing fleet and the introduction of fish quotas have further marginalized women in Norway's fishing industry
Europe
Women,TAC,Quota,Norway,Fishing Industry,Fishing Fleet,Fisheries Management,Coastal Fisheries
3
No
231
Gätke P. Women’s Participation in Community Fisheries Committees in Cambodia. Master's thesis. Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University.
documents
rudar.ruc.dk/bitstream/1800/3630/1/P.GätkeThesis2008.pdf
Women and Resources Management,Role of Women N/a
In a context of widespread poverty and pressure on natural resources, the Cambodian government has launched community management of the fisheries resource. In a generally male dominated political and socio-cultural sphere in Cambodia, few women partake in the local management of the fisheries resources. Through empirical investigations carried out in the Tonle Sap region, women’s participation in Community Fisheries Committees (CFCs) is examined. This is done with regard to the development potential of their participation, as well as the likely future participation of women in CFCs. The investigations reveal that women’s participation strengthens and improves the work of the CFCs in the areas of participation, communication, awareness, good governance and enforcement. In addition women address social issues, including immediate livelihood needs of the poor. These contributions show significant consistency with areas found important in relation to achieving the objectives of the Sub-Decree of Community Fisheries Management.

Despite the emergence of a political framework, formally ensuring women equal right to participate, in practice things change slowly. Women are strongly underrepresented in CFCs, and therefore their strengths and skills, in relation to the above mentioned areas of management, are only sporadically applied. Explanations for this by and large relate to cultural and traditional patterns, which are generally found to be in-conducive to women’s participation in the political landscape. However, women’s participation in politics is on the rise, with still more women being elected at commune council elections, as well as at village level CFC elections. As a consequence of women’s participation in CFCs, villagers’ perception of their ability to carry out work in the committees is changing, as they witness that women can contribute significantly.
Asia
Women,Sustainable Fisheries,Resources Management,Participation,Gender,Cambodia
3
No
232
Novaczek, Irene; Susan Fitzpatrick; Sara Roach-Lewis and Jean Mitchell. 2009. At the table: exploring women's roles in the PEI fishery.
books
http://www.upei.ca/iis/files/iis/ATTJuly27screen.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
In Atlantic Canada, despite having one of the most advanced (and expensive) fisheries management systems in the world, we have driven our greatest fishery - the northern cod- to commercial extinction. This has caused the loss of jobs and identity for tens of thousands of fishworkers and widespread agony in coastal communities where, for generations, the fishery had been the backbone of the local economy, social networks and culture. One of the unexplored, largely invisible factor as suggested by this report, is the absence of women and young people in the 'advanced' management systems, the effects of these absences are inestimable. This research report, focuses on who should be at the table, making decisions. The people interviewed, also raise questions such as how can the management system incorporate the wisdom and experience of fishers who have spent decades on the water and fishing families who have incredible knowledge and insight from the shore, how to remove politics from decision-making and how to build on a new system that takes into account the impacts of management decisions on people who depend on fishing? The reports aims to raise awareness and understanding of women's contribution to the fishery, recommend ways to make fisheries management more inclusive and effective, inspire and empower women who want to take their place at the management table and strengthen the social economy organizations working in the fisheries sector.
Oceania
Fisheries Management,Decision Making
4
No
233
Quist, Cornelie; Leonore Poloton-De la Cruz and ICSF. 2008. Integrating a gender perspective in CBCRM approaches: A review of experiences and best practices of Oxfam Novib partners in Southeast Asia and other efforts from world wide.
documents
Women and Resources Management N/a
The aim of this report is to provide Oxfam Novib and its partners engaged in Community-
based Coastal Resource Management (CBCRM) in the Southeast Asia region, with insights on
integrating a gender perspective in the practice of CBCRM. The report provides an analysis
of gender relations prevailing in coastal communities in Southeast Asia and the key gender
issues in coastal resources management. It outlines successful strategies and experiences of
gender integration in approaches and actions in coastal resources management.
Asia
Resources Management,Co-management,Community Based Management,Gender
4
No
234
Quist, Cornelie; Leonore Poloton-De la Cruz and ICSF. 2008. Integrating a gender perspective in CBCRM approaches: A review of experiences and best practices of Oxfam Novib partners in Southeast Asia and other efforts from world wide. (French)
documents
Women and Resources Management N/a
Asia
Gender
4
No
235
Quist, Cornelie; Leonore Poloton-De la Cruz and ICSF. 2008. Integrating a gender perspective in CBCRM approaches: A review of experiences and best practices of Oxfam Novib partners in Southeast Asia and other efforts from world wide. (In Spanish)
documents
Women and Resources Management N/a
Asia
Gender
4
No
236
ICSF.2010. Women fish vendors in India: An information booklet
documents
Role of Women,Recognition and Policy N/a
Women fishworkers in India, as in other parts of the world, play critical roles within the fisheries and fishing communities, roles that are often not recognized or supported. Women are particularly active in postharvest fisheries; in marine fishing communities in India, for example, women comprise about 75 per cent of those engaged in fish marketing. They contribute in significant ways to the food security needs of a diverse range of consumers.What are the problems women fish vendors face on a regular basis? How have women organized themselves to deal with these problems? What are some of the initiatives, governmental and non-governmental, that have been taken to support women fishworkers? What are the various policy spaces available that women can use to seek greater recognition of their work and their livelihoods within the fisheries?
These are some of the issues that this booklet attempts to explore. Section One provides information on fish vending and vendors, the problems faced by women fish vendors, and some of the organizational initiatives they have taken to protect their livelihoods. Section Two is divided into three parts. The first compiles post-harvest, fisheries-specific schemes and initiatives undertaken by Central and State Fisheries Departments, as well as by central research institutions and intergovernmental organizations. The second part examines the provisions of the National Policy on Urban Street Vendors and its implications for fish vendors. The third part analyzes the Unorganized Workers’ Social Security Act, 2008, from the perspective of fish vendors.
Asia
4
No
237
Crawford, Brian; Maria D. Herrera, Nelvia Hernandez, Carlos Rivas Leclair, Narriman Jiddawi, Semba Masumbuko and Maria Lewis. 2010. Small scale fisheries management: lessons from cockle harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania. Basins and Coasts. Volume 2. Issue 4. March 2010
newsletters
http://www.imcafs.org/coastsheds/issues/vol2issue4article2.pdf
Women and Resources Management N/a
The Sustainable Coastal Communities and Ecosystems (SUCCESS) Program, funded by the United States
Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by the Coastal Resources Center (CRC) in partnership with the University of Hawaii Hilo (UHH) and several regional partners set out to test the premise that the general Fiji-style model for managing women-dominated small scale cockle fisheries using a co-management approach coupled with no-take
reserves has high potential for transferability worldwide. This article describes two initiatives for co-management of women-dominated cockle (Anadara spp.) fisheries—one implemented on Zanzibar Island of Tanzania and another implemented in Nicaragua—that were based on the Fiji model.
Latin America,Africa
Women,Resources Management
4
No
238
Soumare, Arona. 2006.. Senegal Role of Women in a Model of Community Management of Fish Resources and Marine Environments, Cayar. Gender and Water Alliance
documents
http://www.genderandwater.org/page/5822
Community based management,Women and Resources Management N/a
This case study highlights the role of women in fisheries and coastal resource management in Cayar, Senegal. This has often been looked at from a post-harvest perspective. The model of fish resources and marine environment management in Cayar is the result of a long process, which draws its source from traditional fishing practices in which women are not just marginal players but active participants.
Africa
Women,Senegal,Microfinance,Gender,Community Based Management,Coastal Resources
5
Women focus
No
239
Aswani, Shankar and Pam Weiant. Scientific Evaluation in Women's Participatory Management: Monitoring Marine Marine Invertebrate Refugia in the Solomon Islands.
documents
Women and Resources Management Solomon Islands
This paper summarizes the results of a women's community-based marine protected area that has been successful in sustaining invertebrate biological resources and in promoting strong community support. We outline the project and the associated biological results, describe the processes involved in attaining a committed level of community participation, and review the lessons learned during the project's implementation. We attribute the project's preliminary success-improved shellfish biomass, enhanced local environmental awareness, and the reinvigoration of cultural management practices-to the following factors: I) the high level of participatory involvement and community leadership; 2) the local perception that shell beds have recovered rapidly and the role that scientific evaluation has played in reinforcing this notion; 3) a research program that is cross-fertilizing indigenous and scientific ecological knowledge; 4) the unique marine tenure system that allows for the project's development and the area's policing; and 5) the tangible economic incentives created by the development project, which ultimately empowers local women. We hope that the project's findings can be generalized to other regions of the world with operational sea-tenure regimes and that it can help to make the establishing of community-based marine protected areas (CBMPAs) across the Pacific region more effective.
Oceania
Women,Tenure and Use,Shellfish,MPA,LMMPA,Indigenous Knowledge
4
Focus on women
No
240
Sultana, P., P.M. Thompson and M. Ahmed. 2002. Women-led Fisheries Management – A Case Study from Bangladesh..
documents
Women and Resources Management,Community based management Bangladesh
Although women constitute 50% of the total population of Bangladesh, only 18% are economically involved in the total labor force. They are involved in diversified work within their homesteads. However, during times of family needs and economic crisis, women are involved in non-traditional jobs. In the fisheries sector, Muslim women are traditionally not involved in fishing but they are involved in fish drying and salting. In the Hindu dominated areas such as Goakhola-Hatiara, women are involved in fish catch as well as the collection of other aquatic resources as one of their livelihood strategies. Women and subsistence fishers are taking the lead in managing a common capture fishery resource in Goakhola-Hatiara with the support from an NGO for perhaps the first time in Bangladesh. However, the role of women in the Beel Management Committee is not well defined. Under the leadership of women the socio-economic conditions have changed and the social capital has increased.
Asia
Women,Community Based Management
4
One of the few women-focused papers
No
241
Ko, Jae-Young, Glenn A. Jones, Moon-Soo Heob, Young-Su Kang, Sang-Hyuck Kang. 2010. A fifty-year production and economic assessment of common property-based management of marine living common resources: A case study for the women divers communities in Jeju, South Korea. Marine Policy 34: 624–634
documents
Women and Resources Management N/a
The authors examined the conditions of successful common property-based management for coastal marine living resources, using a case of historically and anthropologically well established women divers communities on Jeju Island, South Korea, focusing on their decentralized work rules and production records. Since the 1960s, their customary rights to fishing have been institutionalized by relevant national laws. However, since the 1970s, their numbers have declined under new local, national, and global challenges. Due to their tight social network and work rule, the women divers have harvested coastal marine living resources with limited fishing pressure exclusively from their village fishing grounds for over 400 years. Even though the women divers have worked together to improve the habitats for their target seaweeds and have banned the use of scuba diving equipment, their production records show that short-term economic gains play a more significant role than long-term efforts to conserve and protect their marine living resources. Thus, their harvest patterns have been mostly reactive to market prices, eventually requiring direct governmental regulations such as total allowable catch in some cases. Second, there has been limited opportunity for the women divers to understand their village fishing grounds from a scientific perspective. Integrating scientific findings into managerial decisions of the coastal ecosystem is vital for a sustainable marine ecosystem. Third, more lucrative and socially prestigious jobs have been available for women in Jeju, following nation-wide economic development, resulting in significant out-migration of the women from diving work. Fourth, the production of abalone and seaweeds has been declining, attributable to multiple factors. Most recently, the communities have been experiencing multiple challenges: their aging population, water pollution in the coastal zone, competition with cultured products and imported seafood, and expanding barren grounds. These challenges demand a multi-scale/dimensional response if the women divers communities are to keep their village fishing grounds and communities sustainable.
Asia
Property rights,Fishing Grounds,CPR,Co-management
4
No
242
Mehra, Rekham Margaret Alcott and Nilda S. Baling. 1993.. Women’s Participation in the Cogtong Bay Mangrove Management Project: A Case Study. International Center for Research on Women, Washington D.C. and WWF, Washington D.C.
documents
Community based management,Women and Resources Management Philippines
Te objective of ‘The Gender Factor in Community Development and Resource Management Project’ of which this study is a part, is to heighten awareness of the critical roles women play in natural resource management and sustainable development, and to strengthen the skills of the staff involved in the preparation and implementation of these projects. This case study of the Cogtong Bay Mangrove Management Project in the Philippines takes an in-depth look at the issue. It examines the extent and nature of women’s resource management roles and of their involvement in the project. In addition the case study identifies ways to enhance women’s participation in conservation and resource management.
Asia
Women,Resources Management,Mangroves,Gender,Community Based Management
5
No
243
Di Ciommo, Regina C. and Alexandre Schiavetti. Women participation in the management of a Marine Protected Area in Brazil. Ocean & Coastal Management 62 (2012) 15e23. doi:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.02.010
documents
Women and Resources Management,Social Issues in MPAs,Role of Women Brazil
The Marine Extractive Reserve Corumbau, a MPA unit, was created for the sustainable use of fishing
resources. The exclusive right over resources requires that its population of fishermen and fisherwomen have consistent and equitable participation in the decision-making for an effective co-management. This research considers the importance of incorporating women’s experiences and knowledge in the MPA management. We aimed to know the working conditions of women involved in fishing at the Corumbau MPA and reasons that affect their participation in management and decision-making. We have heard fisherwomen and shellfish collectors of three communities, during two consecutive years, through interviews and participative observations. Women’s participation in meetings of MERC is limited and hampered by factors related to gender, unmet expectations, lack of information. The dynamics of the meetings and the decision-making process need to address specific women’s needs and priorities, with gender sensitive measures. Increasing women’s rights at MERC and hearing their voices could lead to significant impacts on personal and collective levels, benefiting the communities as a whole. Measures directed to inform, motivate and support them could increase their degree of confidence in comanagement and increase their participation, with positive reflections on conservation and socioeconomical conditions.
Latin America
Women,Participatory Management,MPA,Extractive Reserves
1
No
244
Walker, Barbara Louise Endemano and Michael A. Robinson. Economic development, marine protected areas and gendered access to fishing resources in a Polynesian lagoon. Gender, Place & Culture. 16 (2009)4:467 — 484. DOI: 10.1080/09663690903003983
documents
Social Issues in MPAs,Right to Resources French Polynesia
This study examines the potential socio-spatial impacts of a new series of marine protected areas (MPAs) on fishers in Moorea, French Polynesia. The establishment of the MPAs is contextualized within recent and historical processes of economic development and theories of women in development and gender, culture and development. Seventy adults from three neighborhoods in Moorea were interviewed. Analysis of the data provides new information about the characteristics of fishing in Moorea. Unlike most fishing cultures and communities throughout the Pacific Islands, men and women in Moorea have similar, as opposed to segregated, spatial patterns of fishing activities and fishing methods. The study also points out the potential negative impacts of the MPAs on both men and women, particularly younger and lower-income fishers.
Australia/Oceania
Women,MPA,GIS,Gender,Access Rights
5
No
245
De Silva, D.A.M. 2011. Faces of women in global fishery value chains: Female involvement, impact and importance in the fisheries of developed and developing countries. NORAD/FAO Value Chain Project, 2011.
documents
Role of Women World
Fisheries and aquaculture provides employment and livelihood for both men and women. Modern fisheries and aquaculture value chains are diverse, often complex and dynamic, with men and women undertaking different and changing roles depending on culture, values, attitudes and norms concerning resource access and control, mobility, type of technology involved, the extent of commercialisation, and the product involved. In general women are involved more on the lower levels of the fishery value chains having less access to resources and decision making. In contrast, women having higher education levels or having access to resources are involved in the higher levels of the fishery value chains enjoying better benefits. Regardless of gender-role differences, wealthier groups of both women and men play dominant role in the value chain, and they focus more on high value ends. Deprived members have weak bargaining power, little control over resources and prices in the value chain, and they are more vulnerable. Generally, men invest in fishing vessels, nets, other gears, pond construction and are involved more on production. On the other hand, women investing more in processing equipment and they are responsible for fish purchasing, processing, and retailing however, this differs in every fishing area and country.
General
Women,Value,Gender,Fisheries
4
No
246
Britton. Easkey, Women as agents of wellbeing in Northern Ireland’s fishing households. Maritime Studies 2012, 11:16
documents
http://www.maritimestudiesjournal.com/content/11/1/16
Role of Women United Kingdom
This paper focuses on the gender dimensions of wellbeing in fishing households in Northern Ireland. The impact of change in the fishing industry on women’s wellbeing is outlined and linkages are made between changing access to fish and changing roles of women in fishing households. The paper explores what this change means for how women perceive and pursue their wellbeing needs and aspirations and how they negotiate their needs with the needs of the household. In an occupation as gender biased as fishing it is argued that in order for fisheries management and policy to be successful, a profile of what really matters to people is important. In particular, the paper highlights how such priorities link to the complex and dynamic role of women in fishing households.
Europe
Women,well being,Fisheries
5
No
247
De Silva, Achini, Trond Bjorndal, and Audun Lem. Role of Gender in Global Fishery Value Chains: A Feminist Perspective on Activity, Access and Control Profile. Aquafish CRSP Proceedings: IIFET Special Session July 2012.
documents
Role of Women Zimbabwe
Women in fishing communities play multidimensional roles. Women pervade fisheries and their roles were identified as workers in both fisheries, markets, processing plants and non-fishery, mothers who give birth to successors, as caregivers of the family, as connecting agents of social networks, as representatives of local culture, as community workers and governors. The main aim of this study is to identify and measure women’s involvement in global fishery value chains and investigating their activity, access and control profiles in fishery value chains in selected destinations in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Primary data were obtained from fisheries and aquaculture operations in Thailand, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Zimbabwe and Honduras. Participant observation with experienced investigators, focus group discussion and gender resources maps were the principal data collection tools. Women play non-significant roles in capture fishery production and totally depend on religion and culture while their contribution in aquaculture production is great. Female roles were centred on household activities which take them away from direct income generation and access to the capital assets. Less educated, resource poor women are concentrated in the low value end of the value chains while the high value end of the value chains is mainly handled by the resource rich males and limited number of educated, resourced owned females. Women’s engagement is less in modern value chains with few nodes than the traditional complex and lengthier value chains.
Central America,Asia,Africa
Women,Value,Gender,Fisheries
4
No
248
Hauzera, Melissa, Philip Dearden and Grant Murray. The fisherwomen of Ngazidja island, Comoros: Fisheries livelihoods, impacts, and implications for management. Fisheries Research 140 (2013) 28– 35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2012.12.001
documents
Role of Women Comoros
Research on women in fisheries tends to focus on their roles as processors and vendors, but rarely on their direct engagement in fishing and harvesting activities. As such, the contribution of fisherwomen to household income, food security, and even marine conservation is often overlooked. This case-study is a preliminary examination of artisanal fisherwomen in three communities on Ngazidja island, Comoros. Though women on Ngazidja have fished for generations, authorities have recently attempted to ban them from fishing as their practices are considered destructive to near-shore reefs and juvenile fish populations. The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to document and examine women’s fishing methods, impacts, and contributions to coastal livelihoods and food security on Ngazidja, and second, to make recommendations on potential management interventions. Qualitative methods were used to gather information on fisherwomen’s harvesting activities, fisheries knowledge, livelihood contributions, perceptions of resource status conditions, and informal management practices. Results indicate that women’s fishing methods can be destructive and may have contributed to localized declines in intertidal marine resources and habitats. Yet, fisherwomen also provide substantial contributions to household livelihoods and food security. Thus, banning the fishery altogether is not an acceptable solution. Instead, authorities should work to empower fisherwomen with the tools necessary to manage their fishery sustainably, which will eventually lead to improved conservation measures.
Africa
Livelihood,Gender,Food Security,Fisheries,Artisanal Fisheries
4
No
249
Kwena, Zachary A., Carol S. Camlin, Chris A. Shisanya, Isaac Mwanzo and Elizabeth A. Bukusi. Short-Term Mobility and the Risk of HIV Infection among Married Couples in the Fishing Communities along Lake Victoria, Kenya PLoS ONE 8(1): e54523. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054523
documents
Role of Women Kenya
Mobility has long been associated with high HIV prevalence. We sought to assess sex differences in the relationship between mobility and risk for HIV infection among married couples in the fishing communities. We conducted 1090 gender-matched interviews and rapid HIV testing with 545 couples proportionally representing all the different sizes of the fish-landing beaches in Kisumu County. We contacted a random sample of fishermen as our index participants and asked them to enrol in the study together with their spouses. The consenting couples were separated into different private rooms for concurrent interviews and thereafter reunited for couple rapid HIV counselling and testing. In addition to socio-economic and behavioural data, we collected information on overnight travels and divided couples in 4 groups as follows both partners not mobile, both partners mobile, only woman mobile, and only man mobile. Other than descriptive statistics, we used X2 and U tests to compare groups of variables and multivariate logistic regression to measure association between mobility and HIV infection. Results: We found significant differences in the number of trips women travelled in the preceding month (mean 4.6, SD 7.1) compared to men (mean 3.3, SD 4.9; p,0.01) and when the women did travel, they were more likely to spend more days away from home than their male partners (mean 5.2 [SD 7.2] versus 3.4 SD 5.6; p = 0.01). With an HIV prevalence of 22.7% in women compared to 20.9% among men, mobile women who had non-mobile spouses had 2.1 times the likelihood of HIV infection compared to individuals in couples where both partners were non-mobile. We conclude that the mobility of fishermen’s spouses is associated with HIV infection that is not evident among fishermen themselves. Therefore, interventions in this community could be a combination of sex-specific programming that targets women and combined programming for couples.
Africa
Women,Health,Fishing Communities,AIDS
5
No
250
Olufayo, M. O. The Gender Roles of Women in Aquaculture and Food Security in Nigeria. IIFET 2012 Tanzania Proceedings
documents
Role of Women Nigeria
Women are recognized as agents of changes and development .Their involvement in aquaculture is one issue that needs to be addressed when dealing with rural communities and poverty alleviation among the rural women .The major way to ensure that women utilize their full potentials in profitable aquaculture is to provide capacity building support which would eventually lead to poverty alleviation among them .The role of women in adopting new aquaculture technology has been restricted and often ignored because of the socio-cultural taboos against them. This paper enlightens women on the different stages of production in aquaculture that they could be involved in, as fishers for home consumption, they contribute significantly to the nutritional needs of their families. The idea is to empower the women with modern technologies in aquaculture to generate enough revenue to sustain their families and save the society from menace of fish scarcity. When women are involved in aquaculture production, it will go a long way in achieving the millennium development goals of eradicating extreme poverty, hunger and empowering women in Nigeria.
Africa
Women,Food Security,Empowerment,Aquaculture
4
No
251
Weeratunge, Nireka, Katherine A Snyder and Choo Poh Sze. Gleaner, fisher, trader, processor: understanding gendered employment in fisheries and aquaculture. Fish and Fisheries (2010) 11: 405–420.
documents
Role of Women Senegal
Most research on gender difference or inequities in capture fisheries and aquaculture in Africa and the Asia-Pacific focuses on the gender division of labour. Emerging research on globalization, market changes, poverty and trends in gendered employment within this sector reveals the need to move beyond this narrow perspective. If gleaning and post-harvesting activities were enumerated, the fisheries and aquaculture sector might well turn out to be female sphere. A livelihoods approach better enables an understanding of how employment in this sector is embedded in other social, cultural, economic, political and ecological structures and processes that shape gender inequities and how these might be reduced. We focus on four thematic areas – markets and migration, capabilities and well-being, networks and identities, governance and rights – as analytical entry points. These also provide a framework to identify research gaps and generate a comparative understanding of the impact of development processes and socioecological changes, including issues of climate change, adaptation and resilience, on gendered employment. Without an adequate analysis of gender, fisheries management and development policies may have negative effects on people’s livelihoods, well-being and the environment they depend on, or fail altogether to achieve intended outcomes.
Australia/Oceania,Asia,Africa
Women,Rights,Markets,Livelihood,Governance,Gender,Fisheries,Aquaculture
5
No
252
Harper, Sarah, Dirk Zeller, Melissa Hauzer, Daniel Pauly and Ussif Rashid Sumaila. Women and fisheries: Contribution to food security and local economies. Marine Policy 39(2013) 56–63.
documents
Role of Women Pacific Island
The substantial role of women in fisheries is overlooked in management and policy. Fortunately, it is gaining recognition despite a lack of quantitative data describing the scale of participation and contribution. This work summarizes existing knowledge on women’s participation in marine fisheries globally, and estimates their contribution in the Pacific. While women’s role varies between geographic regions, in the Pacific, women account for 56% of annual small-scale catches, and resulting in an economic impact of 363 million USD (total revenue: 110 million USD). Recognizing and quantifying the role of women in fisheries has profound implications for management, poverty alleviation and development policy.
Oceania
Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Food Security
4
No
253
Sloan, Lindis (Editor). Women’s Participation in Decision-making Processes in Arctic Fisheries Resource Management. Arctic Council 2002-2004. Published by Forlaget Nora, Kvinneuniversitetet Nord, N-8286 Norfold, Norway.
documents
Role of Women Arctic Ocean
With fisheries in the Arctic as the area of research, the intent of this project was to do research on three levels of resource management. (1)Individual power – ownership and leadership in fisheries and fishery-related businesses, (2) Structural or Institutional power - influence in the systems and bodies that determine quota regulations and (3) Discursive power - the symbols, public images, assumptions and stereotypes that serve to uphold fisheries as a “male” domain. These are treated comparatively in an international study, involving subprojects in Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden and one initiated by the Norwegian Sami Parliament. The Faroe Islands have been included in the comparative part, but not in a separate project due to the timeframe. The studies and the resulting project report include comparative background descriptions of the fisheries and the gender equality situation for each country, and an overview of important decision-making bodies in fisheries management at different levels in the Arctic. In order to study the right and access to and control of resources, three main categories of information have been identified: individual, institutional and discursive power. The report includes information such as the percentage of women participants in, for instance, committees and decision-making bodies in the sector, and at the statistics for women in businesses, as leaders or owners in the sector, and as employees in fish processing companies and the aquaculture sector in the participating countries.
Arctic
Women,Quota,Participation,Institutions,Decision Making
5
No
254
Cheke, Abiodun Oritsejemine. Women in Fish Value Chain in Nigeria. IIFET 2012 Tanzania Proceedings.
documents
Role of Women Nigeria
Women in Nigeria play a key and vital role in the Fisheries value chain in Nigeria especially when we look at their involvement in the marine, artisanal and Aquaculture sub-sector of the Fisheries Sector. The women who constitute the greater percentage of the fish mongers/ processors represent the first segment of the fish market chain, buying fresh fish directly from the fishermen. The fish is either sold fresh by the women, or processed by smoking. In the aquaculture sector the women also play key roles in buying and processing. The women in the fisheries value chain are often grouped into Cooperatives Societies though we have a very, very few that go solo. However, the women’s activities in the value chain are characterized by low capital and technology input. Women’s work in fish value chain has not been optimized/ linked to value chain finance in Nigeria – thus they are limited to various financial services being put up by the commercial banks for the Agricultural Sector in the Country. This lack of Corporate finance has in essence debar the women from upgrading their fisheries activities and businesses in the various steps along the fisheries value chain and they have thus not been able to build sustainable and viable fish trade especially when it comes to the export of their fish and other fishery products.
Africa
Women,Value,Markets,Finance
4
No
255
Gurumayum, S.B., V.V. Sugunan and M.C. Nandeesha. The Ema Market of Manipur and the women fish vendors. Fishing Chimes 30 (2011): 1--&11, pp 72-75.
documents
Women in Fisheries India
A rapid survey of the women fish sellers at the ‘All Women Market of Manipur; was conducted during the month of January 20113. The study revealed some interesting and unique pursuits of women of Manipur. In Manipur, women play an important role not only in fish business but also in every aspect of life. Selling of commodities is women’s business. Three are about 302 fresh fish vendors but the numbers fluctuate from time to time as they sell according to demand and situation. If needed, they resort to selling smoked fish. However, some of them stick to their main business of selling only fresh, dry or other forms of treated fish, even if the situation demands otherwise. Unlike other parts of India, they do not share the hierarchic traditions in which women are seen as dependent and accepted in supportive role to men. In addition, the current political unrest and insurgency problems have displaced many of the males from productive activities
Asia
Gender,Markets,Women
3
No
256
Ruangsivakul, S. Recognising gender capability in promoting sustainable fisheries development and poverty alleviation in fishery communities. Fish for the People, 9 (2011): 40-43
documents
Women in Fisheries World
Gender is a concept that deals with the roles and relationships between women and men that are determined by social, political, cultural and economic contexts – not through biological aspects. Unequal power relationship between women and men in many cultures mean that women are disadvantaged in terms of their control over resources, access to services as well as in their ability to take advantage of new opportunities and in dealing with ongoing changes affecting their lives
General
Politics,Women,Gender
3
No
257
Biswas, N. Turning the tide: women’s lives in fisheries and the assault of capital. Economic and Political Weekly. Vol XLVI (2011): 53-60
documents
Women in Fisheries World
Over the years, research on women in the fisheries moved from a framework of political economy to a framework of political ecology. This meant that analyses shifted away from labour, production relations and surplus value extraction typically grounded in Marxian modes of analysis, in favour of those focused on environmental sustainability, livelihood sustainability and a discourse on poverty. During this period, women’s labour has been mobilized at an unprecedented scale and concentrated in the most exploitative jobs to fuel economic growth in fisheries. Even as industrial fisheries thrive on the labour of poor women, new analyses and new forms of organising are needed to fundamentally challenge this exploitation. Capital cannot be left unfettered to do as it pleases, but must be forced through stringent regulation to heed other considerations apart from profitability alone. Donor aid is, however, driving the non-governmental organisation increasingly towards conciliatory, mediatory roles, incapable of seeking solutions outside the framework of capital.
World,General
Sustainable Development,Women,NGO,Labor
4
No
258
Kronen, M and A. Vunisea, 2009. Fishing impact and food security – gender differnces in finfisheries across Pacific Island countries and cultural groups. SPC Women in /fisheries Information Bulletin # 19.
documents
Women in Fisheries Melanesia
The PROCFish regional socio-economic database includes gender-specific fishery data across 63 coastal communities in 17 Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). The 17 PICTs can further be separated by major cultural group, i.e. Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Fishery data is further specified by three different habitats as perceived by fishers, including sheltered coastal reef, lagoon and outer reef. This nested design is used to illuminate the major question: What are the commonalities and differences between fishermen and fisherwomen across all 17 PICTs, by cultural group, gender group and habitat fished? Earlier studies suggested that women’s contributions are substantive; confirmed in this study particularly for Melanesian communities. In addition, results indicated that fishermen are mainly responsible for the total annual catch of a community, most of which is sold on the local market to people not belonging to the fishermen’s community. The results therefore highlight the importance of targeting subsistence and commercial artisanal fishers, differences in gender contributions to both of these and differences between cultural groups
Oceania
Women,Subsistence Fisheries,Artisanal Fisheries,Gender
4
No
259
Satia, Ben. The programme for integrated development of artisanal fisheries in West Africa. NAGA, The ICLARM Quarterly, January 1995: pp9-11
documents
Women in Fisheries Angola
Marine artisanal fisheries plays an important role in the socio-economic life of many countries along the West African coast, from Mauritania to Angola. The Programme for Integrated Development of Artisanal Fisheries in West Africa (IDAF) was initiated in 1983 to help some 20 coastal states from Mauritania to Angola which wished to develop and manage their artisanal fisheries through participatory and integrated approaches as defined in the strategy adopted in 1994 at the World Fisheries Conference. The targeted direct beneficiaries are the staff of the department of Fisheries in the 20 countires, and associated projects and research institutions; while the ultimate beneficiaries are all persons involved in the artisanal fisheries subsector in the region. Phase III of the programme laid emphasis on identifying and disseminating elements and mechanisms that favour the sustainability of initiative sin fishing communities, the improvement of the competence of national fisheries development staff in development and management planning of artisanal fisheries, the promotion of responsible fishing; the devolution of major resource management and development decisions to the local community and the identification, development and implementation of strategies related to information and experience exchange in artisanal fisheries within the region.
Africa
Africa,Women,Fisheries,Artisanal Fisheries,Sustainable Development
4
No
260
Ahmed, Md. Kawser, Sadeka Halim and Shamima Sultana. Participation of Women in Aquaculture in Three Coastal Districts of Bangladesh: Approaches Toward Sustainable Livelihood. World Journal of Agricultural Sciences 8 (3): 253-268, 2012
documents
Women in Fisheries Bangladesh
Women’s contribution to small-scale aquaculture is often unrecognized and the real benefits from their involvement in activity are not objectively assessed. The present study focused on the women’s participation in Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA) assisted small scale aquaculture projects in three coastal Districts of Bangladesh. The findings reveal that in most projects women’s role is significant. Women have more knowledge in terms of the management of the production for example, scheduling, harvesting, feeding frequency, removal of unused feeds, etc. Women also have been found directly involved in preparation of cage and maintenance, identification of male and female prawn, procuring of good quality seed and stocking of fish. Women in some programs are also found to be selling fish on their own. Most of the women sell by the farm-gate, local bazaar and to the middlemen. The most important positive aspect of change is that now women participants’ family income has increased which is mostly used for food, health and education. Women’s participation in project, according to the findings, ensures certain extent of social and economic empowerment in the rural societies. The present fisheries project fails to take into account how the women participants are going to continue when projects are withdrawn. Women would like to be engaged in aquaculture after the project support is withdrawn though there is not much scope for savings which could be used as investment to continue their involvement. However, they expressed that they would like to sustain through NGO loan, local moneylender and petty personal savings.
Asia
Aquaculture,Women,Small Scale Fisheries,Sustainable Development,Livelihood
4
No
261
Madeleine Hall-Arber (2012), An Evaluation of the Roles of Women in Fishing Communities of Dakar, the Petite Cote, and Sine Saloum. Coastal Resources Center, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI, 26 pp
documents
Women in Fisheries Senegal
The women of the fishing communities of Senegal are central to the processing and trade of product landed by the country’s artisanal fleet, roles that have been critical to the fishing industry for many decades. Furthermore, the majority of women’s earnings are devoted to providing for their children, as well as contributing to their husband’s work. Nevertheless, until recently, women’s contributions to their families, communities and the fishing industry as a whole, have not been acknowledged. Consequently, women have been underrepresented in fisheries management and/or discussions of ways to improve the sustainability of the fishing industry. The practical necessities of providing for their children, with little or no help from their husbands, interferes with women’s ability to save or reinvest in their business. Lack of access to credit is a major constraint on both traders and processors. The traditional savings groups (naat) are insufficient to finance business expenses. Even where there are banks (mutuals), high interest rates, paperwork and/or the delay in obtaining funds often hampers their effectiveness. The need for funding is most acute when fish is scarce and prices higher.Basic infrastructure needs for processors, including access to clean water, basins to
ferment fish, tables to dry fish and ovens to smoke fish, shade, as well as lights for night work, storage facilities to prevent theft, and schools or childcare centers are in constant demand. Even in the cases where International NGOs have provided infrastructure facilities, these are all too frequently too small, inappropriately designed, or worse, started and left incomplete. At least a quarter of the communities visited had processing facilities that are unsatisfactory and at least two are unusable, resulting in crowding and very poor conditions.
Basic infrastructure for traders is less complicated: access to fresh water, ice, shade, basins or counters to display the fish, transportation and cold storage. Nevertheless, traders are rarely provided with help from NGOs, or even local government. In addition,
they face strong competition from men, including subsidized traders from other West
African countries. Other infrastructure desperately needed by the small sector of women who fish, that is, collect shellfish, includes gloves, water shoes, safety equipment such as life vests, and pirogues to reach the mangroves.
Many of the women recognize the characteristics and value of good leadership. Attributes include communication skills, knowledge (e.g., literacy), confidence, willingness to attend meetings and report to women at the group level. Typically, the processors are better organized than the traders. Workshops to teach literacy, accounting, proper handling of seafood, marketing, etc. are appreciated by the women and well attended when available. Product diversification and training in repurposing waste was also mentioned as potential workshop topics. A longer-term commitment to providing such skills and helping women retain them would clearly be beneficial. This could take the form of extension services, modeled on the U.S.’s Sea Grant Program. Such work could lead to empowerment and capacity building among the women in the fishing communities. A variety of research, outreach and educational activities are recommended.
Africa
Women,Artisanal Fisheries,Credit,Infrastructure
4
No
262
Worldfish, Gender and fisheries: Do women support, complement or subsidize men’s small-scale fishing activities? Issues Brief 2108, WorldFish Center
documents
Women in Fisheries World
The fisheries sector has long been considered a male domain, signifying a sense of adventure and risk valued by men but from which women are often excluded. However,
women’s engagement in small-scale capture fisheries related activities, including pre- and post-harvesting work, is estimated at 46% in nine major fish producing countries. Gender disparities in fisheries can result in lower labor productivity within the sector and inefficient allocation of labor at household and national levels. Addressing gender inequities by improving women’s incomes and educational levels, as well as their access
to information and decision making processes, improves human capabilities of the household, as well as society in general. At the WorldFish Center, research on gender and fisheries currently focuses on: 1. Markets, trade and migration, 2. Capabilities and well-being, 3. Identities and networks, 4. Governance and rights, and 5. Climate change, disasters and resilience
General
Gender,Markets,well being,Governance,Rights,Climate Change,Disaster
4
No
263
Khim, Kaing and Heng Ponley. Lessons learnt and Experience of Gender Mainstreaming policy and Strategy in the Fisheries Sector in Cambodia. A power point presentation made at the 9thAsian Fisheries & Aquaculture Forum, 21-25 April 2011, Shanghai, China
documents
Women in Fisheries Cambodia
The presentation focuses on the reason for Gender Mainstreaming Policy and Strategy in Fisheries Sector (GMPSF) in Cambodia, the Policy’s Statement and objectives of GMPSF, procedures for implantation, achievements and what have been changed and learnt. Some of the conclusions from the implementation process are that it is very important to create gender awareness among management team and staff at all levels to understand gender basic concept and issues in order to avoid misunderstanding of gender. Coordination team of gender mainstreaming should be from those who understand and have influence on it. Integrated gender indicators and actions in all sub-sectors of fisheries have to be from the starting point of annual plan, mid-term and long-term plans’ preparation. As gender is a complex and controversial subject, so time is need to disseminate, coordinate and follow up regularly by a gender focal point within the organization, projects and programs. Capacity building, through in-door/out-door trainings and learning by doing, is necessary and important for women empowerment both national and community levels in order to overcome gender inequality. Income generating activities (alternative livelihoods) are very important and necessary to provide the incentive inputs and benefits for high and active participation of both women and men at Community Fisheries/fishing village levels for sustainable fisheries resources management.
Asia
Women,Gender,Policy,Capacity Building
3
No
264
Navy, Hap and Wolf Hartmann. Making ‘gender in fisheries’ stick: A strategic partnership of networks in the Lower Mekong Basin. A power point presentation at the 8th Asian Fisheries Forum 2nd Global Symposium on “Gender and Fisheries: Solutions through Gender Research” 21 November 2007, Kochi, India
documents
Women in Fisheries Vietnam
The presentation focused on the importance of research and communication for sustainable development and referred to networks as a promising form for knowledge creation and dissemination. The aim is to link policy, information to action. There are different kinds of networks (open, development). The strategies have to be regionally coordinated and nationally implemented. The life and synergies of each network varies.
Asia
Mekong Delta,Gender,Fisheries
3
No
265
Khim, Kiang. Training Manual on Gender Awareness and Gender Mainstreaming in Fisheries Sector. Fisheries Administration, Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries, Kingdom of Cambodia, 2010
books
Women in Fisheries Cambodia
This training program is designed for the purpose of providing awareness of basic
gender concepts and gender mainstreaming in fisheries sector to key officers of FiA at national, provincial and local levels. Their knowledge of gender equality issues, gender analysis and gender mainstreaming is critical so that they can plan downstream training and other fisheries development programs to make sure that gender equality concerns are reviewed and mainstreamed into planning, implementation and monitoring of fisheries program. This target group of each training consists of approximately 15-25 key staff and who are responsible for field work and routinely train fisheries teams and members of Community Fisheries, fish farmers at provincial and local levels. Hence, it is both required and very useful for them to understand general principles of gender equality, as well as to apply gender analysis and gender mainstreaming in their training and day to day work. It is especially important for them to have this knowledge so that they can contribute to the achievement of implementation of the Gender mainstreaming Policy and Strategy in Fisheries.
Asia
Training,Gender,Fisheries
4
No
266
Sithirith, Mak. Women in Fisheries in Cambodia: A Case Study in Kampong Phluk in Tonle Sap Lake. December 2008.
documents
Women in Fisheries Cambodia
Kampong Phluk is a small fishing community on the eastern side of the Lake Tonle Sap. Fishing has been the important source of livelihoods for many generations and it is primary occupation of people living in this community. This study was to understand the fisheries and the impacts on women. “Wealth ranking” of households from each village was done. Among three villages—Thnoat Kambot, Kok Kdol and Dei Kroham, Thnoat Kambot was selected for further study of the women engagement in fisheries. The conclusion of this study is that the decline in household fish catch has put the burden on women than anybody else. While fish catch is decline, the fisher woman or fisherman find fewer alternatives for their living and they do not really know what to do to cope with this situation. The burden is higher on the women. The recommendations are: Empowering woman needs to be continued, but the empowerment should not go alone; it means that advocacy to protect the rights of fisher woman or fisherman
needs to a long with the livelihood support projects as fisher woman or man has been facing the decline in fisheries; Organizing a fisher woman network in the country level so that the fish woman could make their voice heard. At community level, woman group such as saving group could acts as a tool to mobilize woman participation in fisheries management as woman is good in fish trade. By saving group, it provides opportunity for fisher woman to act together to protect their rights.
Asia
Women,Fisheries,Credit,Trade
4
No
267
IRIS Consulting and Greenwich Maritime Institute. Women in Fisheries, Stage 1 Report. – summary progress report on the literature review. 2010
documents
Women in Fisheries England
This paper is intended to demonstrate the progress of our on-going project. The core aims of the project Women in Fisheries project are to offer a basis for identifying how equality of opportunity for women can be achieved within the industry and in influencing its future regulation. Key elements of this are the role of women in improving the economic efficiency of businesses, their contribution to the social fabric and sustainability of the fisheries and the coastal communities as well as their interaction with management authorities or organisations at the local, national and EU levels. The project is intended to provide a basis for creating and fostering networks and opportunities for exchanging experience and best practice. The proposal that led to this study is based on a hypothesis that women’s role and contributions to the fishing industry in England, as in other parts of the world, are under-recognised, nearly invisible in many cases, and that action is needed to address this.
Europe
Women,Fisheries
3
No
268
Arenos, M.C. and A. Lentisco. Mainstreaming gender into project cycle management in the fisheries sector. A field handbook. Regional Fisheries Livelihood Programme for south and southeast Asia. FAO ROAP, Bangkok, 2011.
books
http://www.rflp.org/mainstreaming_gender/
Women in Fisheries Asia
Women play a significant role in fisheries, yet lack of attention to gender roles and relations can result in policies or programmes failing to improve livelihoods or reduce vulnerability of fishing communities. The largely ‘invisible’ role of women in small-scale fisheries must be addressed if actions aimed at improving the livelihoods of small-scale fishers and their families are to be successful. As part of its efforts to promote gender equity to improve fisheries livelihoods, the Regional Fisheries Livelihoods Programme for South and Southeast Asia (RFLP) has developed a field handbook that gives guidance on taking gender into account in all phases of small-scale fisheries development projects. The handbook provides: An overview of the rationale, concepts and approaches concerning mainstreaming gender equality in development cooperation;
An overview of the role of women in the fisheries sector, the problems they face and possible empowerment opportunities; Tools for gender analysis in fisheries development projects and guidance on how to integrate gender aspects at various stages in the project cycle.
Asia
Women,Gender,Projects
5
No
269
Sultana, P., P.M. Thompson and M. Ahmed. Women-led fisheries management – A case study from Bangladesh. WorldFish Center.
documents
http://www.worldfishcenter.org/Pubs/Wif/wifglobal/wifg_asia_bangladesh_study.pdf
Women in Fisheries Bangladesh
Although women constitute 50% of the total population of Bangladesh, only 18% are economically involved in the total labor force. They are involved in diversified work within their homesteads. However, during times of family needs and economic crisis, women are involved in non-traditional jobs. In the fisheries sector, Muslim women are traditionally not involved in fishing but they are involved in fish drying and salting. In the Hindu dominated areas such as Goakhola-Hatiara, women are involved in fish catch as well as the collection of other aquatic resources as one of their livelihood strategies. Women and subsistence fishers are taking the lead in managing a common capture fishery resource in Goakhola-Hatiara with the support from an NGO for perhaps the first time in Bangladesh. However, the role of women in the Beel Management Committee is not well defined. Under the leadership of women the socio-economic conditions have changed and the social capital has increased.
Asia
Women,Fisheries,Livelihood
4
No
270
Workshop on Best practices for Gender Mainstreaming in the Fisheries Sector Siem Reap, Cambodia 2‐5 November 2010. Workshop Report. . Regional Fisheries Livelihood Programme for south and southeast Asia
Women in Fisheries Asia
The main purpose of the workshop was to create a platform for sharing knowledge on the theme of gender and fisheries, and to identify the tools to be used by project staff to best integrate gender needs into SSF projects. The objectives of the workshop were to:
Identify lessons learned and factors contributing to the success and failures of applying a gender perspective in SSF development projects and explore the reasons why efforts to date have or have not contributed in achieving gender equality; Discuss the different gender analytic tools used in the fisheries sector and determine the best practices that can be applied at field level; Contribute to the regional sharing of knowledge on the theme of gender and fisheries. The outputs of the workshop were: A set of “best tools” and “best practices” for gender mainstreaming in the fisheries sector at field level. Provide policy recommendations to be brought to the attention of FAO Fisheries and
Aquaculture Department, the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) and Regional Fisheries bodies such as the Asia Pacific Fisheries Commission (APFIC), as well as the Gender Networks in Fisheries.
Asia
Women,Gender,Fisheries,Small Scale Fisheries
4
No
271
Onyango, Paul Ochien’g and Svein Jentoft. Climbing the Hill: Poverty Alleviation, Gender Relationships, and Women’s Social Entrepreneurship in Lake Victoria, Tanzania. MAST 2011, 10(2): 117-140
documents
Women in Fisheries Tanzania
This paper tells the story of how a group of women in a Lake Victoria fishing community in Tanzania addressed the poverty status of their community through their agency and social entrepreneurship and, by doing so, also their subordination relative to men. Their efforts to improve their situation in the community landed them in men’s traditional space. In order to occupy that space without stirring antagonism, it was crucial that the women apply their practical, cultural, and relational skills in a way that did not jeopardize men’s cultural roles and sense of worth. The paper argues that women’s entrepreneurship is circumscribed by social relationships that do not work in their favour. Thus, to become change agents in an economic sense, they also need to be change agents in a social relational sense. The paper also illustrates how Aristotle’s concept of phronesis – practical wisdom or prudence – is useful for understanding what poverty alleviation and social entrepreneurship require
Africa
Lake Fisheries,Lake Victoria,Women,Poverty
4
No
272
Mishra, Yamini and Navanita Sinha. Gender Responsive Budgeting in India. What Has Gone Wrong? Economic & Political Weekly, Vol XLVII no 17, April 28, 2012.
documents
Women in Fisheries India
he manner in which the Indian initiative on gender responsive budgeting has panned out appears to be a classic case of putting the cart before the horse. This article analyses the two prime strategies adopted by the Government of India for institutionalising GRB, namely, the “Gender Budget Statement” and Gender Budgeting Cells to highlight what has gone wrong, and what needs to be fixed. The authors also draw on experiences from other countries, to argue that GRB in India needs a completely different rhythm if it has to translate into better outcomes for the women of our country. With the formulation of the Twelfth Plan under way, the moment is opportune to push for ground-breaking changes in the policy discourse on GRB.
Asia
Women,Fisheries,Finance
4
No
273
Tuara, Patricia and Kelvin Passfield. Issues on gender in oceanic and coastal fisheries science and management in the Pacific Islands: case studies from Solomon Islands, Marshall Islands and Tonga. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin #22 – July 2012
documents
Women in Fisheries Marshall Islands
The purpose of this study is to benchmark the current situation with regard to women’s participation in the science and management of oceanic and coastal fisheries in the Pacific region, and to make recommendations on how it might be made more equitable. The study was commissioned for the SciCOFish Project (Scientific support for management of coastal and oceanic fisheries in the Pacific Islands) funded by the tenth European Development Fund.
To gain an overview of the participation of women in fisheries science and management in the Pacific Islands, case studies were undertaken in three countries: Solomon Islands (Melanesia), Marshall Islands (Micronesia), and Tonga (Polynesia). In each country a gender analysis was completed for the fisheries science and management sector. The quantitative and qualitative information on the current situation, including identification of barriers to participation, is the basis for the recommendations for Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) support.
As expected, the study showed that there are more men than women employed in the fisheries science and management sector. The case studies in Solomon Islands, Tonga and Marshall Islands show that women comprise 18% of the total number of staff working in this sector in government fisheries, environmental institutions and environmental non-governmental organisations (NGOs).
If fishing vessel observers (work that is always likely to be heavily dominated by men) are removed from the calculation, women’s participation increases to 25% of the total. In contrast, the percentage of women employed in administrative and clerical roles in government fisheries departments exceeds 60%.
Oceania
Women,Fisheries,Participation
4
No
274
Kodoth, Praveena and V J Varghese. Protecting Women or Endangering the Emigration Process Emigrant Women Domestic Workers, Gender and State Policy. Economic & Political Weekly. Vol XLVII, no 43 October 27, 2012.
documents
Women in Fisheries India
The paper discusses the case of emigrant women domestic workers from Kerala, a state which has had a long history of migration of workers in this segment. It draws attention to the critical failure of the social science scholarship to address the question of poor women migrants. It also provides an overview of state policy on migration and underlines its complicity in generating regulatory gaps. The paper engages with the gendering of citizenship and sovereignty through a comparison of the state policy on migrant women workers and the experience of three segments of this workforce – migrant nurses, domestic workers and outmigrant fish-processing workers. It then considers the question of agency in the context of women workers who are thrust into the position of breadwinners for their families, and finally, the question of responsible state intervention.
Asia
Fish Processing,Women,Migrants
4
No
275
Novaczek, Irene. The seaweed harvesters of Alao. SAMUDRA, Issue #47. 2007
documents
Women in Fisheries Chile
While archaeological evidence confirms that inhabitants of the Chiloe archipelago used sea plants for food and medicine, today’s islanders sell off all the harvest. A fun workshop brings back to the island its ancient practices
Latin America
Islands,Women,Traditional Knowledge,Traditional Practice
4
No
276
Hilly,Zelda Anne-Maree Schwarz and Delvene Boso. Strengthening the role of women in community-based marine resource management: lessons learned from community workshops. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin #22 – July 2012
documents
Women and Resources Management,Women in Fisheries Solomon Islands
Community-based resource management (CBRM) forms an important component of the Solomon Islands Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) inshore fisheries strategy. Women play important but often undervalued roles in fishing-dependent families and communities in Solomon Islands. They collect, process, prepare and market fish and other marine resources, contributing directly to the well-being of their families and communities. Here we outline the process that has been undertaken to strengthen the CBRM role that women can play in several Solomon Islands communities in three provinces. We highlight key components of the training from which we have identified lessons learned. These are intended to inform the ongoing work of improving gender equity in community-based management.
Oceania
Women,Resources Management,Community Based Management,Equity
4
No
277
UNGA, Report submitted by the Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter. Human Rights Council, Twenty-second session, Agenda item 3, Promotion and protection of all human rights, civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to development
documents
Women in Fisheries World
In the present report, submitted to the Human Rights Council in accordance with
Council resolution 13/4, the Special Rapporteur on the right to food discusses the threats to women's right to food, identifying the areas that demand the most urgent attention. The report examines successively the obstacles women face in access to employment, social protection and the productive resources needed for food production, food processing and value chain development. It ends with a recommendation to States to effectively respond to women and girls’ needs and priorities in their food security strategies and to relieve women’s unpaid work burden in the household, while at the same time address the specific constraints women face and transforming the existing gendered division of roles.
World
Women,Food Security
4
No
278
Choo, Poh Sze. The sea cucumber fishery in Semporna, Sabah, Malaysia. SPC Beche-de-mer Information Bulletin #32, pp 43-48 – March 2012
documents
Women in Fisheries Malaysia
Coastal communities in Southeast Asia have a long history of fishing for sea cucumbers. This study describes the sea cucumber fishery in Semporna, Sabah, Malaysia and examines the size and sustainability of the fishery. Information on fishing methods, time of fishing, species and amount caught, earnings derived from the fishery, and downstream activities were documented. Information was gathered through 1) interviews using a structured questionnaire, 2) informal observations in the fishing villages visited, and 3) conversations with fishers. In total, 51 fishers were interviewed. Fishers who collect sea cucumbers in Semporna belong to either the Bajau Tempatan or Bajau Laut communities. Most of the fishers are men who mainly fish at night either alone, with friends or with family members (usually their sons). A small number of fishers in Denawan and Nusa Tengah fish with their wives and daughters. In areas where
sea cucumbers are still found on shallow reef flats (e.g. Nusa Tengah), women and children frequently glean for sea cucumbers during low tide.
Asia
sea cucumber,Women
4
No
279
United Nations Development Programme. 2012. San Crisanto Foundation, Mexico. Equator Initiative Case Study Series. New York, NY
documents
Women in Fisheries Mexico
The San Crisanto Foundation focuses on mangrove restoration and flood prevention in a region that consistently faces heavy rainfall and flooding. Since the Foundation’s establishment, over 11,300 metres of canals have been restored, and 45 cenotes have been delisted and rehabilitated. As a result, flood risk is reduced and populations and diversity of endemic wildlife in the cenotes and mangrove forests have increased. Restoration efforts have generated 60 jobs and local household incomes have increased substantially. To complement to its restoration efforts, the Foundation undertakes community education and awareness-raising, emphasising the value of wetland and mangrove conservation for local livelihoods and as a natural buffer against floods
Central America
Women,Fisheries,Mangroves
4
No
280
Gopal, Nikita, Arathy Ashok, Jeyanthi, P., Gopal, T. K. S. and Meenakumari, B. (Eds.), 2012, Gender in Fisheries : A Future Roadmap, Workshop Report, Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, Cochin, 38p.
documents
Women in Fisheries India
The Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, Cochin has been carrying out research in
developing appropriate technologies, building capacities and assessing impacts of
interventions for the benefit of the fisheries sector, including for fisherwomen. A one day workshop on 'Gender in Fisheries: A Future Roadmap' was organized on 4 April 2012, at CIFT. The aim of the workshop was to bring into perspective the issues in the area of ‘Gender in Fisheries’, especially from the point of view of the future work in this direction.
Asia
Women,Fisheries
4
No
281
Quist, Cornelie (ed), Katia Frangoudes and Brian O’Riordan. Strengthening the voice of women of fishing communities in Europe. A Report in “Recasting the net: defining a gender agenda for sustaining life and livelihoods in fisheries and aquaculture”. ICSF-AKTEA Questionnaire and Workshop 2010.
documents
Women in Fisheries European Union
The ICSF Belgium Office and Aktea, the European Network of Women’s Organizations in
Fisheries and Aquaculture, hosted a one-day workshop to prepare for ICSF’s international Women in Fisheries workshop, which took place on February 13, 2010. In this report, the reports of information provided by the participants of the ICSF-AKTEA project 2010 through the questionnaires and workshop are presented by country to respect the diversity of contexts within Europe. This is preceded by an attempt to present a synthesis of shared priority issues and strategies of women’s organizations in fisheries in Europe, taking stock of achievements and obstacles.
Europe
Women,Fisheries,Organizations
5
No
282
Resurreccion, Bernadette P. Mainstreaming gender in community fisheries in the Tonle Sap: Three Myths. In Kummu, M., Keskinen, M. & Varis, O. (eds.): Modern Myths of the Mekong, pp. 65-77. Water & Development Publications - Helsinki University of Technology
documents
Women in Fisheries Cambodia
Gender mainstreaming is a policy-driven process of integrating gender concerns into development structures and practices. Particular ways of thinking (‘myths’) underpin gender mainstreaming and this will be demonstrated in community fisheries in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap region. Involving women may inadvertently overlook women’s disproportionate share of caring responsibilities and the traditional male terrain of fishery management. In short, these myths in gender mainstreaming may mainstream women into community fisheries to advance goals of fishery protection, but may fail to redress gender inequality and social inequities in the first place, thus resulting in more counterproductive effects than positive ones
Asia
Gender,Tonle Sap,Mekong Delta,Community Based Management,Social Issues,Socio-economic Aspects
4
No
283
United Nations Development Programme. 2012. Pescado Azul Women’s Association of Isabela, Ecuador. Equator Initiative Case Study Series. New York, NY.
documents
Women in Fisheries Ecuador
This women’s cooperative is providing livelihood options for the women and men of the island of Isabela in the Galápagos Islands. This small-scale enterprise is simultaneously decreasing pressures on overexploited local fisheries by adding value, rather than scale, to its production of smoked fish. Fishermen in the region have traditionally relied on declining populations of coastal sea cucumber, lobster, and shark for their livelihoods. Asociación de Mujeres de Isabela provides an alternative by creating a market for sustainably-sourced tuna, which is processed, smoked, and sold to tourists. Additionally, the Pescado Azul initiative contributes to the conservation of the Galápagos Islands’ unique and endemic biodiversity by using guava wood, a destructive invasive species, to smoke the fish.
Latin America
Women,Galapagos,Fisheries,Cooperative
4
No
284
Gopalakrishnan, A. Role of women in Indian shrimp farming. Naga, the ICLARM Quarterly, pp16-18, Oct 1996
documents
Women in Fisheries,Role of Women in Aquaculture India
Although women in India are not conspicuous in the formal industrial sector, their role in traditional coastal shrimp farming is quite significant. In recent years, shrimp farming has expanded fast, particularly in the maritime districts of Tamil Nadu, The rapid development of this industry has provided employment opportunities for women, particularly fisher women and they are now able to contribute to household income. They are involved in various facets of shrimp farming, including pond construction, seed collection, collection of feed materials and preparation of feeds, pond maintenance and post harvest handling. This study indicates that about 40% of the laborers involved in shrimp farm construction are women. The various roles of rural women in shrimp farming are also described.
Asia
Women,Shrimp,Labour,Employment,Aquaculture
4
No
285
Lal, Anir and Veikila Vuki. The historical development of seaweed farming, including roles of men and women, and prospects for its future development in Fiji. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin #21, pp11-16, December 2010.
documents
Community based management,Women and Resources Management Fiji
Seaweed farming in Fiji has become very popular because it requires low level of technology and investment and gets considerable government support. This report presents an overview of and assesses the historical development of seaweed farming in Fiji since 1976. Particular reference is given to Kappaphycus alvarezii as it has dominated the Fiji seaweed industry. Statistics were limited in some areas, especially after 1988; nevertheless, through interviews, surveys and literature review, information on the seaweed industry in Fiji was gathered and assessed. Women play an important role in both farming and processing – in the selection of planting material, preparing lines and harvesting. Problems faced by the farmers including loss of crops during cyclones and marketing of seaweed.
Oceania
Women,Seaweed
4
No
286
Kronen, M., A. Meloti, B. Ponia, T. Pickering, S. Diake, J. Kama, P. Kenilolerie, J. Ngwaerobo and A. Teitelbaum. Gender and seaweed farming on Wagina Island, Choiseul Province in Solomon Islands. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin #21, pp3-10, December 2010.
documents
Role of Women in Aquaculture,Women and Resources Management Solomon Islands
A field survey on socio-economic dimensions of seaweed farming was carried out on Wagina Island, Choiseul province in Solomon Islands. Given the geographical and socio-economic conditions, seaweed farming on Wagina was found to be a viable, non-gender based income option, with women having equal chances to benefit from the cash revenues sourced from this aquaculture. Results from a survey of 58 households (28% of all households), 40 of which were engaged in seaweed farming, showed that (a) the average annual cash income for seaweed farming households was about 52% higher than non seaweed farming households; (b) members, particularly men, of more than half of all households surveyed have either abandoned or reduced their finfishign and beche-de-mer (and trochus) fishing; (c) 38% of all respondents believe that seaweed has improved social networking and social services in the community. Seaweeed farming was found to be essentially a family enterprise though men accounted for most (68%) annual labour) of the annual labour input. Women and men contribute similar amounts of labour to most processes in seaweed production. A positive and statistically significant correlation was found between the number of women per household participating in seaweed farming and the household’s revenues from this income source. A number of issues, including women’s roles as mothers and child educators, and certain environmental, financial and managerial problems, are highlighted and need to be addressed, to assess future sustainability of seaweed farming on Wagina, and possibly in other communities in Solomon Islands
Oceania
Seaweed,Aquaculture,Women
4
No
287
AKTEA, Agenda for research on women in fisheries and aquaculture in Europe, 2005.
documents
Role of Women in Aquaculture,Women and Resources Management,Women in Fisheries European Union
This publication gives the research agenda of the programme ‘FEMMES’ financed by the 5th Framework Programme for Research of the European Commission. This has been done to raise the needs of research about the place of women in the fishing and aquaculture sector. This agenda is directed towards decision-makers for research policy at all levels, local, national and European. The agenda items are listed under five themes: Women in economic activities, legal recognition of informal women’s participation in economic activities, women and collective action, women’s role in the social reproduction of coastal communities and their cultures and theoretical and methodological approaches.
Europe
Women,Research and Development,Fisheries,Aquaculture
4
No
288
Sahoo, P.K., H.K. Dash, B.N. Sadangi and A.K. Mishra. Carp Fry production as an economic activity for rural women. Technical Bulletin 12. Directorate of Research on Women in Agriculture (ICAR), Bhubaneshwar, Orissa, India. 2009.
books
Role of Women in Aquaculture,Women in Fisheries India
Recognising the potential of aquaculture in bringing techno-economic empowerment of rural women in coastal tracts of Orissa, the Directorate of Research on Women in Agriculture (DRWA), Bhubaneswar, has taken up several initiatives to empower the rural women with different aquaculture technologies. The model described in this publication is an outcome of a participatory action research with 12 villages in Orissa taking into consideration constraints generally experienced by women in the implementation of the technology. A suitable strategy for nursery production of Indian major carps namely catla, rohu and mrigal is described.
Asia
Aquaculture,Inland Fisheries,Orissa,Women
4
No
289
Chamnan, C., S.H. Thislted, B. Roitana, L. Sopha, R.V. Gerpacio and N. Roos. The role of fisheries resources in rural Cambodia: Combating micronutrient deficiencies in women and children. Department of Fisheries Post-Harvest Technologies and Quality Control, Fisheries Administration, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Cambodia, 106p.
books
Status of Women,Women in Fisheries Cambodia
This book has reported the findings from a three year Danida funded project on the Role of Fish in Food and Nutrition Security in Developing Countries: Focus on Combating Micronutrient deficiencies. In this book, the results from four milestone studies include household socio-economics, food consumption, fish nutrient concerns, and rural fish markets studies have been described and discussed.
Asia
Women,Nutrition,Socio-economic Aspects,Fish Marketing
4
No
290
Keijser, C. The role of microfinance in the empowerment of women. The case of the Pudupattinam fishermen village in Tamil Nadu, India. Bachelor Thesis, University of Amsterdam, 2011
documents
Role of Women,Women in Fisheries India
This paper begins by examining some of the theories on microfinance and its potential to bring about empowerment. Drawing on the case of the fishermen village Pudupattinam (Tamil Nadu, India), the paper looks at what evidence is known about the impact of microfinance (provided by a local NGO) on women’s life, in terms of empowerment both at the household level and within the community. It argues that, while acknowledging that the last decade, and particularly in the aftermath of the tsunami laid grounds for a changing society in which the roles of women have slowly started to expand, it is because of the microcredit scheme that women now have access to employment opportunities. In this study it is argued that while the programme has contributed to the empowerment of women as individuals (more welfare, increased self-reliance and self-esteem, more bargaining power and overall reduction in unequal power structures at the household level), the contribution to empowering women within the community has been modest, due to social and cultural norms that continue to confine women’s economic activities to the domestic sphere.
Asia
Women,Microfinance,Empowerment
4
No
291
Kaptein, Z. The implications of time zoning in fisheries for the livelihoods of fish vendor women in Chennai, India. University of Amsterdam
documents
Women in Fisheries India
The study focuses on the direct and indirect effects of the 45 days of the closed season in Chennai in Tamil Nadu on the way the fish vendor women can conduct their business and what strategies they use to manage their livelihood and that of their family to survive this period. The study examined the societal position of a fisher woman in India, the effect of the fishing ban on the fish vendor women’s livelihoods and the strategies used by the fish vendor women to manage their livelihoods
Asia
Women,Livelihood,Closed seasons
4
No
292
Shanthi, B, M. Krishnan and V.S. Chandrasekaran. Socio-economic and gender analysis in aquaculture. CIBA special publication. 2010.
books
Role of Women,Role of Women in Aquaculture,Women and Resources Management India
A number of studies have been conducted on the differential impacts of aquaculture on various social groups in India. These studies indicate that women’s participation and contribution to the aquaculture sector is appreciable. But analysis which brings about gender issues, social impacts, access to resources by men and women, community participation as a whole and the support given to the women, is scanty. This study attempts to address these gaps. The approach used is based on the SEAGA programme. The ultimate purpose of the study is to support gender participatory planning of aquaculture, and to integrate socio-economic and gender issues in the community development process.
Asia
Aquaculture,Women,Socio-economic Aspects,Gender
4
No
293
Viswanath, Rosemary and Surabhi Singh (Eds.) Tracing the Maze: A dossier on women and tourism. Equations, July 2011.
documents
Role of Women India
While tourism does provide an opportunity for women, it is worthwhile to examine whether the achievements are initiated by women as agents of their lives and future in an aspirational way, or imposed on them because they are forced to embrace them as survival strategies. Also creating opportunity is not enough to achieve empowerment in its true spirit unless it also entails breaking gendered power structures and enabling participation as equal partners. Therefore, it becomes imperative to examine the nature of women’s participation, their role in influencing decisions around tourism, and the extent to which they have been able to break boundaries. With this view, the dossier examines a range of issues from tourism process to its outcome. The dossier is in three parts looking at women and tourism policy, tourism and gender relations and women’s engagement with tourism – issues and concerns. There is an annexure with additional documents.
Asia
Tourism,Women
4
No
294
Gandhimati (Ed.), Voices of the Marginalized – a success story of Karaikal federation. Sneha, 2008.
documents
Role of Women,Women in Fisheries India
Karaikal District Fisher women Federation was facilitiated to bring into its fold the members of all sangams. Federations are the Community Based Organizations that have emerged as the formalized institutional mechanisms to facilitate women’s political participation and move towards gender equality in all spheres of their lives. It has become the fall back structure for women in distress, especially single women. Its members are sharing the journey of the federation towards their ideological and economic empowerment. Federation enables fisher women to address their problems from micro level to macro level. In this publication we have documented the history, achievements and challenges of the federation in the form of case studies based on discussions with women.
Asia
Women,Fishing Communities,Cooperative,Politics,Participation
4
No
295
Wilson, Diane. An Unreasonable Woman: A true story of shrimpers, politicos, polluters and the fight for Seadrift, Texas. Chelsea Green Publishing Company, Vermont, USA, 2005, pp391.
books
Struggles and Movements,Women in Fisheries United States
When Diane Wilson, fourth-generation shrimp-boat captain and mother of five, learns that she lives in the most polluted county in the United States, she decides to fight back. She launches a campaign against a multibillion-dollar corporation that has been covering up spills, silencing workers, flouting the EPA, and dumping lethal ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride into the bays along her beloved Texas Gulf Coast. In an epic tale of bravery, Wilson takes her fight to the courts, to the gates of the chemical plant, and to the halls of power in Austin. Along the way she meets with scorn, bribery, character assassination, and death threats. Finally Wilson realizes that she must break the law to win justice: She resorts to nonviolent disobedience, direct action, and hunger strikes.
N. America
Shrimp,Pollution,Politics
5
No
296
Nwabeze, G.O. P.I. Ifejika, A.A. Tafida, J.O. Ayanda, A.P. Erie and N.E. Belonwu. Gender and Fisheries of Lake Kainji, Nigeria: A Review. Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science 8 (1): 9-13, 2013. DOl: 1O.3923/jfas.2013.9.13
documents
Women in Fisheries Nigeria
The paper examined gender and fisheries of lake Kainji, Nigeria. The study highlights
socio-economic characteristics of women involved in Kainji lake fisheries, important issues about gender and fisheries. It reveals that the categories of women in the Kainji lake fisheries are in the middle age of 31-40 years with very low educational background. It also indicates that fish processing has been the most prominent activity of women in fisheries of lake Kainji and constitute about 60% of the women. The study concludes that women play significant roles in all aspects of fisheries in lake Kainji. Importantly, women's roles span reproduction and production.
Africa
Women,Gender,Lake Fisheries,Socio-economic Aspects
4
No
297
Döring, Ralf, Natacha Carvalho and Jarno Virtanen (Eds.) Economic Performance of the EU Fish Processing Industry Sector (STECF-OWP-12-01). © European Union, 2012.
documents
Women in Fisheries European Union
The 2011 Annual Economic Report (AER) on the European Union (EU) fish processing industry provides a comprehensive overview of the latest information available on the sector’s structure and economic performance. The report has been produced by fisheries economists from the JRC and a group of economic experts convened under the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF). In 2009, the fish processing sector in the EU comprised over 3,500 enterprises with fish processing as main activity, accounting for about €25.5 thousand million of turnover and more than €6 thousand million of Gross Added Value (GVA). The fish processing industry employed around 150 thousand people in the whole of Europe. The fish processing industry revealed improvement in terms of turnover in 2009 when compared to 2008, despite the global and sectorial situations. Even after the start of the global financial crisis many countries reported increases in several socioeconomic indicators in 2008, including turnover, net profit and employment. Additionally, and at a first glance at 2010/11, many experts report a better situation than in 2008/9. Overall the sector is suffering from very low margins, which continue to decrease owing essentially to increases in raw materials and energy costs that cannot be translated into price increases due to the retail sector’s high negotiation power. The fish processing enterprises in many Member States seem to be more efficient in reacting to increasing costs than in previous years. In several countries the expectations are positive indicating that total assets are higher than debt. The report also gives statistics about employment and activities of women in this sector.
Europe
Women,PHF,Fisheries,Employment
3
No
298
Peke, Shuddhawati. Women Fish Vendors in Mumbai: A Study Report. International Collective in Support of Fishworkers, 2013.
documents
Women in Fisheries India
Since its inception in 1993, the Women in Fisheries programme of the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF) has been highlighting the vital role of women in fisheries. This study, “Women Fish Vendors in Mumbai”, aims to provide insights into the challenges faced by women fish vendors in the city of Mumbai (formerly Bombay). Traditionally, women have been entrusted with the roles of housekeeping, reproductive activities, caregiving, maintaining social cohesion in the community, and supplementing the family’s income by working inside or outside fisheries. However, their work is rarely seen as productive and its value is discounted. A lack of women’s participation in decision-making bodies within communities, fisheries organizations and government has resulted in a general neglect of their interests. This has led to a constant demand by women’s-rights activists and organizations to address market-related issues of women vendors. Towards this end, a need to better understand these issues was recognized at the workshop on “Enhancing Women’s Role in Fisheries” that was organized by ICSF in 2010. This study hopes to fill some of the gaps in understanding the issue of women in fisheries.
Asia
Women,Vendors,Participation,Decision Making
5
No
299
Britton, E. Women as agents of wellbeing in Northern Ireland’s fishing households. Maritime Studies 2012, 11:16 http://www.maritimestudiesjournal.com/content/11/1/16
documents
Women in Fisheries Ireland
This paper focuses on the gender dimensions of wellbeing in fishing households in
Northern Ireland. The impact of change in the fishing industry on women’s wellbeing is outlined and linkages are made between changing access to fish and changing roles of women in fishing households. The paper explores what this change means for how women perceive and pursue their wellbeing needs and aspirations and how they negotiate their needs with the needs of the household. In an occupation as gender biased as fishing it is argued that in order for fisheries management and policy to be successful, a profile of what really matters to people is important. In particular, the paper highlights how such priorities link to the complex and dynamic role of women in fishing households.
Europe
Women,well being,Gender
5
No
300
De Silva, Achini, Trond Bjorndal and Audun Lem. Role of gender in global fishery value chains: a feminist perspective on activity, access and control profile. AquaFish CRSP Proceedings: IIFET Special Session, July 2012.
documents
Women in Fisheries Bangladesh
Women in fishing communities play multidimensional roles. Women pervade fisheries and their roles were identified as workers in both fisheries, markets, processing plants and non-fishery, mothers who give birth to successors, as caregivers of the family, as connecting agents of social networks, as representatives of local culture, as community workers and governors. The main aim of this study is to identify and measure women’s involvement in global fishery value chains and investigating their activity, access and control profiles in fishery value chains in selected destinations in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Primary data were obtained from fisheries and aquaculture operations in Thailand, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Zimbabwe and Honduras. . Participant observation with experienced investigators, focus group discussion and gender resources maps were the principal data collection tools. Women play non-significant roles in capture fishery production and totally depend on religion and culture while their contribution in aquaculture production is great. Female roles were centred on household activities which take them away from direct income generation and access to the capital assets. Less educated, resource poor women are concentrated in the low value end of the value chains while the high value end of the value chains is mainly handled by the resource rich males and limited number of educated, resourced owned females. Women’s engagement is less in modern value chains with few nodes than the traditional complex and lengthier value chains.
Africa,Asia,Latin America
Women,Gender,Capture Fisheries,Aquaculture,value chain
4
No
301
Vipinkumar VP, Shyam S Salim, VD Deshmukh, SG Raje and Paramita B Sawant. Success case studies of women mobilisation in marine fisheries sector of Maharashtra. Discovery Nature, 2013, 2(6), 21-25.
documents
Women in Fisheries India
A study was undertaken in the selected locations in the coastal belts of Maharashtra state with a major objective of assessing the demographic characteristics and drawing specific cases of women in marine fisheries sector. The study was carried out in three coastal districts of Greater Mumbai, Thane and Alibag. Success Case studies of women mobilization were explored from the locations in the above districts such as ‘Marol Dry fish market’ in Greater Mumbai district, ‘Naigaon Night fish market’ in Thane district in and Milkatgar & Navgav locations of Alibag district in Maharashtra. Data collection on demographic characteristics was undertaken with trained enumerators and elucidation of specific success case studies of women in fisheries sector was undertaken on Marol Dry fish market in Versoa of Greater Mumbai district, Naigaon Night fish market in Thane district and Milkatgar & Navgav Women Self Help Groups of Alibag district of Maharashtra state. These strategy developed in these case studies can be used as a practical manual for mobilizing and managing women’s Self Help Groups in any key areas on a sustainable basis. These can be used as case model for promoting group action and group empowerment and for mobilizing women based enterprises in other key areas like Agriculture, Forestry, Floriculture, Agro-based industries, Watershed development etc.
Asia
Women,Fisheries,SHG,Empowerment
4
No
302
Kwena, Zachary A., Carol S. Camlin, Chris A. Shisanya, Isaac Mwanzo and, Elizabeth A. Bukusi, 2013. Short-Term Mobility and the Risk of HIV Infection among Married Couples in the Fishing Communities along Lake Victoria, Kenya. PLoS ONE 8(1): e54523. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054523
documents
Women in Fisheries Kenya
Mobility has long been associated with high HIV prevalence. We sought to assess sex differences in the relationship between mobility and risk for HIV infection among married couples in the fishing communities. We conducted 1090 gender-matched interviews and rapid HIV testing with 545 couples proportionally representing all the different sizes of the fish-landing beaches in Kisumu County. We contacted a random sample of fishermen as our index participants and asked them to enrol in the study together with their spouses. The consenting couples were separated into different private rooms for concurrent interviews and thereafter reunited for couple rapid HIV
counselling and testing. In addition to socio-economic and behavioural data, we collected information on overnight travels and divided couples in 4 groups as follows both partners not mobile, both partners mobile, only woman mobile, and only
man mobile. Other than descriptive statistics, we used X2 and U tests to compare groups of variables and multivariate logistic regression to measure association between mobility and HIV infection. We found significant differences in the number of trips women travelled in the preceding month (mean 4.6, SD 7.1) compared to men (mean 3.3, SD 4.9; p,0.01) and when the women did travel, they were more likely to spend more days away from home than their male partners (mean 5.2 [SD 7.2] versus 3.4 SD 5.6; p = 0.01). With an HIV prevalence of 22.7% in women compared to 20.9% among men, mobile women who had non-mobile spouses had 2.1 times the likelihood of HIV
infection compared to individuals in couples where both partners were non-mobile.
The mobility of fishermen’s spouses is associated with HIV infection that is not evident among fishermen themselves. Therefore, interventions in this community could be a combination of sex-specific programming that targets women and combined programming for couples.
Africa
Women,AIDS,Fishing Communities
4
No
303
Olufayo, The gender roles of women in aquaculture and food security in Nigeria. IIFET 2012 Tanzania Proceedings
documents
Women in Fisheries Nigeria
Women are recognized as agents of changes and development .Their involvement in
aquaculture is one issue that needs to be addressed when dealing with rural communities and poverty alleviation among the rural women .The major way to ensure that women utilize their full potentials in profitable aquaculture is to provide capacity building support which would eventually lead to poverty alleviation among them .The role of women in adopting new aquaculture technology has been restricted and often ignored because of the socio-cultural taboos against them. This paper enlightens women on the different stages of production in aquaculture that they could be involved in, as fishers for home consumption, they contribute significantly to the nutritional needs of their families. The idea is to empower the women with modern technologies in aquaculture to generate enough revenue to sustain their families and save the society from menace of fish scarcity. When women are involved in aquaculture production, it will go a long way in achieving the millennium development goals of eradicating extreme poverty, hunger and empowering women in Nigeria.
Africa
Women,Food Security,Aquaculture,Empowerment
4
No
304
RFLP, 2013. Gender Mainstreaming in Small-scale fisheries: Lessons-learned notes. Regional Fisheries Livelihoods Programme for South and Southeast Asia.
documents
www.rflp.org
Women in Fisheries Asia
As part of its efforts to promote gender equity to improve fisheries livelihoods RFLP developed a field handbook that gives guidance on taking gender into account in all phases of small-scale fisheries development projects.
The handbook provides:
• An overview of the rationale, concepts and approaches concerning mainstreaming gender equality in development cooperation;
• An overview of the role of women in the fisheries sector, the problems they face and possible empowerment opportunities;
• Tools for gender analysis in fisheries development projects and guidance on how to integrate gender aspects at various stages in the project cycle.
Asia
Gender,mainstreaming,Small Scale Fisheries,Livelihood
5
No
305
Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF) – The Economic Performance of the EU Aquaculture Sector – 2012 exercise (STECF-13-03). 2013. Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, EUR 25975 EN, JRC 81620, 237 pp.
documents
Women in Fisheries European Union
The purpose of the EWG 12‐13 meeting was to produce the 2012 Economic Report on the Economic Performance of the EU Aquaculture sector. This is the second report of this type, after last year’s report, produced for the aquaculture sector. This report provides a comprehensive overview of the latest information available on the structure, social, economic and competitive performance of the aquaculture sector at national and EU level. The data used in this publication relates from 2008 to 20010, and was collected under the Data Collection Framework (DCF). The report includes an EU overview chapter, detailed analysis by aquaculture subsector (i.e. shellfish, marine and freshwater aquaculture) and national chapters.
Europe
Aquaculture
4
No
306
Pant, J., M.K. Shrestha and R.C. Bhujel. Aquaculture and resilience: Women in aquaculture in Nepal. http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/WF_3460.pdf
documents
http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/WF_3460.pdf
Women in Fisheries Nepal
arming-based rural livelihoods are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of global climate change and sudden and profound changes in social and economic systems. Diversification of livelihood options is believed to be vital to maintaining ecosystem resilience and building social systems resilience. Integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) farming systems, considered among the promising options for small-scale farming households in China and Vietnam, are likely be relevant in the context of mixed crop- livestock farming systems elsewhere as well. An adaptive research project
carried out involving women members of ethnic Tharu, Darai, Bote and Gurung communities in Chitwan and Nawalparasi districts in Nepal between 2000 and 2007 evaluated the role of farm pond in diversifying livelihoods and reducing vulnerability. A newly introduced aquaculture sub-system complemented well with the existing mixed crop-livestock systems by virtue of increased synergistic relationships among the three sub-systems. Food and nutrition security of the participating households increased due primarily to a notable rise in quantity and frequency of fish consumption. In addition, household incomes were augmented through the sale of surplus fish. Development of Community Fish Production and Marketing Cooperatives exclusively owned and managed by the women themselves helped in women’s empowerment through their improved access to and control over resources and increased roles in decision-making
at both household and community levels. The study strongly suggests that IAA farming households are likely to be more resilient in coping with ecological, social and economic perturbations than their counterparts practicing traditional mixed crop-livestock farming.
Asia
Women,Livelihood,diversification,Aquaculture,resilience
4
No
307
Harper, Sarah, Dirk Zeller, Melissa Hauzer, DanielPauly and Ussif Rashid Sumaila. Women and fisheries: Contribution to food security and local economies. Marine Policy39(2013)56–63
documents
Women in Fisheries Pacific Island
The substantial role of women in fisheries is overlooked in management and policy. Fortunately, it is gaining recognition despite a lack of quantitative data describing the scale of participation and contribution. This work summarizes existing knowledge on women’s participation in marine fisheries globally, and estimates their contribution in the Pacific. While women’s role varies between geographic regions, in the Pacific, women account for 56% of annual small-scale catches, and resulting in an economic impact of 363 million USD (total revenue: 110 million USD). Recognizing and quantifying the role of women in fisheries has profound implications for management, poverty alleviation and development policy.
Oceania
Women,Food Security,Small Scale Fisheries,Role
5
No
308
Lindis Sloan, Joanna Kafarowski, Anna Heilmann, Anna Karlsdóttir, Maria Udén Luleå, Elisabeth Angell Norut and Mari Moen Erlandsen (Eds). Women’s Participation in Decision-making Processes in Arctic Fisheries Resource Management 2002-2004. Published by Forlaget Nora, Norway.
documents
Women in Fisheries Canada
This report puts gender equality in natural resource management on the circumpolar agenda as part of the work of the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council. In 2002, the Taking Wing conference on gender equality and women in the Arctic was held in Finland, with a focus on the link between gender equality and natural resource management for sustainable development. Norway followed up this conference and has contributed by putting gender equality questions on the agenda
of the Arctic Council. The Northern Feminist University had participated in the Taking Wing conference at the invitation of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and after the conference developed a project proposal for the “Women’s participation in decision-making processes in Arctic Fisheries Resource Management” project. Project partners from the Arctic Council nation states and permanent participants were invited to participate. Fisheries represent a traditional way of life and are of great economic and cultural importance to coastal populations in the Arctic, indigenous and non-indigenous Northern inhabitants. Women are part of these coastal settlements; fisheries resource management and regulatory measures affect their lives, yet they are not accorded
stakeholder status or participatory rights in regulatory bodies. This project has become a joint effort, with participants from Canada, Greenland, Iceland, the Faroes, Norway
and Sweden both in the work group and in the International Steering Committee. The Sámediggi, the Sámi Parliament in Norway, followed up on the original recommendation by commissioning a report on the gender equality aspect of their fisheries policy. A summary of this report is included as a separate chapter in the report. The report is based on statistics and fieldwork studies in the participating countries, and each national chapter contains both statistics on the fisheries in the country, a fieldwork report and in several cases, the author’s recommendations. In addition, the national project leaders have agreed on a set of recommendations to national authorities and to the industry, and the International Steering Committee has agreed to support these recommendations.
Europe
Women,Decision Making,Arctic
5
No
309
Cheke, Abiodun Oritsejemine. Women in fish value chain in Nigeria. IIFET 2012 Tanzania Proceedings
documents
Women in Fisheries Nigeria
Women in Nigeria play a key and vital role in the Fisheries value chain in Nigeria especially when we look at their involvement in the marine, artisanal and Aquaculture sub-sector of the Fisheries Sector. The women who constitute the greater percentage of the fish mongers/ processors represent the first segment of the fish market chain; buying fresh fish directly from the fishermen. The fish is either sold fresh by the women, or processed by smoking. In the aquaculture sector the women also play key roles in buying and processing. The women in the fisheries value chain are often grouped into Cooperatives Societies though we have a very, very few that go solo. However, the women’s activities in the value chain are characterized by low capital and technology input. Women’s work in fish value chain has not been optimized/ linked to value chain finance in Nigeria – thus they are limited to various financial services being put up by the commercial banks for the Agricultural Sector in the Country. This lack of Corporate
finance has in essence debar the women from upgrading their fisheries activities and businesses in the various steps along the fisheries value chain and they have thus not been able to build sustainable and viable fish trade especially when it comes to the export of their fish and other fishery products.
Africa
Women,value chain,Vendors,Fish Marketing
4
No
310
Pouw, N.R.M. and A. Thorpe (2013) ‘Fishing Na Everybody Business” : Women's Work and Gender Relations in the Artisanal Fisheries of Sierra Leone’, Feminist Economics, April (in print).
documents
Women in Fisheries Sierra Leone
While small-scale [artisanal] marine fisheries in many developing countries is “everybody’s business” , a strong gendered division of labour sees production concentrated in the hands of male fishermen - while women - ‘fish mammies’ - invariably dominate in the post-harvest processing and retailing sector. Consequently, the production bias of many fisheries management and historic donor support programmes (as well as academic research) has not only largely overlooked the critical role that fisherwomen play in the sector, but has also seen ‘fish mammies’ marginalised in terms of resource and training support. This paper employs a livelihoods framework to make the economic space occupied by women in the small-scale fisheries sector in Sierra Leone more ‘visible’, and highlights their variegated access to, and control over, different livelihood capitals and resources.
Africa
Women,Fisheries,Gender,PHF,Livelihood
4
No
311
Thorpe, Andy, David Whitmarsh, Ranita Sandi, Andrew Baio, Ndomahina Lebbie, Thomas Lebbie and Roberta Curiazi (2013): Pathways out of Poverty: Women – the ‘forgotten gender’ – and the Artisanal Fisheries Sector of Sierra Leone, African Historical Review, 45:1, 46-61. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17532523.2013.796131
documents
Women in Fisheries Sierra Leone
In a number of low-income countries the fisheries sector has been shown to be instrumental in meeting key development goals, specifically in combating malnutrition, but the crucial contribution of women within this sector has been largely overlooked. This is particularly true in Sierra Leone, despite gender featuring prominently in the country’s poverty reduction strategy. This article therefore examines the history of female involvement in the sector, how this involvement was transformed by the civil war, and assesses whether the various current initiatives to support women in the post-harvest sector offer a realistic ‘pathway out of poverty’
Africa
Women,Fisheries,Gender,Poverty,Food Security
4
No
312
Ganesh Chandra, B C. Jha, A P. Sharma, S K. Sahu, U Bhaumik, and A K. Das. "Role of Women in Fisheries of Chilika Lagoon, India: A Participatory Study" 100 Indian Science Congress, Section Animal Veterinary and Fishery Sciences. Kolkata, India. Jan. 2013.
documents
http://works.bepress.com/ganesh_chandra/45/
Women in Fisheries India
Chilika is the largest lagoon along the east coast of India, and one of the main sources of capture fisheries of Orissa and supports food and livelihood security to more than 100 thousand fishers living in 132 villages situated in and around the lagoon. Participatory study was conducted in four sectors of Chilika lagoon at eight villages namely Jaggannathpur (northern sector); Nairi, Kainchipur and Chandraput (central sector); Binchanapalli, Gouranga Patana & Gajpati Nagar (southern sector); and Arkakhuda (outer channel) to understand the role of fisherwomen in Chilika lagoon fisheries. The role played by the fisherwomen was diverse ranging from bringing fish catch from ghat (bank), selling of fish, grading and segregation of fish, fish drying, prawn and fish seed collection, repairing of nets and carrying food to the ghat. Selling of fish was done totally by fisherwomen in north, south and outer channel sector while only sixty percent fisher women were involved in southern sector. Grading and segregation of fish before selling is exclusive domain of fisherwomen. In Outer channel prawn and fish seed collection was exclusively done by the fisherwomen. As part of drudgery of work, fisherwomen recorded collection of firewood and selling of fish as the most difficult job. In terms of women income generation activities for the family, selling of fish was the highest income earning activity followed by fish drying, daily wage earning and prawn seed collection (only in outer channel).
Asia
Women,participatory approach,Labour,Income
4
No
313
Willson, Margaret Elizabeth. Icelandic Fisher Women's ExperienceImplications, Social Change, and Fisheries Policy, Ethnos (2013): Journal of Anthropology, DOI: 10.1080/00141844.2013.783606
documents
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2013.783606
Women in Fisheries Iceland
Icelandic women have been a part of the Icelandic fishing fleet since before the seventeenth century and continue to hold positions at all levels of the fishing industry. This appears to be different from any other group of female fishers about whom a study has been done in the industrialized world. This article examines the role of these
women and how multiple factors such as social change, fisheries policy, technology, mobility, and economics – including Iceland’s 2008 dramatic economic crash – are affecting these women’s ability and desire to fish. This article demonstrates the importance and implications of a gendered perspective when considering the effects of fisheries policy, practice, and any potential for sustainable fisheries that includes diverse factors including communities, economics, social change, and the natural environment.
Europe
Women,Fishing Fleet,Gender,Sustainable Fisheries
4
No
314
Fröcklin, Sara, Maricela de la Torre-Castro, Lars Lindström, and Narriman S. Jiddawi. Fish Traders as Key Actors in Fisheries: Gender and Adaptive Management. Ambio. 2013 December; 42(8): 951–962. Published online 2013 November 9. doi: 10.1007/s13280-013-0451-1
documents
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3824874
Women in Fisheries Tanzania
This paper fills an important gap towards adaptive management of small-scale fisheries by analyzing the gender dimension of fish trade in Zanzibar, Tanzania. We hypothesize that gender-based differences are present in the fish value chain and to test the hypothesis interviews were performed to analyze: (i) markets, customers, and mobility, (ii) material and economic resources, (iii) traded fish species, (iv) contacts and organizations, and (v) perceptions and experiences. Additionally, management documents were analyzed to examine the degree to which gender is considered. Results show that women traders had less access to social and economic resources, profitable markets, and high-value fish, which resulted in lower income. These gender inequalities are linked, among others, to women’s reproductive roles such as childcare and household responsibilities. Formal fisheries management was found to be gender insensitive, showing how a crucial feedback element of adaptive management is missing in Zanzibar’s management system, i.e., knowledge about key actors, their needs and challenges.
Africa
Zanzibar,Women,Gender,Trade
4
No
315
Dunphy, Corinne. “Well Fished: Women and our Fishing Future” http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/blog/editor/20863, Jan 18, 2014
multimedia
http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/Shows/More+Shows/Download/ID/2420007056/
Women in Fisheries Canada
Well Fished is a short documentary film exploring the lives of two young Nova Scotian women who, unlike other many their age, dream of living a life working on the Atlantic. Nova Scotia’s population and landscape have drastically changed throughout the decades. The role of women was also transformed with the passing of traditional gender roles and the decline of the male dominated fishing industry. The film portrays Grace MacDougall and Fallon Conway’s connection to Atlantic Canada’s older and disappearing fishing traditions. The setting for the film is northeastern Nova Scotia. Here lie two neighboring communities, both bound by character, shared history, friendly faces and access to the bone-chilling Atlantic Ocean. Grace lives in Antigonish, Fallon in Whitehead. Although the two have never met, they share parallel early mornings and even earlier evenings. Grace and Fallon are living the fishing lifestyle today essentially because of their family’s generational continuity in the industry. Effective management and protection for our small-scale family fisheries is crucial to keep the money circulating in seaside communities. Women’s roles are becoming more prominent and play an important role with the younger generation, the future of Nova Scotians striving to work and live in the province.
N. America
Women,Gender,Fisheries
4
documentary film
No
316
Kleiber, D., Harris, L. M. and Vincent, A. C. J. (2014), Gender and small-scale fisheries: a case for counting women and beyond. Fish and Fisheries. doi: 10.1111/faf.12075
documents
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12075/abstract
Women in Fisheries World
Marine ecosystem–scale fisheries research and management must include the fishing effort of women and men. Even with growing recognition that women do fish, there remains an imperative to engage in more meaningful and relevant gender analysis to improve socio-ecological approaches to fisheries research and management. The implications of a gender approach to fisheries have been explored in social approaches to fisheries, but the relevance of gender analysis for ecological understandings has yet to be fully elaborated. To examine the importance of gender to the understanding of marine ecology, we identified 106 case studies of small-scale fisheries from the last 20 years that detail the participation of women in fishing (data on women fishers being the most common limiting factor to gender analysis). We found that beyond gender difference in fishing practices throughout the world, the literature reveals a quantitative data gap in the characterization of gender in small-scale fisheries. The descriptive details of women's often distinct fishing practices nonetheless provide important ecological information with implications for understanding the human role in marine ecosystems. Finally, we examined why the data gap on women's fishing practices has persisted, detailing several ways in which commonly used research methods may perpetuate biased sampling that overlooks women's fishing. This review sheds light on a new aspect of the application of gender research to fisheries research, with an emphasis on ecological understanding within a broader context of interdisciplinary approaches.
World
Women,EbA,Ecosystem Approach,Small Scale Fisheries,Gender
5
No
317
Neis, B., S. Gerrard, and N. G. Power. 2013. Women and children first: the gendered and generational social-ecology of smaller-scale fisheries in Newfoundland and Labrador and northern Norway. Ecology and Society 18(4): 64. http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-06010-180464
documents
Women in Fisheries Canada
The resilience of small-scale fisheries in developed and developing countries has been used to provide lessons to conventional managers regarding ways to transition toward a social-ecological approach to understanding and managing fisheries. We contribute to the understanding of the relationship between management and the resilience of small-scale fisheries in developed countries by looking at these dynamics in the wake of the shock of stock collapse and fisheries closures in two contexts: Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, and northern Norway. We revisit and update previous research on the gendered effects of the collapse and closure of the Newfoundland and Labrador northern cod fishery and the closure of the Norwegian cod fishery in the early 1990s and present new research on young people in fisheries communities in both contexts. We argue that post-closure fishery policy and industry responses that focused on downsizing fisheries through professionalization, the introduction of quotas, and other changes ignored the gendered and intergenerational household basis of small-scale fisheries and its relationship to resilience. Data on ongoing gender inequities within these fisheries and on largely failed recruitment of youth to these fisheries suggest they are currently at a tipping-point that, if not addressed, could lead to their virtual disappearance in the near future.
Arctic,Europe,N. America
Gender,resilience,SSF,socio-ecological approach,youth
4
No
318
UNCTAD, 2014. The Fisheries Sector in the Gambia: Trade, Value Addition and Social Inclusiveness, with a Focus on Women
documents
http://www.enhancedif.org/en/system/files/uploads/the_fisheries_sector_in_the_gambia_with_a_focus_on_women_6.03.2014.pdf
Women in Fisheries Gambia
The relationship between trade and gender is highly contextual and country-specific, as the gender effects of trade depend on the specificities of individual economic sectors and countries. However, it is at times possible to extrapolate some general patterns that are likely to be found across countries. In general terms, The Gambian case study points to three critical dimensions that should be taken into account when promoting fish-export-oriented policies as a pro-poor strategy: i) the existence of gender-specific patterns
in the processing and marketing of fresh and cured fish products; ii) the resultant, gender-differentiated impacts of a commercial, export-oriented strategy in the fisheries sector; and iii) the need for trade policy responses that are gender-specific and redistributive.The realization of women’s commercial potential in these areas depends on enhancing their
access to credit and support services (training, extension and marketing). The strict implementation of stringent sanitary and phytosanitary measures is also critical, particularly if the focus is on high-value niche markets. Equally important is the siting of operations, which must be chosen taking into due account potential environmental pollution. Finally, in order to effectively identify and tackle market access and market
entry barriers, it is key to set up strategic alliances involving women operators, key public entities, and offtakers (for example: traders, specialized wholesalers and retailers in targeted export markets).
Africa
Women,Gender,Trade,Sanitation,Poverty,Markets
4
No
319
Salagrama, V. Climate Change and Fisheries, 2014: Perspectives from Small-Scale fishing communities in India on measures to protect lives and livelihoods. Summary document of a 2011 study. ICSF, 2014
documents
Climate change and fisheries,Climate change and adaptation India
The International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), with financial support from Heinrich Böll Stiftung-India, undertook a study in 2011 with the aim to highlight the perspectives of fishing communities on climate change and its implications on their lives and livelihoods, and to highlight the importance of developing and implementing adaptation and mitigation measures through consultative processes to address their poverty and food-security issues. The study was undertaken in selected locations in four coastal states of India, two on the east coast (Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal) and two on the west coast (Maharashtra and Kerala). Alongside the fishing communities, relevant institutional stakeholders in fisheries were consulted for their perspectives on climate change and to assess the current policy/institutional/research framework to deal with the issue. This summary document presents the key findings from the study as well as suggested actions to reduce vulnerability and enhance the resilience of fishers.
Asia
West Bengal,Vulnerability,Small Scale Fisheries,resilience,Maharashtra,Kerala,India,Fishing Communities,Climate Change,Andhra Pradesh,Adaptation
4
No
320
Salagrama, V. Climate Change and Fisheries, 2014: Perspectives from Small-Scale fishing communities in India on measures to protect lives and livelihoods. Summary document of a 2011 study in Bangla. ICSF, 2014.
books
Climate change and adaptation,Climate change and fisheries India
The International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), with financial support from Heinrich Böll Stiftung-India, undertook a study in 2011 with the aim to highlight the perspectives of fishing communities on climate change and its implications on their lives and livelihoods, and to highlight the importance of developing and implementing adaptation and mitigation measures through consultative processes to address their poverty and food-security issues. The study was undertaken in selected locations in four coastal states of India, two on the east coast (Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal) and two on the west coast (Maharashtra and Kerala). Alongside the fishing communities, relevant institutional stakeholders in fisheries were consulted for their perspectives on climate change and to assess the current policy/institutional/research framework to deal with the issue. This summary document presents the key findings from the study as well as suggested actions to reduce vulnerability and enhance the resilience of fishers.
Asia
Adaptation,Andhra Pradesh,Climate Change,Fishing Communities,India,Kerala,Maharashtra,resilience,Small Scale Fisheries
4
No
321
Salagrama, V. Climate Change and Fisheries, 2014: Perspectives from Small-Scale fishing communities in India on measures to protect lives and livelihoods. Summary document in Telugu of a 2011 study. ICSF, 2014
documents
Climate change and adaptation,Climate change and fisheries India
The International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), with financial support from Heinrich Böll Stiftung-India, undertook a study in 2011 with the aim to highlight the perspectives of fishing communities on climate change and its implications on their lives and livelihoods, and to highlight the importance of developing and implementing adaptation and mitigation measures through consultative processes to address their poverty and food-security issues. The study was undertaken in selected locations in four coastal states of India, two on the east coast (Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal) and two on the west coast (Maharashtra and Kerala). Alongside the fishing communities, relevant institutional stakeholders in fisheries were consulted for their perspectives on climate change and to assess the current policy/institutional/research framework to deal with the issue. This summary document presents the key findings from the study as well as suggested actions to reduce vulnerability and enhance the resilience of fishers.
Asia
Andhra Pradesh,Adaptation,Climate Change,Fishing Communities,India,Kerala,Maharashtra,resilience,Small Scale Fisheries
4
No
322
Andy Thorpe, Nicky Pouw, Andrew Baio, Ranita Sandi, Ernest Tom Ndomahina & Thomas Lebbie (2014). Fishing Na Everybody Business”: Women's Work and Gender Relations in Sierra Leone's Fisheries. Feminist Economics, Volume 20, Issue 3, 2014. DOI:10.1080/13545701.2014.895403
documents
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545701.2014.895403?journalCode=rfec20#.U975zfmSzSn
Women in Fisheries Sierra Leone
While small-scale fisheries in many developing countries is “everybody's business,” a gendered labor division concentrates production in the hands of fishermen while women dominate postharvest processing and retailing. The production bias of fisheries management programs has not only largely overlooked the role of fisherwomen, but also marginalized “fish mammies” in terms of resources and training. This study draws on three in-country fisheries surveys, as well as interviews and focus groups, and employs a gender-aware sustainable livelihood framework to make visible the economic space occupied by women in Sierra Leone's small-scale fisheries. The study highlights how women's variegated access to capital and resources interacts with social norms and reproductive work and argues for more social and economic investment in women's fish processing and reproductive work enabling them to reconcile both roles more effectively.
Africa
Women,Fisheries,Gender,Poverty,Development
4
No
323
NORAD, (April 2014). Study of fisheries and aquaculture value chains in Mozambique. How to reduce gender discrimination in the fisheries and aquaculture sectors.( Cecile Brugere International Consultant and Bodil Maal LIRE/Norad). Norad report 4/2014. Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation, Oslo, Norway
documents
Women and Resources Management,Women in Fisheries Mozambique
A fact-finding mission about the role women play in fisheries and aquaculture in
Mozambique was conducted between January 28 and February 14, 2014. The mission’s
objective was to document the participation of women in two value chains: The smallscale capture fisheries value chain and the aquaculture value chain. The task was to identify entry points for improving the work condition and creating equal access to resources and opportunities for women in the two value chains, the study area was in Gaza Province. The capture fisheries value chain was found to be well established. Male fishers are typically involved in the production of the commodity (resource management and catch), and women are predominantly engaged in trading activities. But their social organization is weak and women are under-represented in local fisheries management committees and credit and savings groups resulting in poor access to fish preservation equipment. The aquaculture value chain, on the other hand, does not include post-harvest traders and operations. Aquaculture producers operate either individually or through associations of producers. In contrast to the capture fisheries sector, women dominate aquaculture production. This is a result of specific targeting of women by the government extension officers. The mission identified a number of areas as possible entry points towards the further involvement and improvements for women engaged in the small scale capture fisheries sector and the aquaculture sector.
Africa
Women,Gender,Aquaculture,Capture Fisheries,interventions,Small Scale Fisheries
4
No
324
Brugere, Cecile (20140. Mainstreaming gender in transboundary natural resources projects – the experience of the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) project, Environmental Development, Volume 11, July 2014, Pages 84-97, ISSN 2211-4645, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envdev.2014.05.003.
documents
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211464514000487
Women in Fisheries Bangladesh
The Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) project aims to improve the lives of men and women depending on the fisheries resources of the Bay of Bengal. Despite the major role women play in fisheries, the contents of the project documents have however remained gender-blind. The paper proposes that the Theory of Change offers a compelling framework to consider how this could be redressed in an ex-post manner, enabling transboundary natural resources projects such as the BOBLME project to contribute to gender equality and women׳s empowerment. Practical steps are suggested. They include the elaboration of a high-level statement of political will to gender equality and the consideration of gender-sensitive actions and cross-cutting issues covering communication, gender-disaggregated data collection and governance. A commitment to impact through human capacity building and the allocation of adequate budgets for gender mainstreaming, is fundamental to embrace the change process that progress towards gender equality requires. In line with the Theory of Change, the development of a pathway to impact and use of gender-sensitive outcome mapping as a form of monitoring and evaluation are suggested as pivotal in capturing the changes expected from mainstreaming gender in the project and the project׳s own influence in progressing towards gender equality in the region. The mainstreaming approach proposed could be generalised to other transboundary natural resources projects of a similar institutional and operational structure to the BOBLME project.
Asia
Gender,mainstreaming,Fisheries,Bay of Bengal
4
No
325
Doss, Cheryl and Caitlin Kieran, Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data for gender analysis: a guide for CGIAR researchers (2013). Paper presented at the Workshop on Methods and Standards for Research on Gender and Agriculture, Montpellier June 19-21 2013, organized by the CRP Policies, Institutions and Markets (PIM) and CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network.
documents
http://www.pim.cgiar.org/files/2012/05/Standards-for-Collecting-Sex-Disaggregated-Data-for-Gender-Analysis.pdf
Role of Women World
According to the CGIAR’s Strategy and Results Framework, “gender inequality and its ramifications in terms of lower female education, women’s lack of land rights, inequitable access to both income and agricultural inputs within the household, associated lack of control over investment decisions in the farm household, and the larger labor burden borne by women, all fundamentally constrain the ability to meet [its goals]” of reducing poverty, strengthening food security, improving human health and nutrition, and enhancing sustainable management of natural resources. Without considering the role of gender, critical components necessary for the design and evaluation of programs, policies, and technologies may be missed, rendering them less successful and less likely to benefit both men and women. In order to monitor progress of CGIAR on its agreed outcome of “Increased control over resources and participation in decision-making by women and other marginalized groups” as well as other development outcomes such as improvements in income, productivity, nutrition, and resilience, CGIAR researchers are increasingly asked to collect sex-disaggregated data and conduct gender analyses. This document spells out some simple and achievable steps for collecting relevant sex-disaggregated data for five broad research areas.
Women,Gender,Database,Data
4
No
326
Worldfish, The Legal Background to Community Based Fisheries Management in Bangladesh.
documents
http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/WF_540.pdf
Community based management,Legal Issues Bangladesh
This booklet summarizes the legal knowledge and experiences built up and challenges faced during five years of implementation of the Community Based Fisheries Management Project - 2nd Phase. In Bangladesh, the legal framework for the management of fisheries developed from two different legal regimes. The various laws on fisheries enacted during the colonial period define fisheries as “public” and “private ” For management purposes, “fisheries” have also been classified as “open” and “closed” water fisheries in the management guidelines. The definition of “fishery” was first included in the Protection and Conservation Act, 1950 through an amendment in 1995. In general, laws on fisheries do not regulate the principles and practices of leasing or physical management of fisheries. The Land Management Manual, 1990 attempted to carry this out however this was completely changed through subsequent administrative decisions. The booklet also summarizes lessons learnt during CBFM-2 with respect to legal hurdles faced.
Asia
Legislation,Community Based Management,Fisheries Management
4
No
327
Nguyen Thi Kim Anh (2012). Community-based Co-management in Vietnamese fisheries. The case of the Fisheries Associations in Tam Giang-Cau Hai Lagoon. Master Thesis in Fisheries and Aquaculture Management and Economics, The Norwegian College of Fishery Science University of Tromso, Norway & Nha Trang University, Vietnam
documents
http://munin.uit.no/bitstream/handle/10037/4771/thesis.pdf?sequence=2
Co-management,Community based management Vietnam
The open access fisheries regime has led to the degradation of marine resources and to
conflicts in sharing them and the fishing grounds in Tam Giang Cau Hai lagoon in Thua
Thien Hue, Vietnam. In 2003, community-based fisheries management (CBFM), particularly through Fisheries Associations (FA), was introduced and established. As of 2011, there were 62 local FAs. It means that local FAs have played an important role in the implementation of CBFM and as a major partner of the Government in protection of aquatic resource and fisheries management. This study highlights the demands of implementation, level of awareness and participation, effectiveness and weakness and methods for measuring the transaction costs in Giang Xuan FA in particular and fisheries Co-management system in general. The study also demonstrates the transaction cost concept and approach for assessing such costs in fisheries Co-management systems.
Asia
Co-management,Community Based Management,Participation
4
No
328
K. Sivakumar (Ed.) 2013. Coastal and Marine Protected Areas in India: Challenges and Way Forward, ENVIS Bulletin: Wildlife & Protected Areas. Vol. 15 Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun-248001, India. 368 pp.
documents
Marine Protected Areas India
This is the first issue in the ENVIS Thematic Bulletins series to be published by the Wildlife Institute of India (WII). In its fifth national report to CBD, India adopted national biodiversity targets that promote effective and equitable area-based conservation measures that are to be integrated with the country's seascapes. In this context, this ENVIS bulletin, 'Coastal and Marine Protected Areas: Challenges and Way Forward', presents collated and analysed information for those concerned with conservation and management of the marine environment in India.
The introduction of this issue of the bulletin summarizes the extent of the MPAs in the country and provides a complete description of the biodiversity treasures of the coastal and marine regions in India. Section I presents status reports of MPAs in nine coastal States/Union Territories that address the entire gamut of issues related to management of MPAs in the respective States/Union Territories. Section II gives an overview of the important coastal and marine biodiversity areas of peninsular India, highlighting their importance, management and conservation. The gaps in research and management of marine biodiversity in the country are discussed in Section III and Section IV. Section V deals with the tools and techniques used in monitoring marine biodiversity and habitats in India. A selected bibliography on MPAs in India is provided in the last section of this issue.
Asia
MPA,Biodiversity,Conservation,Monitoring,Social Issues
4
No
329
M.R. Sowman, R. Rajagopalan, C. Sharma, and J. Sunde. (2014)Making space for small-scale fishing communities: Use and misuse of spatial management instruments. Chapter 24 in ‘Governance of Marine Fisheries and Biodiversity Conservation: Interaction and Coevolution, First Edition’. Eds Serge M. Garcia, Jake Rice and Anthony Charles. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2014.
books
Marine Protected Areas India
This chapter in the book on governance of marine fisheries considers the impacts of conservation and conventional fisheries management approaches and practices, especially the implementation of marine protected areas (MPAs) and other spatially based management measures, on the socioeconomic and customary rights of coastal fishing communities. Despite a plethora of international instruments recognizing the need to respect the rights of local fisher communities, research suggests that communities continue to be impacted. Case studies in India and South Africa demonstrate how MPAs have resulted in major impacts on fishers’ access to food and livelihoods as well as loss of customary rights and cultural practices. The disjuncture between policy rhetoric and implementation practices is evident and, on this basis, adoption and mainstreaming of a human-rights-based approach from policy level through to management action is proposed. Governance mechanisms include recognition of small-scale fishing communities’ human rights, integration of social and cultural dimensions in planning and management and involvement of fishers in decision-making processes.
Africa,Asia
MPA,Fisheries Management,Conservation,Food Security,Livelihood,Rights,Human Rights,Customary Rights,SSF
4
No
330
Porter, M. (2012). Why the Coast Matters for Women: A Feminist Approach to Research on Fishing Communities. Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries: Moving the Agenda Forward Asian Fisheries Science Special Issue Vol.25S (2012):59-73
documents
Women in Fisheries Canada
Issues of gender are neglected in fisheries research and issues of fisheries are also neglected in feminist research. These twin omissions hamper our efforts to understand women’s experiences in coastal and fishing communities. This paper addresses the problem that policy is often directed narrowly at improving fish harvesting and
processing, without taking account of its impact on women, families and the community. The paper makes use of data from studies in two countries in different regions, Tanzania and Atlantic Canada, to illustrate how a feminist approach can uncover unequal gender relations of power and inequality in fishing communities and how these are integrated and justified in political, cultural and social structures. To overcome the limitations of small scale, context specific studies of women in coastal or fishing communities, we need to develop common frames, focusing on power, inequality and discrimination and, more positively, the ways in which women negotiate a better position for themselves and their families.
Africa,N. America
Tanzania,Gender,Women,Canada,Policy,Fishing Communities
5
No
331
Jonas, Harry, Dilys Roe and Jael E. Makagon. Human Rights Standards for Conservation An Analysis of Responsibilities, Rights and Redress for Just Conservation. IIED Issue Paper. IIED, London.
documents
http://pubs.iied.org/14644IIED
Marine Protected Areas World
This research report presents a synthesis of the relevance of human rights standards to different conservation actors, an assessment of current standards and trends in international law, and an analysis of the various redress mechanisms available when rights are violated. It concludes with a number of options for further elaborating
a set of minimum human rights standards to be applied to all conservation initiatives. Section 2 highlights how it is not just States that are obligated to uphold human rights
standards but that non-state actors including international organisations, businesses and NGOs (including funders) also have responsibilities. Section 3 provides an overview of international law relevant to conservation and the rights that are provided for within that body of law. Section 4 underscores the challenges that Indigenous Peoples and local communities face when seeking redress for harm caused by conservation actors who have violated their rights. Finally, Section 5 proposes a number of options, each of which presents tangible approaches to address the issues.
General
Conservation,Policy,MPA,Protected Areas,Indigenous Communities
4
No
332
Kumar, Mukul, K Saravanan and Nityanand Jayaraman, 2014. Mapping the Coastal Commons Fisherfolk and the Politics of Coastal Urbanisation in Chennai. Economic & Political Weekly, Vol XLIX no 48. November 29, 2014
documents
Community based management,Recognition and Policy,Right to Resources India
Multiple, overlapping logics of urbanisation are transforming Tamil Nadu’s coast. Real estate, infrastructure, tourism, and urban beautification plans are putting unprecedented pressure on the coastal commons. Fisherfolk, whose everyday life and survival is rooted in the commons, are at the centre of these processes of coastal urbanisation. Faced with the prospect of losing access to these spaces, fisherfolk are
drawing upon their customary knowledge and new satellite mapping techniques to assert their rights to land and livelihoods.
Asia
Fishing Communities,Rights,Resources Management,Maps
4
No
333
Dorothy B. Kakongoro Kabugo, Rhoda Tumwebaze, Peter Kibas and James Jjumbe. Gender Disparities on Women’s Livelihoods in Small Scale Fishers, Uganda. Nkumba Business Journal (NBJ), ISSN: 1564-068X, Volume 13, Oct. 2014, pp. 37-57;
documents
http://www.nkumbauniversity.ac.ug/
Women in Fisheries Uganda
The paper examines gender disparities and its effect on women‘s livelihoods in Small Scale Fishers (SSFs) in Kalangala District of Uganda. In spite of various attempts to lessen the negative effect of gender disparities, women‘s livelihood in SSF‘s has continued to be poor. Findings showed that (a) due to social / cultural gender disparities men dominated in major fishing activities while 91% women employed in post-harvest activities alongside domestic chores. (b) Women‘s low education (79% attained up to primary level compared to 50% men with secondary education), child rearing obligations, and cultural constraints make them less qualified than men for economically productive employment. (c) Only 20% women compared to 60% men were involved in other income generating activities. Women lacked land or personal houses for bank loan security. (d) Resource ownership, access and control had majority of fishing gear assets owned by men (76%) who earned above $1333 weekly compared to 38% women who between $15 and $ 29. The majority of women were unable to easily access the available though inadequate social services because of long distances with unreliable, costly transport and domestic work load. These disparities had an effect on women‘s livelihoods in that they could not engage in economically productive work.
Africa
Women,Fishing Communities,Gender,Livelihood,Income
4
No
334
Lam, VWY ,WWL Cheung, W Swartz and UR Sumaila. Climate change impacts on fisheries in West Africa: implications for economic, food and nutritional security. African Journal of Marine Science. 34:1, 103-117, DOI: 10.2989/1814232X.2012.673294
documents
http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/1814232X.2012.673294
Climate change and fisheries Africa
West Africa was identified as one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change in previous global analyses. Adverse changes in marine resources under climate change may pose significant threats to the livelihoods and well-being of the communities and countries that depend on fisheries for food and income. However, quantitative studies on the potential impact of climate change on fisheries and its subsequent impact on human well-being in West Africa are still scarce. This paper aims to assess the potential impacts of climate change on fisheries and their effects on the economics, food and nutritional security in West Africa. We use a dynamic bioclimatic envelope model to project future distribution and maximum fisheries catch potential of fish and invertebrates in West African waters. Our projections show that climate change may lead to substantial reduction in marine fish production and decline in fish protein supply in this region by the 2050s under the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) A1B. Combining with economic parameters, we project a 21% drop in annual landed value, 50% decline in fisheries-related jobs and a total annual loss of US$311 million in the whole economy of West Africa. These changes are expected to increase the vulnerability of the region through economics and food security of West Africa to climate change.
Africa
Vulnerability,Fisheries,Food Security,Africa,Climate Change
4
No
335
Sharon Groenmeyer (2014) Confronting stereotypes in the fishing industry in post-apartheid South Africa: A case study of women on the West Coast in the Western Cape, South Africa, African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development, 6:4, 355-366, DOI: 10.1080/20421338.2014.966042
documents
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20421338.2014.966042
Women in Fisheries South Africa
Drawing on research conducted in fish processing and allied industries, the women in this study engage in shoreline activities collecting mussels, red bait, shellfish, seaweed; catching crayfish and fish or cleaning fish and mending nets. Women’s role in fishing is a source of sustainable livelihood for the inhabitants of the fishing villages of Paternoster and Saldanha Bay on the West Coast, one hundred and forty kilometres from Cape Town. Like many coastal communities in South Africa, these villages have a long history of harvesting marine resources such as fish, shellfish, rock lobster or crayfish for their livelihood. The paper focuses on how women confront gender stereotyping in fishing and how social policies like affirmative action and employment equity impact on women in a democratising South Africa. The paper also highlights ways that women in fish processing innovate and develop strategies to cope with gender-related workplace problems in the industry.
Africa
Women,Fish Processing,Sustainable Fisheries,Livelihood,Equity,Policy,coping
4
No
336
Ram-Bidesi, Vina (2015). Recognizing the role of women in supporting marine stewardship in the Pacific Islands. Marine Policy, Volume 59, September 2015, Pages 1–8; doi: doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2015.04.020
documents
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X15001025
Women in Fisheries Fiji
The study analyzes support for fisheries management through the adoption of ethical principles that can initiate change in individual behaviour, attitude and actions implicit in the current policies for achieving sustainable fisheries. It highlights that women can potentially play important roles in many Pacific Island coastal communities through their multiple responsibilities, and should therefore, be recognized as key agents for such change. Using the case of four villages in Fiji, the study demonstrates the close interaction between women and children. As primary caregivers and fishers, women are instrumental in instilling the desired social and moral values in children at a young age, the critical years in the development of children’s cultural and value systems. Women would influence children to follow fishing practices that are sustainable and support the protection of the marine environment while at the same time, nurture the culture of marine stewardship and marine citizenship. This, in turn, could encourage individual’s voluntary action that can simultaneously serve multiple societal objectives including the reduction in fisheries management costs. Recognizing women’s direct and indirect role in the fisheries sector and empowering them in this regard is, however a necessary condition.
Australia/Oceania
Children,Women,responsible fisheries,Pacific Islands,Coastal Fisheries
4
No
337
Surtees, Rebecca. 2014. In African waters. The trafficking of Cambodian fishers in South Africa
documents
https://nexushumantrafficking.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/inafricanwaters1.pdf
Labour Issues Cambodia
This study discusses the trafficking of men in the fishing industry. It focuses on Cambodian men severely exploited in South African waters. Through extensive interviews, NEXUS reveals the stories of how the men were recruited and transported as well as their trafficking experiences at sea. The study also discusses how these trafficked fishers were (or, more commonly, were not) identified as trafficking victims and what assistance they did (or did not) receive when they escaped and returned home to Cambodia and sought to reintegrate into their families and communities. The Executive Summary is available in Khmer.
Asia
trafficking,South Africa,Labour,Fishermen,Cambodia,Africa
4
No
338
Surtees, Rebecca. 2013. Trapped at Sea. Using the Legal and Regulatory Framework to Prevent and Combat the Trafficking of Seafarers and Fishers
documents
https://groningenjil.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/04-surtees.pdf
Labour Issues World
In this article, NEXUS frames what constitutes trafficking at sea, both in the commercial fishing sector and in the merchant fleet and presents the legal and regulatory framework to combat trafficking at sea – namely, international anti-trafficking law, international maritime law and the international law of the sea. The article considers the “three P paradigm” of anti-trafficking (that is, prevention, protection and prosecution) and how improved policies, regulation, legislation and enforcement have the potential to contribute to an improved situation for seafarers and fishers—to both prevent and combat trafficking in commercial fishing and the merchant fleet.
Asia
trafficking,Small Scale Fisheries,seafarer,Legal Issues,Labour,forced labour,Fisheries
4
No
339
Surtees, Rebecca. 2012. Trafficked at sea. The exploitation of Ukrainian seafarers and fishers
documents
https://nexushumantrafficking.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/trafficked-at-sea.pdf
Labour Issues Ukraine
Trafficking for forced labor, including trafficking for labor in the merchant shipping and fishing industries, has been increasingly recognized as a major form of human trafficking. Reported cases signal that there are aspects of the commercial fishing and seafaring sectors which may lend themselves particularly to trafficking abuses. This paper explores and discusses the experiences of trafficked Ukrainian seafarers and fishers in order that anti-trafficking policies and programs can take into account their experiences and needs. While the stories of these trafficked Ukrainian seafarers and fishers highlight some unique experiences, many of the issues raised in this report have wider application to incidences of trafficking at sea around the world.
trafficking,Fisheries,Small Scale Fisheries,Labour,Migration,seafarer
4
No
340
Dragiewicz, Molly. 2015. At sea. The trafficking of seafarers and fishers from Ukraine. In Global human trafficking. Critical issues and contexts
books
http://nexusinstitute.net/publications/trafficking-for-fishing/
Labour Issues World
This book chapter explores the issue of trafficking at sea. In this chapter, NEXUS shares the experiences of forty-six trafficked Ukrainian seafarers and fishers. It describes how Ukrainian men were recruited, transported and severely exploited, as well as their experiences of escape from trafficking and their subsequent reintegration into their families and societies. In considering limitations in the identification of and assistance to the trafficked Ukrainian seafarers/fishers, the chapter outlines key challenges in the protection of trafficked seafarers and fishers and intervention needs and opportunities in combating trafficking at sea. While highlighting the specific and unique aspects of the Ukrainian experience, the chapter will also be of interest to those considering forced labor on board seagoing vessels more generally that is occurring around the world.
World
trafficking,seafarer,Migration,Labour,Human Development,forced labour,Fishing Industry
4
No
341
Kailola, Patricia J. 2015. Crew conditions on fishing vessels in the Pacific Islands region - Discussion paper
documents
http://www.pacificdialogue.com.fj/images/pdf/2015_Tuna_forum.pdf
Labour Issues Pacific Island
My purpose in inviting a discussion on crew conditions in the Pacific Islands comes from three directions. One path is fisheries and environment, another is job security and food supply, a third is human rights. Thus, the content of this paper is arranged under those three ‘directions’, each with a passable level of information. The link between the three is clear. Participants may judge them as reasonable or unreasonable but they are aimed at the survival and achievement of the fishery which future depends on the resource, access to markets, and the vessel crews.
World
Labour,Migration
4
No
342
Report of the workshop for West Africa - Francophone women - Mbour (Senegal), 5 October 2016
documents
Women in Fisheries Africa
This is report of the workshop organized to discuss the draft gender guidebook on SSF Guidelines.
Africa
Women
5
No
343
The Women Role of the Marine Artisanal Fishery: A Study of a Fishery Community of the City of Rio das Ostras, RJ, Brazil
books
Women in Fisheries Albania
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Asia
Access Rights
1
No
344
Report on Human Trafficking, Forced Labour and Fisheries Crime in the Indonesian Fishing Industry by IOM, Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, and Coventry University. 2016.
documents
http://indonesia.iom.int/sites/default/files/Human%20Trafficking%2C%20Forced%20Labour%20and%20Fisheries%20Crime%20in%20the%20Indonesian%20Fishing%20Industry%20-%20IOM%20.pdf
Labour Issues Indonesia
This research provides a glimpse into a far-reaching and well-entrenched
criminal industry operating alongside the legitimate fishing industry, and often
overlapping. The situation represents the spread of transnational organized
crime at sea and the threat it poses as a maritime security threat to nations, and
a human security threat to fishers, seafarers and fishing communities.
Asia
forced labour
4
No
345
Barbara Neis, Marian Binkley, Siri Gerrard and Maria Cristina Maneschy. (Eds.). (2005). Changing Tides: Gender, Fisheries and Globalization
books
http://toobigtoignore.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Changing-Tides-TEXT.pdf
Women in Fisheries,Women and Resources Management,Globalization,Fisheries Management World
This book is about the way women’s lives and gender relations within the world’s fisheries are being shaped by globalization. The collection combines short, focused articles taken from Samudra and Yemaya, publications of the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), with research done by activists and academics from around the world. The short articles give voice to the concerns of fisheries workers while the regional and national case studies scrutinize the links between changes in fisheries associated with globalization and the experiences of women who depend upon fisheries. They also address larger theoretical, cultural and social justice issues related to gender, globalization and fisheries.
World
Women,Vendors,Socio-economic Aspects,Globalisation,Gender,Fishing Industry,Fisheries Trade,Fisheries Research,Fisheries Management,Fish Processing,Fish Marketing
5
No
346
Biswas, Nilanjana. Towards gender-equitable small-scale fisheries governance and development - A handbook. FAO. 2017
books
http://www.fao.org/3/a-i7419e.pdf
Women in Fisheries World
The Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) are the first internationally negotiated document dedicated specifically to the small-scale fisheries sector (see Box 1). The Guidelines represent a global consensus on principles and guidance for small-scale fisheries governance and development (FAO, 2016d). Notably, the principles of gender equity and equality are upheld as fundamental guiding principles in the SSF Guidelines. This represents a significant achievement towards women’s empowerment. At the same time, it also represents an opportunity for governments to meet important goals related to social and economic equity and equality, environmental sustainability, and local food security, including relevant Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). During consultations and capacity development events organized in the context of the SSF Guidelines implementation process, various stakeholders expressed the need for specific gender guidance in support of the application of the Guidelines.

This document, Towards Gender-Equitable Small-Scale Fisheries – A handbook In support of the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (henceforth the “handbook”), was developed to support gender-equitable small-scale fisheries by enhancing the understanding of their gender dimensions, with a focus on the specific role and conditions of women in the small-scale fisheries sector.
World
Women,VGSSF,Socio-economic Aspects,Small Scale Fisheries,ICSF,Governance,Gender,Fishing Communities,FAO,Equity
5
No
347
Quist, Cornelie. A Gender Analysis of the Adopted Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication: Constraints and Opportunities. Asian Fisheries Science Special Issue 29S (2016). 149-160pp.
journalarticle
http://www.asianfisheriessociety.org/publication/abstract.php?id=1115
Women in Fisheries World
The Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (VG SSF), endorsed by the 31st Session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in June 2014, are a major achievement towards ensuring secure and sustainable small scale fisheries. Significant is that the VG SSF make a serious attempt to include the role of women in small scale fisheries; they address issues of importance for women’s lives and livelihoods and attempt to ensure gender sensitive policies and measures. By applying a gender lens to the VG SSF, this note synthesises all the articles of the VG SSF of importance for gender equality in small scale fisheries and assesses the opportunities and limitations. The note concludes that the VG SSF, despite several weaknesses, do provide an opportunity for a transformative plan of action for implementation and key strategies are identified.
VGSSF,Women,Gender,Equity,Fishing Industry,Small Scale Fisheries,Fishing Communities
4
No
348
Quist, Cornelie. Through the gender lens. Yemaya 45, April 2014.
journalarticle
https://www.icsf.net/images/yemaya/pdf/english/issue_45/2028_art_yem45eng_art01.pdf
Women in Fisheries World
The Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (the Guidelines), which were discussed in a meeting in Rome in February 2014, make a serious attempt to include the role of women in small-scale fisheries, address issues of importance for women’s lives and livelihoods and attempt to ensure gender-sensitive policies and measures. Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) played a significant role in this, highlighting during a series of regional consultations, the importance both of recognizing women’s role in the fisheries and fishing communities and of respecting women’s human rights and dignity in society. The CSOs also attended the technical consultations on the Guidelines where the text was negotiated. Further, they lobbied governments to adopt text proposals that defended the interests of small-scale fishing communities, including proposals on gender issues.
World
Women,VGSSF,Small Scale Fisheries,Gender,Fishing Communities
4
No
349
Judd, Jason., Chotikajan, Supavadee. Ship to Shore Rights Baseline research findings on fishers and seafood workers in Thailand. International Labour Organization (ILO), 2018. 84p.
documents
http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/---sro-bangkok/documents/publication/wcms_619727.pdf
Labour Issues Thailand
The EU-funded ILO Ship to Shore Rights Project conducted the baseline research on Thai fishing and seafood industry in March and April 2017. The research surveyed 434 workers in 11 provinces within Chonburi, Chumporn, Pattani, Phang Nga, Phuket, Rayong, Samut Sakhon, Songkla, Surat Thani, Trang and Ranong provinces. Workers surveyed were divided almost evenly between those who work in fishing and seafood processing (which included aquaculture.) The research covered workers recent experience in the industry on recruitment, wages, hours, safety and health, support services, complaint mechanisms, living conditions, forced labour indicators, and legal compliance levels.
Asia
Working Conditions,Wages,Thailand,Occupational Safety,Occupational Hazards,Migration,Living Conditions,Labour Standards,Labour Rights,Labour Productivity,Labour,ILO,Illegal Fishing,forced labour,Access Rights
4
No
350
Fishery Exports and the Economic Development of LDCs: Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Comoros, Mozambique, Myanmar and Uganda. UNCTAD. 2017
documents
http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/aldc2017d2_en.pdf
Trade and Market Access Bangladesh
The present study analyses the main supply-side and demand-side constraints that undermine the growth and development potential of the fishery sector of LDCs, with a particular focus on international food quality and safety standards in major importing countries. The study presents evidence from six case studies – Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Comoros, Mozambique, Myanmar and Uganda – and provides policy conclusions and recommendations for action by stakeholders in LDCs and their development partners. The study argues that, if nationally or regionally imposed standards are harmonized, simplified and realigned with internationally agreed standards, and if LDCs receive robust targeted technical and financial support to build their capabilities to meet such standards, there is considerable scope for many LDCs to become successful exporters of fishery products. There is, equally, a need to establish in LDCs pragmatic and forward-looking trade policies that emphasize tapping the potential of their fishery sectors for the diversification of exports. Fishery polices should be fully integrated into and made consistent with overall trade and national development strategies (UNCTAD, 2016).
Asia
Exports,Fisheries Trade,Sustainable Development,Sustainable Fisheries,Sustainable Management,Sustainable Use,UNCTAD,Bangladesh,Comoros,Cambodia,Mozambique,Myanmar,Uganda
5
No